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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Marco Cioppi, Ilaria Curina, Fabio Forlani and Tonino Pencarelli

The purpose of this 22-year paper is to synthetize business and management literature in the context of online presence, online visibility and online reputation concepts…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this 22-year paper is to synthetize business and management literature in the context of online presence, online visibility and online reputation concepts. In particular, this paper aims to generalize the analysis by investigating the level of interest of the Internet, digital and interactive marketing-focused literature, as well as the more general business and management one towards these topics.

Design/methodology/approach

To identify the existence or otherwise of an online presence, visibility and reputation definition, as well as an index for measuring them, a systematic review and a content analysis process were performed on 199 articles categorized over 1997-2018.

Findings

The findings highlight the absence of clear and shared online presence, visibility and reputation definitions; the absence of unanimously accepted indexes for measuring them; and the identification of a sequence relationship between the three investigated constructs.

Research limitations/implications

The paper underlines the need for both theoretical and empirical contributions to reduce the complexity characterizing the business and management literature focused on these topics.

Originality/value

The current study brings out interesting directions for future research studies by systematizing all the articles devoted to the online presence, visibility and reputation concepts from a business and management perspective.

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Case study
Publication date: 26 November 2015

Roma Puri

Marketing, Innovation, Strategy, Digital Marketing and E-Business.

Abstract

Subject area

Marketing, Innovation, Strategy, Digital Marketing and E-Business.

Study level/applicability

Master's level and Executive Program.

Case overview

MocDoc is a young Indian online health-care company that has achieved success in early years of establishment, and is looking forward to expand the customer base. The founder, Senthil Peelikkampatti, along with his friends decided to design a service that can bridge the gap between doctor and patients. However, initially, Senthil lost the trust in his idea due to the unacceptance of the idea by health-care experts. It took a little long for the team to gain visibility after launch of the service. Senthil and the team brainstormed to gain recognition online through different techniques of search engine optimization (SEO) and social media networking through Facebook Web site. MocDoc case is designed to stimulate discussion of a broad array of entrepreneurial issues related to online start-ups. In particular, it deals with strategy and marketing of service in the online arena. At the same time, it gives detailed overview of marketing techniques online as fuel to the business. The company is moving under strong leadership skills of CEO but fails to gain momentum in terms of gaining online customers. This case deals with decision-making capabilities to bring more number of registered customers in the online space.

Expected learning outcomes

The expected learning outcomes are as follows: to animate online business environment and challenges faced by virtual enterprises in the cyber space; to illustrate opportunity for students to speculate the start-up business environment; to illustrate opportunity to introduce cloud computing as a viable business option for the health-care industry; to develop understanding among students for designing effective marketing strategy for online business; to identify business opportunities and gaining competitive edge by offering bouquet of services; and to stimulate business environment for understanding innovation and strategy building.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 5 no. 8
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Fang Wang and Liwen Vaughan

The purpose of this paper is to theoretically analyze and empirically test the business value of firm web visibility, including its relationship to advertising efficiency…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to theoretically analyze and empirically test the business value of firm web visibility, including its relationship to advertising efficiency and long-term financial performance (i.e. shareholder value).

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework is established to analyze firm value of web visibility through its market effects. Hypotheses on the associations between firm web visibility and advertising efficiency and shareholder value are tested by cross-sectional analysis of 1,331 firms in six industries and four industry sectors. The authors control for several firm- and industry-level factors.

Findings

The results consistently support the two hypotheses, i.e., first, a positive and significant relationship between firm web visibility and advertising efficiency; and second, a positive and significant relationship between firm web visibility and shareholder value.

Practical implications

In addition to increasing web traffic, firm web visibility has business value and helps to enhance advertising efficiency and shareholder value. Managers can use the web references as a valuable tool for marketing success when the use of traditional advertising reaches saturation. Managers should actively monitor and use web visibility as a web management measure in practice.

Originality/value

This research provides convincing evidence to support both short-term and long-term business value of web visibility and suggests that web visibility be recognized and managed as a market-based asset.

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2018

Sara Kjellberg and Jutta Haider

The purpose of this paper is to understand what role researchers assign to online representations on the new digital communication sites that have emerged, such as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand what role researchers assign to online representations on the new digital communication sites that have emerged, such as Academia, ResearchGate or Mendeley. How are researchers’ online presentations created, managed, accessed and, more generally, viewed by academic researchers themselves? And how are expectations of the academic reward system navigated and re-shaped in response to the possibilities afforded by social media and other digital tools?

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups have been used for empirical investigation to learn about the role online representation is assigned by the concerned researchers.

Findings

The study shows that traditional scholarly communication documents are what also scaffolds trust and builds reputation in the new setting. In this sense, the new social network sites reinforce rather than challenge the importance of formal publications.

Originality/value

An understanding of the different ways in which researchers fathom the complex connection between reputation and trust in relation to online visibility as a measure of, or at least an attempt at, publicity (either within academia or outside it) is essential. This paper emphasizes the need to tell different stories by exploring how researchers understand their own practices and reasons for them.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Yolanda Fuertes-Callén, Beatriz Cuellar-Fernández and Marcela Pelayo-Velázquez

The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants of online corporate reporting in three Latin American emerging markets, Argentina, Mexico and Chile, providing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants of online corporate reporting in three Latin American emerging markets, Argentina, Mexico and Chile, providing further evidence to test the mediation role of web presence development in the relationship between these determinants and e-disclosure. Web presence development measures the firm's efforts to archive web visibility, web usability and convenience.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a content analysis of corporate web sites, the extent of the information is measured by three internet disclosure indexes. Four constructs which are considered key drivers of a firm's disclosure strategy are identified. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to assess the research model. The sample contains publicly available data on listed companies’ web sites.

Findings

The results reveal that the development of a firm's presence on the internet is as important as its characteristics in determining corporate transparency and in mediating the relationship between firm size and cross-listing and e-disclosure.

Practical implications

Companies should be aware that investors are attaching increasing importance to corporate transparency. Consequently, managers should put more effort into improving web sites, which would increase corporate visibility and open up a direct communication channel with their stakeholders. They should also take advantage of web sites to provide information, above and beyond that required by local law. Not only do current and potential investors find this useful, it also increases their confidence in the company.

Originality/value

This paper proposes an integrative model of the determinants of the level of online corporate reporting using constructs that reflect their multidimensional nature. A non-financial latent variable for web presence on the internet is proposed as a mediator in the relationship between e-disclosure and traditional determinants. The SEM approach simultaneously examines the direct and indirect relationships between the proposed latent variables and how these relationships influence the level of e-disclosure.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Carlos Serrano‐Cinca, Yolanda Fuertes‐Callén and Begoña Gutiérrez‐Nieto

A structural equation model is proposed to explain internet reporting by banks. The model relates three constructs of financial institutions (size, financial performance…

Abstract

Purpose

A structural equation model is proposed to explain internet reporting by banks. The model relates three constructs of financial institutions (size, financial performance, and internet visibility) to their final influence on internet information disclosure (e‐transparency).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper's proposed model analyses a sample of Spanish financial institutions using publicly available data. The model is tested using partial least squares.

Findings

A positive and statistically significant relationship has been found between size, financial performance, internet visibility, and e‐transparency, with direct and indirect effects. The study shows that size accounts for most of the variance. Size has a positive effect on e‐transparency, financial performance, and internet visibility. However, the direct effect of financial performance and internet visibility on e‐transparency is small.

Research limitations/implications

The researchers have analysed only one year of data from one country and one sector. The direction of cause and effect assumed in the model is a logical one, but statistical methods cannot prove causality, only association. Even though any bank can disclose its financial information online for a very low cost, building a robust, interactive web site requires major resources. This gives larger banks a value added advantage.

Originality/value

The paper examines the relationship between size, financial performance, internet visibility and e‐transparency using a structural model. Although structural models are commonly used in many scientific disciplines, they have not yet been applied in disclosure research.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Julie Uldam and Hans Krause Hansen

Corporations are increasingly expected to act responsibly. The purpose of this paper is to examine two types of corporate responses to these expectations: overt and covert…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporations are increasingly expected to act responsibly. The purpose of this paper is to examine two types of corporate responses to these expectations: overt and covert responses. Specifically, it examines oil companies’ involvement in multi-stakeholder initiatives and sponsorships (overt responses) and their monitoring of critics, including non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and activist organisations (covert responses).

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretically, the paper draws on theories of visibility and post-political regulation. Empirically, it focuses on case studies of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI), Shell and BP, drawing on qualitative methods.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that overt responses create an impression of consensus between antagonistic interests and that covert responses support this impression by containing deep-seated conflicts.

Research limitations/implications

Corporate responses have implications for the role of the corporation as a (post-)political actor. By containing antagonism and creating an impression of consensus, the interplay between overt and covert responses open up further possibilities for the proliferation of soft governance and self-regulation through participation in voluntary transparency and corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities. Data on covert practices of corporations are difficult to access. This impedes possibilities for fully assessing their extent. The findings of this paper support trends emerging from recent research on covert corporate intelligence practices, but more research is needed to provide a systematic overview.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the understudied area of covert corporate activity in research on the political role of multinational corporations.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Zahid Ashraf Wani and Adil Ahmad Sofi

This paper aims to gauge the visibility of open content available in different formats of select open courseware (OCW) repositories through prominent search engines.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to gauge the visibility of open content available in different formats of select open courseware (OCW) repositories through prominent search engines.

Design/methodology/approach

Open content in three formats (pdf, audio and video) from four OCW repositories listed in the OCW consortium under the science and technology subject heading were searched through seven select search engines.

Findings

None of the selected OCW repositories are fully visible on the selected search engines. Visibility of OCW content varied from one search engine to the other and was affected by the format in which it is available. Google is the best search engine for retrieving OCW content, whereas OCWfinder – a specialized search engine for retrieving OCW – has performed dismally.

Research limitations/implications

The study demonstrates the need for enhancing the visibility of open content through using search engine optimization techniques.

Originality/value

The study intends to supply findings that could be used by stakeholders to improve the visibility of OCW repositories. It is an attempt to draw a comparison between search engines for their ability to index different formats of OCW in the selected repositories. Findings can be used by information professionals to brush their information hunting skills.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2021

Paul Capriotti, Ileana Zeler and Mark Anthony Camilleri

Web 2.0 and the social networks have changed how organizations interact with their publics. They enable organizations to engage in symmetric dialogic communications with…

Abstract

Web 2.0 and the social networks have changed how organizations interact with their publics. They enable organizations to engage in symmetric dialogic communications with individuals. Various organizations are increasingly ­using different social media to enhance their visibility and relationships with their publics. They allow them to disseminate information, to participate, listen and actively engage in online conversations with different stakeholders. Some social networks have become a key instrument for corporate communication. Therefore, this chapter presents a critical review on the organizations’ dialogic communications with the publics via social networks. It puts forward a conceptual framework that comprises five key dimensions including ­“active presence,” “interactive attitude,” “interactive resources,” “responsiveness” and “conversation.” This contribution examines each dimension and explains their effect on the organizations’ dialogic communication with the publics. Hence, this contribution has resulted in important implications for corporate communication practitioners as well as for academia. Moreover, it opens future research avenues to academia.

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Book part
Publication date: 3 November 2014

Daniel Trottier

Social media platforms, along with networked devices and applications, enable their user base to produce, access and circulate large volumes of data. On the one hand, this…

Abstract

Purpose

Social media platforms, along with networked devices and applications, enable their user base to produce, access and circulate large volumes of data. On the one hand, this development contains an empowering potential for users, who can make otherwise obscured aspects of social life visible, and coordinate social action in accordance. Yet the preceding activities in turn render these users visible to governments as well as the multinational companies that operate these services. Between these two visions lie more nuanced accounts of individuals coordinating via social data for reactionary purposes, as well as policing and intelligence agencies struggling with the affordances of big data.

Design/methodology/approach

This chapter considers how individual users as well as police agencies respectively actualise the supposedly revolutionary and repressive potentials associated with big data. It briefly considers the broader social context in which ‘big data’ is situated, which includes the hardware, software, individuals and cultural values that render big data meaningful and useful. Then, in contrast to polarising visions of the social impact of big data, it considers two sets of practices that speak to a more ambivalent potentiality. First, recent examples suggest a kind of crowd-sourced vigilantism, where individuals rely on ubiquitous data and devices in order to reproduce law and order politics. Second, police agencies in various branches of European governments report a sense of obligation to turn to social data as a source of intelligence and evidence, yet attempts to do so are complicated by both practical and procedural challenges. A combination of case studies and in-depth interviews offers a grounded understanding of big data in practice, in contrast to commonly held visions of these technologies.

Findings

First, big data is only ever meaningful in use. While they may be contained in databases in remote locations, big data do not exist in a social vacuum. Their impact cannot be fully understood in the context of newly assembled configurations or ‘game-changing’ discourses. Instead, they are only knowable in the context of existing practices. These practices can initially be the sole remit of public discourse shaped by journalists, tech-evangelists and even academics. Yet embodied individual and institutional practices also emerge, and this may contradict or at least complicate discursive assertions. Secondly, the range of devices and practices that make up big data are engaged in a bilateral relation with these practices. They may be a platform to further reproduce relations of information exchange and power relations. Yet they may also reconfigure these relations.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to a sample of respondents based in the European Union, and based at a particular stage of big data and social media monitoring uptake. Subsequent research should look at how this uptake is occurring elsewhere, along with the medium to long-term implications of big data monitoring. Finally, subsequent research should consider how citizens and other social actors are coping with these emerging practices.

Originality/value

This chapter considers practices associated with big data monitoring and draws from cross-national empirical data. It stands in contrast to overly optimistic as well as well as totalising accounts of the social costs and consequences of big data. For these reasons, this chapter will be of value to scholars in internet studies, as well as privacy advocates and policymakers who are responsive to big data developments.

Details

Big Data? Qualitative Approaches to Digital Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-050-6

Keywords

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