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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Norliza Katuk, Ku Ruhana Ku‐Mahamud, Norita Norwawi and Safaai Deris

The purpose of this paper is to present the utilization of a web‐based support system for flood response operation in Malaysia. The system is intentionally designed to…

2235

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the utilization of a web‐based support system for flood response operation in Malaysia. The system is intentionally designed to improve process and data management towards providing prompt and effective response to victims.

Design/methodology/approach

The implementation of the research adopted the knowledge acquisition method for implementing expert systems in organizations. The methodology consists of four phases of activities which are planning for knowledge acquisition, knowledge extraction, knowledge analysis, and knowledge verification.

Findings

The findings include the architecture of the web‐based support system for flood response operation which is presented in the form of conceptual and software models. The architecture of web‐based support systems for flood response operation can assist the flood management related agencies in managing and maintaining data related to floods. It also allows them to monitor the current situation of flood‐related matters.

Practical implications

Web‐based support systems for flood response operation is expected to improve the overall aspect of flood response operation by providing electronic features which facilitate the flood response process and data management. In future, expert systems for flood response operations is one of the enhancements to the current architecture.

Originality/value

This paper presents the architecture of a web‐based support system for flood response operation in Malaysia. The proposed architecture is beneficial for the flood management related agencies in order to plan further improvements in the current procedure for flood response.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Jungwon Yeo and Louise K. Comfort

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the large-scale flood response coordination across sectors and jurisdictions, investigating the characteristics and gaps of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the large-scale flood response coordination across sectors and jurisdictions, investigating the characteristics and gaps of the 2011 Thailand flood response operations.

Design/methodology/approach

The large-scale flood response coordination was measured as an inter-organizational network. An extensive content analysis of news reports was conducted to identify the participating organizations and relationships among them that emerged during the initial flood response operations. Social network analysis was used to examine the patterns and gaps of coordination among the organizations.

Findings

The research identified three major gaps that might weaken the response coordination. First, the coordination structure was highly fragmented with many isolated actors. Second, the benefit of inter-sector relationships was not well leveraged in the system due to weak reciprocal relationships across sectors. Third, provincial level organizations did not serve as a strong liaison between local actors (cities) and national actors.

Practical implications

Based on the findings, the research offers suggestions to improve the performance of response coordination in recurring flood disasters.

Originality/value

This study is distinctive in its examination of structural characteristics of large-scale, inter-sector and multi-jurisdictional flood response coordination in Thailand. Previous studies have explored how citizens were organized and responded to flood disasters at the local level, and measured indicators or causes of response resilience at the provincial level system. Yet, studies examining the patterns of coordination structure among response organizations across all affected-jurisdictional authorities and sectors have been lacking.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

71

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Dennis Parker, Maureen Fordham, Sylvia Tunstall and Anne‐Michelle Ketteridge

Discusses the results of evaluations of flood forecasting, warningand response systems in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.Reveals that in England and Wales…

1071

Abstract

Discusses the results of evaluations of flood forecasting, warning and response systems in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Reveals that in England and Wales flood warning systems often underperform. Despite technical sophistication and their elevation to high priority in central government′s flood defence strategy, arrangements for flood warnings are now under considerable stress because of lack of agreement over organizational roles and responsibilities. Legal ambiguities, funding difficulties and ideological positions lie behind these problems. Flood warning systems are developing in Scotland, and there is now a “fledgling” system in Northern Ireland, but both lag behind England and Wales. Examines implications for the future.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

Mikio Ishiwatari

This study aims to demonstrate the effectiveness of investment in flood protection by analyzing the flood disaster caused by Typhoon Hagibis in Japan in October 2019. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to demonstrate the effectiveness of investment in flood protection by analyzing the flood disaster caused by Typhoon Hagibis in Japan in October 2019. The typhoon severely damaged the central and eastern Japan regions and threatened the Greater Tokyo area.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines flood risks in the Greater Tokyo area and reviews how the flood protection systems functioned to protect Tokyo from the typhoon. The hydrological data of rainfall and water levels at major rivers and the operation records of flood control facilities are collected and analyzed.

Findings

The study’s major finding is that the flood protection system succeeded in protecting the Greater Tokyo area from flooding. Typhoon Hagibis maintained its power until landing because of climate change and caused record-breaking rainfall. In a worst-case scenario, thousands of people could have died and hundreds of billions USD worth of assets could have been lost in Tokyo.

Practical implications

The paper describes the actual effects of the flood protection systems, consisting of dams constructed upstream, reservoirs midstream and diversion channels downstream. Thus, this study’s findings directly relate to practical implications for other countries and cities, which face flood risks under a changing climate.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of investing in flood protection by examining actual disasters and providing detailed descriptions of flood protection systems.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Romana Berariu, Christian Fikar, Manfred Gronalt and Patrick Hirsch

The purpose of this paper is to present a system dynamics (SD) model that allows one to simulate resource deployment to fulfill increasing needs for commodities such as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a system dynamics (SD) model that allows one to simulate resource deployment to fulfill increasing needs for commodities such as food and other consumables during disaster situations. The focus is on managing a suddenly increased demand (hoarding behavior) of an affected population under restricted transport conditions. The model aims to support decision makers by fostering comprehension of the systemic behavior and interdependencies of those complex settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Through literature review and case study analyses the SD model was established and implemented with STELLA 10.1.1.

Findings

The needs of relief units for response operations and supply of evacuees in the affected region result in conflicting needs under limited transport conditions during disaster situations. Therefore, uncertainties and dynamic parameters as, e.g., occurring delays, limited information, or delivery constraints and their influence on resource deployment under a sudden demand, have been identified and incorporated in this work. The authors found that an oscillating behavior within the system is possible to occur and is more intensified in case of regarding the additional needs of evacuees and relief units.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the high level of abstraction, it is not possible to incorporate all influencing variables in the SD model. Therefore, the authors focused on the most important ones with regard to the model objective.

Practical implications

To focus on awareness raising is of importance for decision makers in the context of disaster management. Furthermore, the authors found that the oscillating behavior is more irregular in case of assuming a higher increase rate of the water gauge than if a low increase rate is assumed.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, none of the work already done refers to providing a flood-prone area with commodities under consideration of a sudden demand, by applying the SD approach. The presented model contributes on the generation of systemic insights of resource deployment under consideration of conflicting needs in times of a river flood to support decision makers in those situations.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

36

Abstract

Details

Facilities, vol. 17 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

44

Abstract

Details

Property Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Manish Trehan and Vijay Kapoor

This paper seeks to focus on the TQM journey of MilkFed, a major milk‐producing cooperative in the state of Punjab in Northern India. It aims to demonstrate how TQM…

2051

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to focus on the TQM journey of MilkFed, a major milk‐producing cooperative in the state of Punjab in Northern India. It aims to demonstrate how TQM principles have been used to create an organisation‐wide environment of continuous improvement in a cooperative sector organisation that spread into tradition and ways of doing business in spite of facing numerous challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

MilkFed hired Punjab Technical University's School of TQM and Entrepreneurship (PGSTE) to create an organisation‐wide system of continuous improvement. PGSTE consultants prepared a road‐map for TQM implementation. In the first phase, 14 teams comprising 76 senior/middle level executives (one team from each of Milkfed's 14 plants/units) were trained in the structured application of TQM principles and the project‐by‐project improvement through a series of workshops. Each team implemented an improvement project, which was facilitated by the consultants.

Findings

MilkFed has saved USD 0.89 million per annum which amounted to more than 25 per cent of its net profit. There is a tremendous scope for multiplying the gains through horizontal deployment of learning across various plants and units. Intangible benefits included transformation in attitude of employees, creation of team culture, breakdown of departmental silos and tremendous improvement in labour‐management relations.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that the project‐by‐project approach used in conjunction with the basic 7 QC tools is an excellent approach for building a culture of continuous improvement. It has many important lessons for organisations, which are starting their quality improvement journey.

Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Isaac Sakyi Damoah

This study explores the critical success factors (CSFs) in humanitarian supply chain management (HSCM) by focussing on flood disaster management (FDM) in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the critical success factors (CSFs) in humanitarian supply chain management (HSCM) by focussing on flood disaster management (FDM) in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth semi-structured interview and questionnaire surveys in a sequential data collection approach were used to collect data from definitive stakeholders of humanitarian organisations. The data was analysed using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factors analysis (CFA) and structural equation modelling (SEM) techniques.

Findings

Seventy-four factors were identified as success factors of HSCM of flood disaster management. However, 41 of these factors were statistically significant and considered as critical. In descending order, these factors relate to management practices, education and training, stakeholder involvement and cooperation, infrastructure, innovation and technology, materials and resources, administrative practices, socio-cultural and economic. Whilst some factors are internal to the humanitarian organisations, others are external factors that are beyond the control of humanitarian organisations.

Research limitations/implications

Even though this study offers empirical results that could guide policymakers in their decision-making about humanitarian operations, care needs to be taken since the data is within one country and within a specific disaster context – hence, policymakers need to consider the local contextual dynamics. Future studies could look at different disasters context to make a comparative analysis of various types of disaster operations.

Practical implications

Institutions such as World Health Organization, Red Cross organisations and UN seeking to curbs global-warming-related disasters and the reduction of the effects of flood disaster can use findings as a guide during the formulation of HSCM policies and strategies.

Originality/value

Unlike previous studies of humanitarian operations that focussed extensively on theoretical expositions, simulations, conceptual frameworks and models, this present study offers empirical evidence of humanitarian operations in the context of SCM. Further, by highlighting on the HSCM CSFs, this study contributes to disaster reduction and their effects on humanity in the context of FDM. This research could be used as guide by governments and FDM organisations to make informed decisions on SCM areas to focus the most during FDM.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

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