Search results

1 – 10 of over 4000
Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Simone Fanelli, Chiara Carolina Donelli, Antonello Zangrandi and Isabella Mozzoni

Opera houses have been traditionally publicly financed in many western countries. However, today many opera houses are facing serious financial troubles, due to the recent…

Abstract

Purpose

Opera houses have been traditionally publicly financed in many western countries. However, today many opera houses are facing serious financial troubles, due to the recent financial crisis. There is thus a widespread public debate on measures to ensure agency efficiency for performing arts organizations. Focusing on the reform implemented recently in Italy, which submitted opera houses that had severe financial difficulties to a recovery plan and encouraged forms of collaborative governance (CG), the purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of CG on the performance of the arts sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple case studies are used, on longitudinal data from multiple sources over a period of up to five years, in order to triangulate the narrative of financial and artistic performance and ensure trustworthiness. The study thus spans the period before the Bray Law came into force (2013) and covers the entire period in which recovery plans were implemented.

Findings

The analysis explores how opera houses are building sustainability for themselves and the community in terms of financial and artistic performance through CG. Various forms of CG adopted yielded positive results. Furthermore, more robust forms of CG generated better performance, especially from a financial point of view.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the limited knowledge of CG in the non-profit sector by bridging the fields of agency performance and CG. It discusses how the introduction of forms of CG can build up long-term sustainability, solving the dilemma of how to achieve financial equilibrium without compromising artistic quality, focusing on the case of opera houses, which are notably affected by Baumol’s cost disease.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Adrian Guachalla

This paper aims to identify the factors that foster an interest in opera and Opera Houses as a specific form of cultural capital and how the Opera House tourist constructs…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the factors that foster an interest in opera and Opera Houses as a specific form of cultural capital and how the Opera House tourist constructs images of destinations from the cognitive, affective and conative dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

A social constructivist methodology was adopted, and data was captured through online qualitative questionnaires from 226 Opera House tourists using a simple random sampling approach. These enquired about the development of their interest in opera and Opera Houses and the influence this exerts on their destination image formation process.

Findings

This form of cultural capital is mainly developed by exposure to art forms through family, social and further reference groups. Opera Houses project cognitive images of cosmopolitanism, affective images of social belonging and conative images of further opportunities to experience culture and leisure fostering destination loyalty and place attachment.

Research limitations

Productions of both opera and ballet are staged at Opera Houses, opening avenues for further research on either the opera or ballet tourist markets specifically using case studies across the ample spectrum of Opera Houses around the world.

Practical implications

In addition to the visual appeal and quality of cultural produce, tourism practitioners can use an Opera House’s projected affective images of social cohesion and togetherness to attract the Opera House tourist market. Opera Houses enrich a destination’s visual and cultural landscapes, cementing the need to preserve and promote their contributions to the destination’s cultural identity.

Social implications

This study highlights the need for cultural policy and audience development strategies that cultivate this type of cultural capital resulting in demand for and supply of cultural products that in turn stimulate the development of this niche cultural tourism market segment.

Originality/value

To the best of author’s knowledge, this is the first study that has approached the Opera House tourist from the destination image formation context.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Sara Delamont and Paul Atkinson

In this chapter the authors describe an ethnographic project that the authors were never able to undertake. It was concerned with the use of opera (such as those of…

Abstract

In this chapter the authors describe an ethnographic project that the authors were never able to undertake. It was concerned with the use of opera (such as those of Mozart) in the construction of cultural heritage in a number of European cities, including Prague and Vienna. The authors would also have undertaken fieldwork to study the local use of music and opera as tourist attractions. The authors would have studied operatic tourism as an example of secular, cultural pilgrimage. It would, therefore, have been a contribution to the sociology of culture, heritage and tourism.

Details

The Lost Ethnographies: Methodological Insights from Projects that Never Were
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-773-7

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Stories and Lessons from the World's Leading Opera, Orchestra Librarians, and Music Archivists, Volume 2: Europe and Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-659-9

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Peggy Gaugy

47

Abstract

Details

Electronic Resources Review, vol. 3 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Arturo Cruz, Vaughan Coffey, Tommy H.T. Chan and Miljenka Perovic

This paper aims to set out the role of engineers in heritage conservation and investigates and evaluates the proposed available tools, technology and innovations that are…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to set out the role of engineers in heritage conservation and investigates and evaluates the proposed available tools, technology and innovations that are currently available in the civil engineering sector that can be applied in heritage conservation.

Design/methodology/approach

As society has become more aware of the grandeur of heritage spaces and structures, there is increasing pressure to preserve historic buildings. But, it is the economic cost of maintaining this important heritage legacy that has become the prime consideration of every state in Australia. Dedicated intelligent monitoring systems supplementing the traditional building inspections will enable the involved and interested stakeholders to carry out not only timely reactive response, but also to plan the maintenance of such buildings in a more vigilant and systematic manner. This will, in future, help to prevent further degradation of heritage buildings, which is very costly, often difficult and sometimes impossible to address if neglected. Savings in time and resources can be achieved, but only if a building's pathological monitoring and inspection results are on hand for use to guide major decisions to be made on how to best prevent further decay, or to save an important historical structure or building fabric.

Findings

The emergence of technological tools will enable the realization of a maintenance-focused conservation model. However, aside from the cost, these tools are still experimental in nature. These technologies are yet to be applied within the conservation industry with hopes of creating an easier and economically effective systematic method of heritage conservation.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the emerging tools and technologies in easing the monitoring aspect of a maintenance-focused conservation model.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Graeme Currie and Carrie Hobart

Addresses the question as to whether opera can be brought to the masses(defined as socio‐economic groups other than A and B). First, itdescribes the methodology used in…

1531

Abstract

Addresses the question as to whether opera can be brought to the masses (defined as socio‐economic groups other than A and B). First, it describes the methodology used in collecting the data. Goes on to describe and analyse the audience profile of opera‐goers, and non‐opera‐goers, in terms of demographic, psychographic, and geographic analysis, and to establish reasons for attendance and non‐attendance among different social groups, based on culture, motivation, and attitude. Finally, makes recommendations in the form of a marketing mix to encourage a wider audience for opera.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Abstract

Details

The Lost Ethnographies: Methodological Insights from Projects that Never Were
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-773-7

Abstract

Details

Stories and Lessons from the World's Leading Opera, Orchestra Librarians, and Music Archivists, Volume 1: North and South America
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-653-8

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Rosemary Polegato and Rune Bjerke

This paper aims to explore the nature and relationships among the dimensions that constitute expectations, anticipation and post-experience assessment of cultural events…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the nature and relationships among the dimensions that constitute expectations, anticipation and post-experience assessment of cultural events, before and after an aesthetic experience, namely, a live Norwegian opera or ballet performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A triangulation approach is used to combine qualitative and quantitative analyses. Quantitative data collection was conducted at the site before and after a performance experience.

Findings

Expectations, anticipation and post-experience assessment are found to be multi-dimensional. Expectations and anticipation are identified as distinct constructs. Three dimensions of expectations of quality are extrinsic cues: building and functional attributes, available services and level of employee service. In addition, two dimensions of pre-experience anticipation are identified: anticipation of information gathering activities and anticipation of the event. Post-experience assessment has two dimensions: satisfaction and pride in the building. Two post-experience associations are enthusiasm and inclusiveness. Anticipation of the event and enthusiasm, not expectations, are found to be predictors of satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

An understanding of the role of anticipation in consumer engagement and satisfaction with aesthetic experiences could be broadened and enriched by studies that include other service or arts disciplines and within a more complex model of consumer engagement.

Originality/value

Anticipation is a significant pre-experience phenomenon. Enthusiasm is identified as a post-experience association.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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