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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Alexander Brem, Petra A. Nylund and Emma L. Hitchen

The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between open innovation and the use of intellectual property rights (IPRs) in small- and medium-sized enterprises…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between open innovation and the use of intellectual property rights (IPRs) in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The authors consider patents, industrial designs (i.e. design patents in the USA), trademarks, and copyrights.

Design/methodology/approach

The relationships between open innovation, IPRs, and profitability are tested with random-effects panel regressions on data from the Spanish Community Innovation Survey for 2,873 firms spanning the years 2008-2013.

Findings

A key result is that SMEs do not benefit from open innovation or from patenting in the same way as larger firms. Furthermore, the results show that SMEs profit in different ways from IPR, depending on their size and the corresponding IPR.

Research limitations/implications

The different impact of IPRs on the efficiency of open innovation in firms of varying sizes highlights the importance of further investigation into IP strategies and into open innovation in SMEs.

Practical implications

Industrial designs are currently the most efficient IPR for SMEs to protect their intellectual property in open innovation collaborations. Depending on the company size, the use of different IPRs is recommended. Moreover, firms should seek to increase the efficiency of open innovation and the use of IPRs.

Social implications

The high impact of SMEs on employment highlights the importance of fomenting efficient innovation processes in such firms.

Originality/value

This paper opens the black box of IPR in relation to open innovation in SMEs, and draws distinctive conclusions with regards to patents, industrial designs, trademarks, and copyrights.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 55 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2018

Bror Salmelin

This chapter describes the transition from single-helix roadmap innovation to Open Innovation 2.0 (OI 2.0), based on Quadruple Helix innovation processes. Innovation is…

Abstract

This chapter describes the transition from single-helix roadmap innovation to Open Innovation 2.0 (OI 2.0), based on Quadruple Helix innovation processes. Innovation is intended to make things happen in new and better ways, but actual take-up is always an essential aspect of successful innovation. A change of mindset to be in accord with the behaviour and processes in innovation ecosystems is crucial for an understanding of the interdependencies and complexity management that lead to impact. OI 2.0 is a ‘mash-up’ parallel process in which the public policy maker needs to create a safe framework for this interaction (mash-up) to take place. OI 2.0 is genuinely intersectional, as innovation increasingly happens at the crossroads of technologies and applications – it is not the linear extrapolation of the past. To speed up scalability, all stakeholders need to co-create solutions and find innovations together in real-world settings. Only then do we have a strong driver to create new markets and services and scale up successes rapidly: There is inherent buy-in in this kind of innovation environment. At the same time, by involving end users as co-creators up front and seamlessly, less successful experiments and failing prototypes are rapidly revealed as such: ‘failing fast, scaling fast’ is one of the strongest advantages of OI 2.0. All this leads to the Quadruple Helix innovation model, which supplements the Triple Helix model (research, industry, public sector) with the additional component of the people. In the Quadruple Helix, citizens are not the passive objects of new products or services but active agents contributing to the whole innovation process.

Details

Exploring the Culture of Open Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-789-0

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2018

Piero Formica and Martin Curley

In the knowledge economy, greater togetherness is the prerequisite for innovating and having more: selflessness extends scope while selfishness increases limitations. But…

Abstract

In the knowledge economy, greater togetherness is the prerequisite for innovating and having more: selflessness extends scope while selfishness increases limitations. But human beings are not automatically attracted to innovation: between the two lies culture and cultural values vary widely, with the egoistic accent or the altruistic intonation setting the scene. In the representations of open innovation we submit to the reader’s attention, selfishness and selflessness are active in the cultural space.

Popularized in the early 2000s, open innovation is a systematic process by which ideas pass among organizations and travel along different exploitation vectors. With the arrival of multiple digital transformative technologies and the rapid evolution of the discipline of innovation, there was a need for a new approach to change, incorporating technological, societal and policy dimensions. Open Innovation 2.0 (OI2) – the result of advances in digital technologies and the cognitive sciences – marks a shift from incremental gains to disruptions that effect a great step forward in economic and social development. OI2 seeks the unexpected and provides support for the rapid scale-up of successes.

‘Nothing is more powerful than an idea whose time has come’ – this thought, attributed to Victor Hugo, tells us how a great deal is at stake with open innovation. Amidon and other scholars have argued that the twenty-first century is not about ‘having more’ but about ‘being more’. The promise of digital technologies and artificial intelligence is that they enable us to extend and amplify human intellect and experience. In the so-called experience economy, users buy ‘experiences’ rather than ‘services’. OI2 is a paradigm about ‘being more’ and seeking innovations that bring us all collectively on a trajectory towards sustainable intelligent living.

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2018

Hsuan-Yu Hsu, Feng-Hsu Liu, Hung-Tai Tsou and Lu-Jui Chen

Technology has been central and has made service innovations technically feasible and economically viable. Top management support, however, plays an important role in…

Abstract

Purpose

Technology has been central and has made service innovations technically feasible and economically viable. Top management support, however, plays an important role in shaping a firm’s service innovation-related strategies and decisions. This study aims to propose a theoretical framework that delineates the relationships among openness of technology adoption, top management support and service innovation within social innovation context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study obtained the data through a survey of 176 information technology (IT) firms in Taiwan; IT managers were selected as the data collection sources. A partial least squares analysis was used to address sophisticated data analysis issues.

Findings

The empirical evidence indicates that openness of technology adoption enhances service innovation within social innovation context. Furthermore, top management support facilitates the relationship between openness of technology adoption and service innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The openness of technology adoption captures the interactions among top management support in shaping service innovation. Researchers should examine the nature of open technology infrastructure that will foster such service innovation from social innovation perspective.

Practical implications

The detailed findings offer practical suggestions for firms that are compelling to invest in advanced open technologies, giving opportunities for service innovation, solving social problems and meeting the new societal challenges. Additionally, firms may foster their top management’s positive intention to support service innovation by pre-planned support activities, such as allocating sufficient new service resources and qualified support technicians.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the evolving literature on the social innovation, service-dominant logic, and contingency theory. This analysis suggests that these perspectives offer a potentially useful view for integrating insights from different literature streams (e.g. openness, social innovation, service innovation, top management support and technology management) by examining them through a different conceptual lens, thus reinforcing existing findings.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Andres Ramirez-Portilla, Enrico Cagno and Terrence E. Brown

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence that adopting open innovation (OI) has on the innovativeness and performance of specialized small and medium-sized…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence that adopting open innovation (OI) has on the innovativeness and performance of specialized small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). This paper also examines the adoption of OI within a firm’s practices and models, and within the three dimensions of firm sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from 48 specialized SMEs manufacturing supercars were analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modeling. SmartPLS software was used to conduct a path analysis and test the proposed framework.

Findings

The findings suggest that high adoption of OI models tends to increase firm innovativeness. Similarly, the adoption of OI practices has a positive effect on innovativeness but to a lesser extent than OI models. The moderation results of innovativeness further show that OI models and practices can benefit the performance of SMEs. Specifically, two dimensions of performance – environmental and social performance – were found to be greatly influenced by OI.

Research limitations/implications

Due to parsimony in the investigated model, this study only focuses on OI adoption as practices and models without considering its drivers or other contingency factors.

Practical implications

This paper could help practitioners in SMEs better understand the benefits of adopting OI to be more innovative but also more sustainable.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on the role of OI practices and models regarding the dimensions of firm sustainability performance by being the first paper to investigate this relationship in the context of small and medium manufacturers of supercars.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2021

Noboru Konno and Carmela Elita Schillaci

This paper reviews the development of knowledge creation theory in the last quarter-century and how it has contributed to innovation management and looks into social and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reviews the development of knowledge creation theory in the last quarter-century and how it has contributed to innovation management and looks into social and human aspects of innovation in the era of “Society 5.0”.

Design/methodology/approach

This research aims to relate basic theoretical concepts: knowledge creation and knowledge assets, purpose, leadership, and place (Ba) for innovation to drive innovation and its management as a whole ecosystem. It also discusses the application to innovation management systems open innovation, and social innovation.

Findings

Today's innovation demands socio-economic fusion that goes beyond current corporate boundaries. By preparing the system (knowledge ecosystem) as the basis, we could build the bridge, and such fusion would be possible.

Research limitations/implications

This paper shows the framework of the idea. Evidence-based research based on “knowledge assessment” will be discussed on another occasion.

Originality/value

This research is to explain knowledge management, innovation, and social innovation beyond the corporate framework.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Ignacio Odriozola-Fernández, Jasmina Berbegal-Mirabent and José M. Merigó-Lindahl

The open innovation (OI) paradigm suggests that firms should use inflows and outflows of knowledge in order to accelerate innovation and leverage markets. Literature…

Abstract

Purpose

The open innovation (OI) paradigm suggests that firms should use inflows and outflows of knowledge in order to accelerate innovation and leverage markets. Literature examining how firms are adopting OI practices is rich; notwithstanding, little research has addressed this topic from the perspective of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Given the relevance of SMEs in worldwide economies, the purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of research on OI in SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 112 academic articles were selected from the Web of Science database. Following a bibliometric analysis, the most relevant authors, journals, institutions and countries are presented. Additionally, the main areas these articles cover are summarized.

Findings

Results are consistent in that the most prolific authors are affiliated with the universities leading the ranking of institutions. However, it is remarkable that top authors in this field do not possess a large number of publications on OI in SMEs, but combine this research topic with other related ones. At the country level, European countries are on the top together with South Korea.

Research limitations/implications

Despite following a rigorous method, other relevant documents not included in the selected databases might have been ignored.

Practical implications

This paper outlines the main topics of interest within this area: impact of OI on firm performance and on organizations’ structure, OI as a mechanism to hasten new product development, the analysis of the inbound/outbound dimensions of OI, and legal issues related to intellectual property right management when OI is implemented.

Originality/value

The study uses a combination of bibliometric indicators with a literature review.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Oscar Tamburis and Isabella Bonacci

The growing success of open innovation practices in many firms raises the question of whether such principles can be transferred for reinventing public sector…

Abstract

Purpose

The growing success of open innovation practices in many firms raises the question of whether such principles can be transferred for reinventing public sector organisations. A paradigm based on principles of integrated collaboration, co-created shared value, cultivated innovation ecosystems, unleashed exponential technologies and extraordinarily rapid adoption is the so-called Open Innovation 2.0. The development of this approach reflects the perception that the innovation process has evolved. This study aims to explore new ways to study healthcare networks as key tool for innovation creation and spreading, by deploying the emergent paradigm of Open Innovation 2.0.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigates the impact of clusters, or localised networks, involving industrial, academic and institutional players, in the (bio)pharmaceutical setting; the aim is to enrich the line of inquiry into cluster-based innovation by applying a social network analysis (SNA) methodology, with the aim to provide new perspectives for recognising how the set of interactions and relationships in the (bio)pharmaceutical context can lead to higher levels of knowledge transfer, organisational learning and innovation spreading.

Findings

Starting from the top ten (bio)pharmaceutical companies, and the top ten contract research organisations (CROs), the study helps understand that: the combination of the single big pharma company and the CROs to which great part of the work is externalised, can be compared to a community of transaction that deals with the supply and demand of a specific kind of goods and services; clusters can comprise either a single one or more communities of transaction; virtual CROs act as a community whose all components participate to the creation of value (co-creation), thus comparable to a certain extent to a community of fantasy.

Originality/value

Based on the novelty of the OI2/SNA combination approach to deal with the “complex” (bio)pharmaceutical industry, the outcomes of the present study mean to highlight: a comprehensive perspective for understanding the dynamics of modularity and their implications for innovation networks; the presence of innovation networks as main mean to promote and support paths of knowledge creation and transfer.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Emma L. Hitchen, Petra A. Nylund, Xavier Ferràs and Sergi Mussons

The exchange of knowledge in social networks is fundamental to innovation. Open, interactive, innovation requires collaboration through social networks. This social…

Abstract

Purpose

The exchange of knowledge in social networks is fundamental to innovation. Open, interactive, innovation requires collaboration through social networks. This social networking is increasingly carried out across the Internet through social media applications. The purpose of this study is to explore the use of social media in open innovation, and explain how this practice is carried out in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). With less resources than large firms, SMEs both have a greater need for open innovation and a less resources to invest in the process.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors study the case of open innovation in start-up Aurea Productiva and induce a framework for open innovation in SMEs powered by social media.

Findings

The authors explore how the main advantages of the Web 2.0 translate into opportunities, challenges and strategies for open innovation that can be directly applied by managers.

Research limitations/implications

The authors contribute to research on open innovation by social media and to research on the innovation process of SMEs. Future quantitative research could confirm and extend the authors’ findings.

Practical implications

Companies that want to fully exploit the benefits of social media can create a strategy that emphasizes coevolution of innovation and resources, sharing their vision and objectives and providing a framework for innovation.

Originality/value

The authors introduce an original analysis of opportunities, challenges and strategies for open innovation in SMEs.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2009

Almeida, Oliveira and Cruz

The adoption of Web 2.0 by companies facilitates the implementation of an open innovation strategy. Web 2.0 applications provide an excellent pool to leverage internal and…

Abstract

The adoption of Web 2.0 by companies facilitates the implementation of an open innovation strategy. Web 2.0 applications provide an excellent pool to leverage internal and external knowledge and ideas which will accelerate technological innovation. This paper looks to the actual impact of Web 2.0 technologies in the business environment and analyzes the motivation drivers to participate in open innovation communities, exploring the increased importance of knowledge networks in the business ecosystem. Additionally, it presents seven guidelines that business leaders should consider to conduct an open innovation 2.0 strategy. Among others, businesses should provide an adequate IT infrastructure, capture tacit knowledge, provide training and coaching sessions and establish an effective evaluation system of their enterprise idea management solution.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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