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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Steven Brown, Lisa Chen and Edward O’Donnell

This cross-disciplinary, empirical study aims to examine the phenomenon of organizational opinion leadership. Extant research concerning social capital and both referent…

Abstract

Purpose

This cross-disciplinary, empirical study aims to examine the phenomenon of organizational opinion leadership. Extant research concerning social capital and both referent and expert power suggests that informal opinion leaders within an organizational setting have the ability to influence their co-workers. This study focuses on the transformational leadership characteristics of idealized influence-attributed (charisma) and -behavior (role modeling). The social exchange aspects of the opinion leader–seeker relationship process are examined through an application of dyadic concepts found within leader–member exchange (LMX) theory. This study examines potential outcomes of opinion leader influence, specifically, opinion-seeker perceived organizational support (POS), affective commitment and normative commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines the dynamics of organizational opinion leader (OOL)–organizational opinion seeker (OOS) relationship to determine whether OOLs influence OOSs through role modeling and charisma, captured through the idealized influence aspect of transformational leadership. The OOL–OOS relationship is examined through the lens of LMX, commonly used to examine supervisor–subordinate exchange relationships. This study also examines whether OOLs’ idealized influence and OOL–OOS exchange relationships are related to OOSs’ perceived organizational support (POS) and both affective and normative commitment, and whether POS mediates their influence. Hypotheses are offered and survey data collected from a heterogeneous sample of 646 individuals is examined using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results suggest that idealized influence consistently positively influences the outcomes. LMX-affect, -loyalty and -professional respect influence OOS perceptions of POS. Idealized influence and POS influence OOS affective and normative commitment. LMX-affect influences OOS affective and normative commitment, while LMX-loyalty influences normative commitment. LMX-professional respect slightly influenced OOS affective commitment negatively, suggesting that respect does not engender positive feelings and had no influence on normative commitment.

Research limitations/implications

This interdisciplinary study integrates concepts found within marketing, political science and organizational literature works to shed new light on the informal influence organizational members have on one another, which furthers our understanding of both shared leadership and opinion leadership. This research provides another frame for the concept of shared leadership, suggesting that OOL influence occurs horizontally and vertically within organizations. The overall findings suggest that both the characteristics of opinion leaders and the quality of OOL–OOS relationships matter.

Practical implications

This research highlights the importance of recognizing and enabling organizational members whose opinions are sought by their peers. Organizational opinion leadership exists within organization and influences organizational members’ attitudes and perceptions. Therefore, it is a necessity that organizations understand the phenomenon and guide it, much as organizational culture is guided, so that it produces positive organizational outcomes.

Originality/value

Very little research exists concerning organizational opinion leadership. This study breaks new ground by developing theory, applying accepted constructs to the phenomenon and empirically testing the impact of opinion leadership.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2018

Mohammad G. Nejad and Katayon Javid

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between consumers’ subjective and objective financial literacy (OFL) – the necessary knowledge and skills to make…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between consumers’ subjective and objective financial literacy (OFL) – the necessary knowledge and skills to make effective personal financial decisions – and their effects on opinion leadership and the use of retail financial services.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 486 US participants were surveyed. The demographical profile of the sample roughly resembled that of the USA population.

Findings

On average, consumers with moderate levels of OFL report lower subjective financial literacy (SFL) compared to those with low or high levels of OFL. Moreover, while SFL and opinion leadership are positively correlated, consumers with moderate levels of OFL reported lower opinion leadership compared to those with high or low levels of OFL. The paper introduces financial literacy miscalibration as the discrepancy between consumers’ objective and SFL. Financially illiterate respondents who perceived themselves as financially knowledgeable reported high opinion leadership. Finally, a greater percentage of financially – literate consumers reported owning checking and savings accounts, using online and mobile banking for diverse purposes, and making fewer phone calls to customer services, compared to others.

Research limitations/implications

The paper integrates literature from financial literacy, consumer knowledge, and opinion leadership to explain these findings and to further enhance our theoretical and empirical understanding of objective vs SFL.

Practical implications

The discrepancies between objective and SFL may significantly influence consumers’ financial decisions and the degree to which they expose themselves to the pertinent risks. The paper discusses implications for public policy makers as well as marketing managers and researchers.

Originality/value

The study is the first to empirically explore the research questions following the conceptual development.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2020

Duygu Akdevelioglu and Selcan Kara

This paper aims to examine innovativeness and extraversion as antecedents of perceived and social media opinion leadership in different country-level contexts and explore…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine innovativeness and extraversion as antecedents of perceived and social media opinion leadership in different country-level contexts and explore how these antecedents influence product adoption differently.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey method was used to collect data from Turkey and the USA. A total of 415 respondents participated in two studies, and data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

This research shows that innovativeness affects perceived opinion leadership, whereas extraversion affects social media opinion leadership, and these effects are moderated by country-level differences.

Practical implications

Tthis research provides strategic information strategic information on how to identify and target influencers in social media across countries. This paper has implications for marketers who are trying to find influential consumers to increase new product adoption. Social media opinion leaders are important seeding points, because they actively initiate new product adoption for other consumers. Marketers should create strategies that are in line with the country’s cultural orientation in addition to personal/psychological traits.

Social implications

This research provides valuable information to better explain the consumers’ adoption of technological products and the factors affecting this process in the context of social media. Specifically, this paper identifies strategies to use cultural differences across countries (i.e. Turkey versus the USA) and personality traits (i.e., innovativeness and extraversion) in the adoption of new products.

Originality/value

This paper extends prior literature on opinion leadership by uncovering consumer dynamics internationally, which are known to influence social media use. Specifically, by examining the effect of innovativeness and extraversion on opinion leadership in different countries, this research contributes to the literature on new product adoption and has implications for effectively identifying influencers in social media.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Jiyun Kang and Haesun Park‐Poaps

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between fashion innovativeness/opinion leadership and utilitarian/hedonic shopping motivations. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between fashion innovativeness/opinion leadership and utilitarian/hedonic shopping motivations. This study seeks to develop a better understanding of fashion leadership and determine the primary shopping motivations associated with fashion leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was completed by a total of 150 students at a large university in the southeastern USA. Multiple regression analyses, MANCOVA, and ANCOVA were employed to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicated that fashion innovativeness was significantly related to various hedonic shopping motivations; fashion innovativeness was positively associated with adventure and idea shopping motivations, whereas it was negatively associated with value shopping motivation. Fashion opinion leadership was positively associated with utilitarian shopping motivation.

Practical implications

The results of the study help to suggest various marketing and retailing strategies to stimulate fashion innovative behaviors through adventurous, stimulating, and up‐to‐date new fashions. They also suggest that fashion opinion leadership could be activated by focusing proper shopping environments or advertising on information/features for cognitive stimulation.

Originality/value

The study investigated a direct relationship between fashion leadership and shopping motivations for the first time. The findings of the study strengthen academic research on fashion leadership by identifying pre‐positioned shopping motivations that trigger fashion leadership, as well as practical applications.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Jie Zhang and Wei-Na Lee

Market mavenism and opinion leadership are two important consumer influential concepts in marketing communication literature. The purpose of this paper is to explore two…

Abstract

Purpose

Market mavenism and opinion leadership are two important consumer influential concepts in marketing communication literature. The purpose of this paper is to explore two overarching research questions. First, can we separate market mavenism from opinion leadership in China? The answer to this question would solve an important issue of targeting in marketing communication. Second, if market mavenism is indeed distinctive from opinion leadership, are market mavenism and opinion leadership determined by same or different factors in China? The answer of this question would help determine how to reach each type of consumer influential and add knowledge to market segmentation.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted to test the hypotheses. In total, 316 Chinese respondents completed this survey.

Findings

The results were illuminating: market mavenism and opinion leadership were indeed distinctive yet related concepts in China. Monochronicity, altruism, price-value consciousness, and income significantly influenced market mavenism after controlling for all other variables while monochronicity, price-value consciousness, and age significantly predicted opinion leadership after controlling for all other variables.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides a richer picture of market mavenism and opinion leadership in the Chinese market.

Originality/value

This study helps scholars and professionals efficiently and effectively reach each type of consumer influential.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Robin A. Coulter, Lawrence F. Feick and Linda L. Price

Research conducted in the early 1990s in Hungary indicated a lack of knowledgeable and influential personal sources in the cosmetics product category. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Research conducted in the early 1990s in Hungary indicated a lack of knowledgeable and influential personal sources in the cosmetics product category. The purpose of this article is to examine women cosmetics opinion leaders in Hungary approximately ten years into the country’s transition to a market economy. Because of the evolution of the cosmetics market over the past decade and Hungarian women’s increased involvement with cosmetics, we expected to see the emergence of opinion leadership in the product category. Survey data from 340 Hungarian women indicate that the incidence of cosmetics opinion leadership and self‐reported product knowledge is lower than what we might expect in more established market economies. Nonetheless, we found the relationships between cosmetics opinion leadership in Hungary and antecedent and consequent variables are similar to what we would expect in more established market economies. We discuss the implications of these results for marketing managers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 36 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Valerie Hlavaty, Shelley S. Harp and Patricia E. Horridge

The purposes of the study were to classify South Korean female apparel shoppers into fashion opinion leadership groups and to develop group profdes by lifestyle…

Abstract

The purposes of the study were to classify South Korean female apparel shoppers into fashion opinion leadership groups and to develop group profdes by lifestyle characteristics, store selection attributes, clothing purchase influences, and sociodemographics. Data (N=271) were collected by questionnaires distributed to 300 South Korean consumers chosen to participate in the investigation. By cluster analysis of the Fashion Opinion Leadership (FOL) scale, four female consumer groups were identified as traditionoriented/culture conscious (29.4 per cent), eco‐nomic‐oriented/price conscious (15.8 per cent), convenience‐oriented/time conscious (28.7 per cent), and appearance‐oriented/fashion conscious (26.1 per cent). Scale reliability with the inter‐national sample was determined by a Cronbach alpha. Groups were compared on the profile descriptors through MANOVA and chisquare statistics. Results indicated that fashion opinion leadership is a base for segmenting South Korean female apparel shoppers. This study suggests ways knowledge about the consumer groups identified can be incorporated into marketing and retail strategies.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

Ronald E. Goldsmith and Ronald A. Clark

This paper aims to test hypothesized relationships of consumer need for uniqueness, attention to social comparison information, status consumption, and role‐relaxed…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test hypothesized relationships of consumer need for uniqueness, attention to social comparison information, status consumption, and role‐relaxed consumption with opinion leadership and opinion seeking for new fashionable clothing.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed 598 consumers between the ages of 18 and 83 years using a self‐administered questionnaire. Correlation and linear regression analyses showed that all four independent variables were related to both dependent variables.

Findings

Consumer need for uniqueness was related positively to opinion leadership, but negatively with opinion seeking for younger consumers. Attention to social comparison information was positively related more highly to opinion seeking than to opinion leadership. Status consumption had the largest overall positive association, followed by role‐relaxed consumption, which was negatively related.

Research limitations/implications

Some findings confirm earlier studies and some break new ground. The findings are limited to US consumers and the convenience sample. Other limitations include the specific measures used and the cross‐section survey method precludes making causal statements. The effects of other, unmeasured variables could be assessed.

Practical implications

Apparel marketers seeking to encourage opinion leaders to promote their lines of new clothing might devise appeals emphasizing the social significance and status of the new fashions and how they bestow uniqueness on their wearers.

Originality/value

The study not only confirms previous findings regarding consumer need for uniqueness and attention to social comparison information, but expands the description of motivating factors with status and role‐relaxed consumption.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Laurent Bertrandias and Ronald E. Goldsmith

To model the relationships between consumer need for uniqueness and attention to social comparison information with fashion opinion leadership and fashion opinion seeking.

Abstract

Purpose

To model the relationships between consumer need for uniqueness and attention to social comparison information with fashion opinion leadership and fashion opinion seeking.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 201 US undergraduate students were surveyed and standard scales were used to measure consumer need for uniqueness, attention to social comparison information, fashion opinion leadership, and fashion opinion seeking.

Findings

Both consumer need for uniqueness and attention to social comparison information were positively related to fashion opinion leadership. Attention to social comparison information was also positively related to fashion opinion seeking, but consumer need for uniqueness was negatively related to fashion opinion seeking.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to US consumers and the convenience sample. Other limitations include the specific measures used, and the cross‐sectional survey method prevents one from making causal statements. The effects of other, unmeasured variables could not be assessed.

Practical implications

Apparel marketers seeking to encourage opinion leaders to promote their lines of new clothing might devise appeals emphasizing the social significance of the new products and how they bestow uniqueness on their owners. Such appeals might be more effective than those not stressing these psychological motivations. Appeals to consumers more likely to seek than to give opinions might also stress the social significance of the clothing, but appeals to uniqueness might not be effective with these consumers. Perhaps a belongingness appeal would be more effective.

Originality/value

These psychological concepts have not been studied very much in the clothing/fashion product domain. They give new insights into the psychology of clothing opinion leaders and opinion seekers.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1980

P.W. Turnbull and A. Meenaghan

Declares that diffusion (a term employed to describe the process whereby an innovation or a new idea or practice spreads through a social system over time) is a summary…

Abstract

Declares that diffusion (a term employed to describe the process whereby an innovation or a new idea or practice spreads through a social system over time) is a summary term used to embrace studies which trace the process of diffusion, the process of adoption and the patterns of influence involved. Acknowledges that even allowing for low involvement of marketing research in diffusion, marketing management's interest in this area can be guided and controlled. States that information is diffused through some form of communication channel – these may be one of two types: vertical channels, which exist if ‘there is a meaningful difference in the interests, social status, demographic or economic characteristics of the communication units’; and horizontal channels, which occur where communications flows among members of groups with similar interests and characteristics – these groups may be work groups, social groups, etc. Investigates sources of information and influence – in particular the two basic ones of: impersonal sources via the mass media; and personal sources involving the opinion leader in a two‐step flow of communication. Closes by discussing the implications of the two‐step flow for marketing in depth, with recommendations.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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