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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

William F. Walsh

Compstat is a goal‐oriented strategic management process that uses technology, operational strategy and managerial accountability to structure the delivery of police…

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5543

Abstract

Compstat is a goal‐oriented strategic management process that uses technology, operational strategy and managerial accountability to structure the delivery of police services and provide safety to communities. This process originated with the New York City Police Department and is now being adapted by many law enforcement agencies throughout the USA. It thus represents an emerging police organizational management paradigm. This paper analyses the evolution of police management techniques and the emergence of this new paradigm. It concludes with an assessment of the organizational changes required for the adaptation of this process.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Denis Travaillé and Gérald Naro

This paper aims to focus on the role of management control function in the strategies of corporate social responsibility adopted by companies. Since the years 1980/1990…

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1287

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the role of management control function in the strategies of corporate social responsibility adopted by companies. Since the years 1980/1990, multidimensional models appeared that give an integrated or balanced representation of performance. In parallel, facing the challenges of sustainable development (SD) and taking them into account in the management of companies, the concept of overall performance has developed. But, at the same time, research based on neo-institutional sociology suggests on the contrary the existence of a loose coupling between a management control oriented towards the search for legitimacy and the internal practices of management control.

Design/methodology/approach

The study took place between 2010 and 2015. In 2010, the authors conducted a primary exploratory survey of a sample of 40 management controllers. The study was continued in 2015 by a survey of 60 management accountants. The questionnaires were administered electronically. Sorting and cross-sorting, along with tests of independence based on the χ2 test, were carried out.

Findings

The results of the surveys have allowed us to observe the absence of significant links between proactive strategies displayed by companies in SD and the missions and instruments of management control. These latter would focus solely on measurement, monitoring and reporting of an exclusively economic and financial performance.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study among French controllers. This study could be deepened by an international survey of a larger sample and by case studies with different managers involved in SD steering.

Practical implications

The study highlights the need to involve management controllers in steering SD.

Social implications

While the literature in management control highlights the role of management accountants in the strategic alignment of SD, this study has shown the weakness of this role.

Originality/value

The article shows the weak involvement of management controllers in the implementation of SD, while the latter would want to become more involved in the steering of SD.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Rob Dekkers

The theories of transaction‐cost economics, the resource‐based view and the core competencies approach have been used extensively to justify the rationale behind strategic…

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6910

Abstract

Purpose

The theories of transaction‐cost economics, the resource‐based view and the core competencies approach have been used extensively to justify the rationale behind strategic decisions on outsourcing, but their validity has not been investigated yet in comparative empirical research. Additionally, no study has examined the operational effects of these decisions in‐depth. The purpose of this paper is to fill these two gaps in the academic literature.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review confirms the existence of these gaps and informs hypotheses based on the three theories. Additionally, the model for continuous decision making on outsourcing is used to systematically collect data from five cases studies. The cases – all make‐to‐order or engineering‐to‐order – have been analysed on effects for operational performance and control resulting from strategic decision making on outsourcing.

Findings

From this evaluation, it appears that these companies perform weakly on the control of the outsourced activities. Furthermore, it seems that the (manufacturing) strategy is disconnected from outsourcing practices and that outsourcing hardly contributes to competitive advantage. Moreover, from some of the case studies it appears that the decision for strategic outsourcing is irreversible. Finally, traditional criteria and behaviour during decision making prevail, i.e. a cost‐driven perspective, which does not address contemporary challenges.

Research limitations/implications

Despite being explorative and based on only five cases, these findings indicate that strategic decision making on outsourcing based on the three theories insufficiently accounts for operational issues that emerge later during manufacturing; it might be necessary to revise the theoretical base for outsourcing to include management of outsourced manufacturing activities.

Practical implications

The findings imply also that managers in companies, in any case those firms that operate on the basis of make‐to‐order or engineering‐to‐order, should be less “rushed” into strategic decision making on outsourcing that has adverse effects. Rather, outsourcing requires integral decision making in contrast to factual decision making that displayed signs of bounded rationality (particularly expressed through the focus on cost savings).

Social implications

The dominant, one‐sided view of the cost perspectives contributes to the notion that the shareholders' interests for short‐term profitability conflict with long‐term organisational health (apparent through the impact on operational management of outsourcing activities).

Originality/value

Stakeholders involved in strategic decision making might use this research to evaluate fundamentally decisions that cover outsourcing. At the same time, for consultants and practitioners it offers insight that is complementary to the often one‐sided strategic decision making with its focus on cost reductions. Furthermore, this paper demonstrates the limited validity of current theories that underpin strategic decision making on outsourcing and provides an impetus for academics to develop more appropriate theory.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Baris Yalabik, Mickey Howard and Sinéad Roden

This paper seeks to present a teaching tool (the Innovation Game) which aims to demonstrate the challenges of developing an effective innovation strategy in the context of…

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3549

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to present a teaching tool (the Innovation Game) which aims to demonstrate the challenges of developing an effective innovation strategy in the context of new product development. The goal of the game is to enable participants to experience how strategic and operational choices made in relation to innovation strategy are interrelated and how these choices can impact on new product development success. Specifically the paper aims to explore the impact of choices made in relation to capability accumulation, capacity management and product‐portfolio management.

Design/methodology/approach

After presenting the learning objectives for the game with the support of relevant literature, the paper describes the design of the game and the context in which it was played. The paper reviews feedback (learning outcomes) from formal reflective post‐game sessions with participants. This feedback indicates that the learning objectives have been satisfied.

Findings

Through experiential learning and reflective practice participants learn, for example, that: capabilities need to match the intended strategy; investing in production capacity can be leveraged to aid negotiations with competitors, or it can be used as a bully tactic; and, it sometimes is better to be an R&D “follower” rather than a “leader”. The participants also learn that the alignment of operational and strategic choices is necessary in order to leverage success in developing new products but that the actions and strategies of competitors have a direct impact also and need to be considered carefully.

Research limitations/implications

The teaching tool adopts a participative game playing and reflective learning approach to introduce into class some of the real‐life competitive dynamics of managing new product development and decision making normally confined to the boardroom. While it is argued that the game demonstrates the challenges of developing successful strategy, the game is set in a static context in which certain external contingencies are not accounted for.

Originality/value

Demonstration of the importance of strategy to new product development is particularly difficult because of the longitudinal nature of product development and the tacit nature of the decision making process which often transpires long after projects are completed. The paper posits that the value of the Innovation Game is in reflecting on it as a practical, interactive tool that helps participants appreciate the challenges inherent in strategic and operational decision making related to innovation strategy and new product development success.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 32 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Pat McAllister

Focussing on the UK’s institutional real estate universe, this paper analyses variations in the operational management of real estate investment portfolios. For the main…

Abstract

Purpose

Focussing on the UK’s institutional real estate universe, this paper analyses variations in the operational management of real estate investment portfolios. For the main categories of institutional investors, the key tasks in real estate operational management, and the ways in which these tasks are typically bundled and categorised by investment managers are reviewed. Three broad operational management models are outlined. Case studies of real estate operational management models in practice are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach is primarily descriptive, drawing upon illustrative investor case studies.

Findings

A range of operating models are identified for managing real estate investment portfolios. Specialists real estate investors tend to have highly vertically integrated operating models viewing most operational management functions as core operational capabilities. Multi-asset owners tend to have a vertically disintegrated operating model outsourcing fund, asset, property and facilities management. Investing institutions such as fund houses and specialist real estate investment advisors seem to have converged upon a common hybrid operating model with high margin, analytical functions such as fund and asset management being insourced and low margin, routine functions such as property and facilities management being outsourced.

Originality/value

Despite the size of the global, institutional real estate investment universe (estimated by DTZ to be worth more than USD 13.6 trillion in 2015), the topic of how (and how effectively) these assets are managed by institutional investors has attracted very little attention from the real estate research community. This paper provides some initial analysis and insights into operational management models for real estate investment portfolios in the contemporary real estate investment management landscape.

Details

Property Management, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Manal Yunis, Joo Jung and Shouming Chen

The purpose is to examine the role of TQM in a strategy‐TQM‐performance model. More specifically, it seeks to investigate whether TQM has a driving role in the formation…

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6610

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to examine the role of TQM in a strategy‐TQM‐performance model. More specifically, it seeks to investigate whether TQM has a driving role in the formation of strategy or has a mediating effect in the strategy‐performance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was used to collect data. The instrument was assessed for its validity and reliability. Structural equation modelling was employed.

Findings

TQM influences strategy formulation process and it is a dynamic resource that contributes to the achievement of a sustainable competitive advantage. In addition, soft TQM has a higher impact than hard TQM on competitive strategy formulation and on performance.

Research limitations/implications

The model developed and tested can be enriching to the TQM, strategic management, and quality management fields. Future research is recommended to use methods other than self‐report questionnaires and to account for certain behavioral factors that can influence the relationships investigated in the study.

Practical implications

The findings provide insights to the need to integrate TQM with the various stages of the strategy formulation process, with an emphasis on the soft elements of TQM, including customer satisfaction, management and leadership, and employee relations.

Originality/value

Despite the remarkable contributions of existent research, there is a lack of substantive research that examines the relationship between the hard and soft components of TQM on one hand and the two types of competitive strategy – differentiation and cost leadership – on the other. This gap is filled by this study.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Katrina Bradley and Peter Moles

The effect of exchange rate movements on firm value is important to firms engaged in international transactions. These accounting exposures can be managed using financial…

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3351

Abstract

The effect of exchange rate movements on firm value is important to firms engaged in international transactions. These accounting exposures can be managed using financial instruments. However, the competitive or strategic effects that create economic exposure require firms to adopt a strategic approach. This paper reports on the extent to which large, publicly‐listed UK firms adopt a strategic approach to the management of exchange rate risk. Unlike earlier studies, the results indicate the widespread use of a range of operational hedging techniques. A significant proportion of firms are also found to incorporate currency risk management as a factor in decisions made by their operating departments. However, the study also indicated considerable variation in the application of operational techniques between firms and industry sectors.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 28 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Harri Haapasalo, Kari Ingalsuo and Timo Lenkkeri

The purpose of this paper is to find a means of connecting strategic management and operative performance measurement.

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4170

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find a means of connecting strategic management and operative performance measurement.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on the balanced scorecard (BSC), its levels of use and utilization, the influence of specific features, the most used metrics and features of successful implementation of the BSC in the energy sector. The paper is based on empirical interviews with 16 locally operating energy companies and business units of larger corporations. BSC is a wide spread strategic management system which originated in the early 1990s. The aim of the BSC is to facilitate in depth discussion about a company's vision, strategy and critical success factors and translate them into specific measures and objectives in action.

Findings

The study shows that maintaining a vision and a strategy has not been very prevalent in Finnish electricity companies. However, the deregulation of the energy markets in Finland, from the mid‐1990s, has increased the competition and made maintaining a strategy all the more important. Adjustment to this deregulation and the large number of different businesses are special features of the electricity sector. It can be concluded that benchmarking on other industries, where BSC has been in use, leads to better results faster in the energy sector. However, it has to be noted that strategy and management have to be seen as a unique set of activities. In the construction phase of the BSC, the process of searching for the metrics is more important than finding them.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights into linking strategy into operational management.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Charles Y.J. Cheah and Michael J. Garvin

A new conceptual model for corporate strategy in the construction industry is presented that is derived from two principal inputs. First, the fundamental components of the…

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5736

Abstract

A new conceptual model for corporate strategy in the construction industry is presented that is derived from two principal inputs. First, the fundamental components of the model are based upon observations drawn from an empirical study of 24 international firms competing in global engineering and construction markets. Second, the accumulated intellect of different strategic theories developed over four decades of strategic management research helps to fortify the model with theoretical propositions and establish linkages among the model's basic components. The proposed model is comprised of seven strategic fields, two organizational mechanisms and a boundary notion that divides a firm's internal setting from its external environment. The model's development leads to two central propositions: strategic fields and organizational mechanisms should function as variables to react with external dynamics, and the interaction of these variables consequently promotes higher order differentiation factors that will enhance the strategic outlook of a firm.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Diane Mollenkopf, Ivan Russo and Robert Frankel

The purpose of this paper is to consider theory development related to returns management within supply chain strategy. The marketing/logistics relationship relative to…

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8201

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider theory development related to returns management within supply chain strategy. The marketing/logistics relationship relative to the returns management process is investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded theory qualitative methodology. Managers in five Italian firms, across marketing and logistics roles, at strategic and operational levels were interviewed.

Findings

Four key findings emerged: strong evidence exists that strategic goals and policies are being implemented; cross‐functional integration within the firms is broader than was expected; the more integrated firms deal better with external factors influencing the returns management process; and supply chain orientation – including forward and reverse supply chain flows – is linked to effective returns management.

Research limitations/implications

Firms were pre‐selected for participation, due to researcher's time constraints. Additionally, given the pan‐European approach to many supply chains, this Italian research needs to be replicated in other (western and eastern) European settings to determine the robustness of the factors posited to be important to the returns management process. Finally, other functional areas beyond marketing and logistics are involved in returns management, and will be more formally incorporated into future research.

Practical implications

Returns management – increasingly being recognized as affecting competitive positioning – provides an important link between marketing and logistics. The broad nature of its cross‐functional impact suggests that firms would benefit by improving internal integration efforts. In particular, a firm's ability to react to and plan for the influence of external factors on the returns management process is improved by such internal integration.

Originality/value

Returns management has been under‐represented in much of the logistics and supply chain literature. This paper represents the first stage of an on‐going research project aimed at providing a theoretical framework for understanding the returns management process within a firm's supply chain strategy.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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