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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Maaike Kleinsmann and Rianne Valkenburg

In an empirical study learning opportunities were identified. Learning opportunities are enablers or disablers for the achievement of shared understanding.

Abstract

Purpose

In an empirical study learning opportunities were identified. Learning opportunities are enablers or disablers for the achievement of shared understanding.

Design/methodology/approach

Actors were interviewed about their communication process. The learning history method was used to analyze and structure the data. From the learning histories learning opportunities were derived. Finally, the learning opportunities were categorized.

Findings

Learning opportunities were found on three levels: the actor, project and company level. They were also joined in six themes. Combining these two patterns showed that learning opportunities are interrelated.

Research limitations/implications

The case study done was retrospective for the actors involved. Therefore, only conclusions could be drawn on the achievement of shared understanding. To be able to say more about the creation of shared understanding, following a NPD project real time would be desirable, in future research.

Practical implications

This study shows the importance for managers of looking across boundaries. Only solving problems integrally within the organization will help to solve problems successfully. Knowing the learning opportunities of a NPD project finished, will help them to improve future projects. The explicit use of storytelling during a NPD project may help to create a learning organization with shared understanding between the actors.

Originality/value

Previous research showed, shared understanding is important, to be able to manage the integration of different knowledge domains. However, these studies do not describe learning opportunities for the achievement of shared understanding, which was done in this study.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

David Rae

This paper describes an approach called opportunity centred learning that has been developed by the author and applied in the field of enterprise education. The…

Abstract

This paper describes an approach called opportunity centred learning that has been developed by the author and applied in the field of enterprise education. The relationship between opportunity centred learning and existing theory and practice in learning and education is outlined in comparison with problem‐based learning and action learning, and the process for using it is described. An example of the type of mind‐maps adopted and a short case study illustrate the approach. The conclusions and implications for educational practice including the benefits and limitations of opportunity centred learning are outlined, together with proposed recommendations for further development in emerging areas of enterprise education.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 45 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Shingairai Grace Masango and Paul Lassalle

There is a growing interest in exploring the interface between international marketing and entrepreneurial opportunities. This paper contributes by defining and…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a growing interest in exploring the interface between international marketing and entrepreneurial opportunities. This paper contributes by defining and elucidating entrepreneurial action in early internationalising software firms and the corresponding emergent international marketing activities. Entrepreneurial action in early internationalising software firms is explored through the operationalisation of a reconceptualised entrepreneurial opportunity construct and the associated entrepreneurial learning processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts an inductive approach, which traces the evolution of five early internationalising propriety software South African firms; from the new venture idea to the establishment of the international entrepreneurial opportunity.

Findings

The findings provide support for entrepreneurial action guided by: prior industry experience, entrepreneurial alertness, opportunity confidence and two levels of entrepreneurial learning; experiential and double-loop learning. Learning by doing allows for the continuous evaluation of the new venture idea leading to the international entrepreneurial opportunity. Market responsiveness and continuous product development resulting in the emergence of the firm's inward international marketing activities constitute the key outcomes of entrepreneurial action.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to a specific technology context, which is young software firms whose inward directed internationalisation activities coalesce around the development of their proprietary software technology.

Originality/value

Based on an original dataset of early internationalising software firms from South Africa, this paper inductively operationalises and conceptualises entrepreneurial action as the combined interaction of four key constructs: contingent effects, attitudes to opportunities, learning by doing and entrepreneurial activities leading to the firm's inward international marketing activities and a diversified international client and end-user base.

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Ghaleb Awad El Refae, Abdoulaye Kaba and Shorouq Eletter

This study aims to investigate and assess the first experience of faculty members and students with distance learning implemented at Al Ain University (AAU) to contain the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate and assess the first experience of faculty members and students with distance learning implemented at Al Ain University (AAU) to contain the spread of Coronavirus or COVID-19. The paper attempted to understand faculty and students’ satisfaction with institutional readiness for distance learning and perception towards opportunities and challenges of distance learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on data collected in March 2020 through an online survey questionnaire from the participants (students = 445, faculty members = 139). The unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) was used in formulating a conceptual framework. The collected data were analysed using several statistical techniques and partial least square structural equation modelling, to test and verify hypotheses.

Findings

The study found that, although faculty members and students expressed high satisfaction with the institutional readiness for distance learning and believed in its opportunities and advantages, they expressed concerns about the challenges facing distance learning. Findings of the study indicated a relationship between the status or college of the participant and perceived opportunities and advantages of distance learning. Hypotheses testing supported the study framework and UTAUT theory by identifying and confirming the impact of perceived opportunities of distance learning on satisfaction with the institutional readiness for distance learning.

Originality/value

The study suggested that non-distance learning institutions should keep offering courses through distance learning to prevent any shortcomings in the future.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Andrea Valéria Steil, Denise de Cuffa, Gabriel Horn Iwaya and Roberto Carlos dos Santos Pacheco

This study aims to identify the relation between perceived learning opportunities, behavioral intentions to voluntarily stay or leave technology organizations and employee…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the relation between perceived learning opportunities, behavioral intentions to voluntarily stay or leave technology organizations and employee retention within these organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a survey of 440 employees of a technology organization.

Findings

Learning opportunities perceived by managers and technicians presented significant positive correlations with the intention to stay and significant negative correlations with the intention to leave the organization. No relation was identified between perceived learning opportunities and manager retention. Among technicians, the correlation between perceived learning opportunities and retention was near zero.

Practical implications

If the organization wants to guarantee the intention of professionals to stay in the organization, the “perceived learning opportunities” indicator should have a similar level of importance as other objective indicators, such as performance and achievement.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to identify relations between perceived learning opportunities and behavioral intention to stay and leave of professionals that work in technology organizations.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Chantal Boomaars, Lyle Yorks and Rajna Shetty

This paper aims to examine whether employability activities are driven by employee learning motives and their perception of learning opportunities.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether employability activities are driven by employee learning motives and their perception of learning opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a closed questionnaire survey from three different profit organizations (N = 405). Hypotheses were tested through hierarchical multiple regression analysis.

Findings

Hierarchical regressions showed that the learning motive “personal development” had a positive relationship with “perceived learning opportunities” and “employability activities,” as hypothesized. “Perceived learning opportunities” did not mediate the relationship between the learning motive “personal development” and “employability activities.” No relationships were found among the learning motives “social pressure,” “perceived learning opportunities” and “employability activities”.

Originality Value

This study is among the first to investigate the motives that employees must engage in individual learning paths. It attempts to predict their self-reported employability activities based on these motives and on the learning opportunities that employees perceive.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Jae Young Lee and Michele C. Welliver

The purpose of this study was to examine the indirect effects of strategic leadership for learning between sales employees’ perceived learning opportunities and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the indirect effects of strategic leadership for learning between sales employees’ perceived learning opportunities and organizational commitment and job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 204 responses from sales employees in a South Korean company were analyzed using path analysis to test the hypothesized model and hypotheses.

Findings

Results of the analysis showed that strategic leadership has a significant indirect effect on the relationship between perceived learning opportunities and job performance and organizational commitment.

Originality/value

The results of this study challenge the belief that providing learning opportunities improves salesperson performance and organizational commitment. The results indicate that the relationship between continuous learning opportunities and performance, as well as between opportunities and organizational commitment, is statistically nonsignificant. However, the authors did find that providing continuous learning opportunities via strategic leadership because learning increases performance and organizational commitment.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 42 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Dixie Ching, Rafi Santo, Christopher Hoadley and Kylie Peppler

This article makes a case for the importance of brokering future learning opportunities to youth as a programmatic goal for informal learning organizations. Such brokering…

Abstract

Purpose

This article makes a case for the importance of brokering future learning opportunities to youth as a programmatic goal for informal learning organizations. Such brokering entails engaging in practices that connect youth to events, programs, internships, individuals and institutions related to their interests to support them beyond the window of a specific program or event. Brokering is especially critical for youth who are new to an area of interest: it helps them develop both a baseline understanding of the information landscape and a social network that will respond to their needs as they pursue various goals. The paper aims to describe three critical levers for brokering well in informal settings: creating learning environments that allow trust to form between youth and educators and enable educators to develop an understanding of a young person’s interests, needs and goals; attending to a young person’s tendency (or not) to reach out to educators after a program is over to solicit assistance; and enabling potential brokers to efficiently locate appropriate future learning opportunities for each young person who approaches them. The authors also include a set of program practices for providers who wish to increase their brokering impact, as well as recommendations geared primarily toward organization leaders. The authors hope that this paper brings clarity and enhanced significance to the practice of brokering as a strategy to support youth pathways toward meaningful futures.

Design/methodology/approach

Insights presented here are the result of a participatory knowledge building and sharing process with a community of after-school providers known as the Mozilla Hive NYC Learning Network. The topic of discussion was how these providers might continue to support young people in their intensive project-based programs after the program was over. The authors of this article, acting as embedded research partners to Hive NYC, contributed insights to these discussions based on ethnographic fieldwork and case studies of high-school-age youth in the Hive NYC context.

Findings

The authors articulate a set of brokering practices and a conceptual model that communicates how brokering might lead to valued long-term outcomes for youth, including increased social capital.

Originality/value

The intent is that information and perspectives from this article will inform youth-serving practice and serve as a catalyst for further conversations and activities geared toward promoting youth pathways of learning and identity development.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2015

Karen Hammerness and Kirsti Klette

In the United States, policy discussions of teacher education in relationship to teacher quality have tended to focus more closely around debates about the nature of…

Abstract

In the United States, policy discussions of teacher education in relationship to teacher quality have tended to focus more closely around debates about the nature of teacher preparation and the need for quality teachers to possess advanced degrees or certification. The field is in need of an array of indicators – a set of powerful, well-researched indicators that can be applied to large public universities as well as small regional private colleges, from university-based programs to “alternative” programs and to more “hybrid” programs. These indicators need to be relevant for teacher certification across a variety of age-ranges and developmental stages. In this chapter, we build on a growing conversation about practice in teacher education and efforts on the part of researchers to identify key features of powerful teacher education. We propose that quality teacher education is designed around a clear and shared vision of good teaching; it is coherent in that it links theory with practice and offers opportunities to learn that are aligned with the vision of good teaching; and it offers opportunities to enact teaching. While these features are supported for the most part by growing consensus in the literature (National Research Council, 2010; NCATE, 2010), there is also an emerging empirical base that provides support for the value of these features as well.

Details

Promoting and Sustaining a Quality Teacher Workforce
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-016-2

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Ali Hajizadeh and Mohammadreza Zali

In order to answer why and how some individuals identify opportunities, the purpose of this paper is to offer a comprehensive framework of key effective factors that…

Abstract

Purpose

In order to answer why and how some individuals identify opportunities, the purpose of this paper is to offer a comprehensive framework of key effective factors that investigates the role of prior knowledge and cognitive characteristics of entrepreneurial alertness and learning in the entrepreneurial opportunities recognition process.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the authors identified key effective factors and developed research hypotheses and conceptual model. Second, the authors considered research methodology including sampling and data collection, measurement model. The third section presents a report of the results from the analysis of the structural model and the hypotheses tests.

Findings

The findings show that all the three factors had positive impact on opportunity recognition. It is also confirmed that prior knowledge has significant impact on entrepreneurial alertness and learning. Finally, the results demonstrate that both entrepreneurial alertness and learning partially mediated the relationship between prior knowledge and opportunity recognition.

Research limitations/implications

Possible effects of other cognitive characteristics such as creativity and innovation can be considered in the model to increase accuracy of the findings. Also, comparative studies with the proposed framework in different industrial domains can be conducted in order to compare the possible differences concerning the role of the factors in opportunity recognition.

Practical implications

By using this model, entrepreneurs will be able to identify and enhance the factors that influence opportunity recognition, thus honing this entrepreneurial ability. Also, this framework can be employed in the field of education to identify opportunity recognition problems in individuals and to foster entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

This paper presents a new integrated model that would examine the impact of key effective factors of entrepreneurial opportunity recognition simultaneously while taking into account the interactions among them.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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