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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Jukka Piippo and Liam MacGabhann

The purpose of this paper is to stimulate discussion within mental health and psychiatric nursing as to how the open dialogue approach can contribute to their work. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to stimulate discussion within mental health and psychiatric nursing as to how the open dialogue approach can contribute to their work. The paper is mainly theoretical, though relates to practical examples of open dialogue in mental health care research and practice to illustrate the actual potential in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

First the authors raise issue with the narrow lens of psychiatric diagnosis and question its usefulness against a contemporary backdrop of personalised care and recovery orientated practice. Open dialogue as a way of being and as a process are explored as they relate to people interaction and contribute to therapeutic interaction, organisational and community development. The authors reflect on how open dialogue can be and is practiced in different ways and at different levels.

Findings

The authors consider open dialogue as a suitable approach for working with people who have mental health and/or psychiatric problems. The approach is also recommended for working in larger circumstances as families and social network, on organisational and community levels in different ways. Open dialogue should be considered not as a method or technique but as a process of interaction which can be applied to different conditions and circumstances.

Originality/value

Within mental health discourse open dialogue is increasingly evident and filtering into the broader discussion on increasing effectiveness of mental health interventions. Perfectly suited to mental health and psychiatric nursing as a way of being with service user, this reflection on open dialogue offers further thoughts on how as a process it has already filtered into nursing practice and how as nurses we can easily accommodate it within the therapeutic approach.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Anghel N. Rugina

Presents the first chapter in this work with regard to the search for new ideas and better interpretations in the growth and development of new ideas. Investigates the…

Abstract

Presents the first chapter in this work with regard to the search for new ideas and better interpretations in the growth and development of new ideas. Investigates the exchange of views between thinkers of different points of view. Invites co‐operation between various factions to investigate unification of all known sciences (natural and economic) and to include the arts. Mentions all the great thinkers in these areas and unreservedly discusses their contribution in the school of thought. Proffers that modern technology cannot and should not be slowed down and that for the social economy of human solidarity should be aimed for, to begin a new era for humanity.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 27 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2004

Judy Rodgers

The use of dialogues within and across organizations is on the rise. This increase is a tacit acknowledgement of the relational foundations from which new meaning is…

Abstract

The use of dialogues within and across organizations is on the rise. This increase is a tacit acknowledgement of the relational foundations from which new meaning is created and social innovations emerge. However, coming together for a dialogue doesn’t assure constructive conversation or transformative engagement. Dialogue participants, even when they are asked to “suspend assumptions,” are generally still embedded in the mental models and familiar frameworks that distance them from one another and prevent real generativity and novelty.

This paper proposes Appreciative Inquiry as an approach particularly conducive to creating public dialogues that are generative and transformative. It suggests that a community is best served by inquiry into strengths, assets and past successes. It further proposes that this mode of inquiry tends to produce positive emotional states, which expand the resources and pro-social inclinations of those in the dialogue. It offers five conditions that support generative and transformative public dialogue and explains how Appreciative Inquiry creates these conditions.

Details

Constructive Discourse and Human Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-892-7

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Rosemary Skordoulis and Patrick Dawson

The purpose of this paper is to show that too often decisions concerning change are made on the basis of partial understanding, limited data and unreflective assumptions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that too often decisions concerning change are made on the basis of partial understanding, limited data and unreflective assumptions about people and organizations. In the discussion of the Socratic dialogue the aim is to uncover a useful method for ensuring more reflective decision making that involves active participation of employees on the receiving end of change.

Design/methodology/approach

Although dialogue is used in management processes today, it is contended that the Socratic dialogue is particularly useful in making sense of complex change processes. Data drawn from research conducted in two UK higher education institutions are used to illustrate how lack of knowledge and understanding often pervades and constrains change, and how techniques of Socratic dialogue can be used to secure higher levels of employee involvement and commitment to change.

Findings

It is argued that Socratic dialogue can be used as a practical tool to facilitate “participative” change and contend that further research is required to develop the use of this method as a qualitative research instrument for uncovering data on processes of change in organizations.

Originality/value

If practised consistently by organizational members, the Socratic techniques can lead to a more concrete understanding of the complexities of changing organizations. It is a collective process of change through critical questioning and, as such, it lends itself to further exploration on the part of both change managers and qualitative researchers for its uses as a diagnostic and research instrument.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 7 March 2013

Jered Borup, Charles R. Graham and Andrea Velasquez

Caring is an important component of K-12 teaching and learning. An increasing number of K-12 students are enrolling in online courses. The physical separation of students…

Abstract

Caring is an important component of K-12 teaching and learning. An increasing number of K-12 students are enrolling in online courses. The physical separation of students and teachers in the online medium requires a change in the way caring relationships are formed. In this chapter we examine how teachers worked to develop caring relationships with students at the Open High School of Utah, an online charter high school in the United States. Data collection consisted of 22 interviews with 11 instructors. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using constant comparison coding methods. Findings indicate that teachers were able to implement all aspects of Nodding's model of moral education in ways unique to online contexts, and at times with more depth than experienced in a face-to-face context.

Details

Emotion and School: Understanding how the Hidden Curriculum Influences Relationships, Leadership, Teaching, and Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-651-4

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2019

Virginie Amilien, Barbara Tocco and Paal Strandbakken

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and evaluate the role of hybrid forums as tools to address specific controversies related to sustainable practices in localized…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and evaluate the role of hybrid forums as tools to address specific controversies related to sustainable practices in localized agro-food systems (LAFS).

Design/methodology/approach

In contrast with other conventional public engagement methods, such as citizen juries, consensus conferences, focus groups or deliberative processes, hybrid forums entail a more dynamic and democratic mechanism to reflect and act together, with the aim of constructing a common project around a defined challenge (Callon et al., 2001, 2009). They can offer an enriching and challenging methodological approach in the context of LAFS, especially in the discussion of controversial issues around food chain sustainability. The authors present here a new generation of hybrid forums: HF 2.0.

Findings

HF 2.0. represent both a methodological tool and a real experience of dialogic democracy, two interactive aspects which are closely interlinked and rest upon each other. The authors argue that the attractiveness of HF 2.0. is notable in at least two ways: first, they provide a solid democratic and reflective mechanism to stimulate effective dialogue and knowledge-exchange among different stakeholders; second, they contribute as an important methodological evidence-based tool, which can be used as a launching pad for shaping local action groups and community partnerships’ strategies aimed at fostering local development.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to provide a methodological discussion over the experimental use of HF 2.0. in the context of LAFS and assesses their effectiveness in the co-construction of knowledge. The authors explore their pragmatic validity in addressing controversies over local and sustainable seafood via empirical applications in Norway and the UK.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Enrique Bonsón and Francisco Flores

The aim of this paper is to analyse the extent to which global financial institutions are using Web 2.0 technologies and social media initiatives to transform the way in…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to analyse the extent to which global financial institutions are using Web 2.0 technologies and social media initiatives to transform the way in which they perform their corporate disclosure, that is, if these entities are opening a real corporate dialogue.

Design/methodology/approach

The web sites of 132 major global financial entities – in Europe (54 entities), the Asia‐Pacific region (55) and the Americas (23) – have been scored according to a Sophistication Index, considering various relevant Web 2.0 technologies and social media implementations. The analysis, by means of least squares and logistic regression models, is consistent across both techniques.

Findings

Web 2.0 technologies and social media are not fully available in the corporate reporting arena. Nonetheless, a significant influence is detected. The size of each entity and the region in which it operates influence the scored utilisation of Web 2.0 and social media initiatives.

Research limitation/implications

Web 2.0 tools and social media initiatives have been researched via corporate web sites. Corporate visibility in the major social networks, and also the use of advanced web metrics, will remain topics for further research.

Practical implications

A lack of strategy for implementing an effective corporate dialogue is clearly observed. Based on these findings the banking industry and the supervisory authorities, which are under special scrutiny due to the recent global crisis, can take much greater advantage of the potential of social media to open a real corporate dialogue, increasing the level of transparency.

Originality/value

As social media are becoming more useful and ubiquitous, both academics and practitioners need some initial and reliable background data on this preliminary situation. The extraordinary role of protagonist that the banking industry has played in the recent economic upheavals justify its selection as a first sample for this exploratory study.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Laetitia Guibert and Julia Roloff

The purpose of this study is to identify which stakeholder dialogue approach has the best outcomes. Moreover, it is investigated how stakeholder dialogue practices are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify which stakeholder dialogue approach has the best outcomes. Moreover, it is investigated how stakeholder dialogue practices are linked to the quality of stakeholder management and the maturity of corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Twelve CSR managers of 11 French enterprises are interviewed.

Findings

Four different types of stakeholder dialogue are identified and their characteristics, as well as the opportunities and risks connected to each approach, are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

Only a limited number of enterprises operating in France are studied. More research is needed to ensure the generalisability to other countries and to identify the prevalence of each dialogue type.

Practical implications

Proactive companies manage their stakeholders in a mutually beneficial way and receive more stakeholder support on strategic issues. They discuss issues material to stakeholders, include a wide range of stakeholders and organise frequent meetings. This approach, the Hanoï Dialogue, has the best outcomes and is, therefore, best practice.

Social implications

Stakeholder dialogue is key for the development of CSR strategies which truly benefit society.

Originality/value

Although stakeholder dialogues become empirically more relevant, most researchers conduct single-case studies of good practices and do not systematically compare a range of practices.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Ove C. Hansemark and Marie Albinsson

The purpose of this study was to explore how the employees of a company experience the concepts of customer satisfaction and retention. A phenomenological method was used…

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore how the employees of a company experience the concepts of customer satisfaction and retention. A phenomenological method was used, allowing the informants’ own interpretations to be discovered. Satisfaction was discussed from three perspectives: definition of the concept, how to recognise when a customer is satisfied, and how to enhance satisfaction. The informants’ experience pertaining to these three categories varied, and a total of seven ways to define, recognise or enhance satisfaction were discovered. These were: service, feeling, chemistry, relationship and confidence, dialogue, complaints and retention. All except the first two of these categories of experience were found to enhance retention, implying that the informants have found that strategies for enhancing both satisfaction and retention are similar. The strongest connection between retention and satisfaction strategies turned out to be in terms of relationship and confidence.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2017

Rebecca Harvey, Paul Levatino and Julie Liefeld

To utilize LGBTQ affirmative theory to inform clinical work which affords queer youth with disabilities agency and authorship in their negotiations of sexuality.

Abstract

Purpose

To utilize LGBTQ affirmative theory to inform clinical work which affords queer youth with disabilities agency and authorship in their negotiations of sexuality.

Methodology/approach

The authors use a case study to explore the use of queer affirmative theory and peer consultation to guide and evaluate an ongoing clinical case of a young gay man with cerebral palsy as he negotiates his developing sexuality amid powerful messages from media, pornography, friends, and parental influence.

Findings

This paper finds that a queer affirmative therapy model which explores themes of intersectionality, and utilizes nuanced views of sexual identity, sexual behavior, and gender identity are useful to practitioners to encourage agency and authorship for queer disabled people in their negotiations of ability, sexuality, identity, and behavior.

Originality/value

This paper provides an alternative approach to nurturing queer identity by (1) creating refuge for emerging sexualities; (2) allowing for difficult dialogues where ability, sexuality, and gender can be pragmatically discussed, performed, and negotiated; (3) tolerating the discomfort of these difficult dialogues and pushing through to nurturing the unique queerness that evolves out of these conversations; and finally (4) encouraging transformation of all participants including client and practitioners. The practitioners discuss their own transformation through the co-created dialog with each other and with the client.

Details

Gender, Sex, and Sexuality Among Contemporary Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-613-6

Keywords

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