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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Daniel B. Le Roux and Douglas A. Parry

Online vigilance is a novel construct which describes individual differences in users' cognitive orientation to online connectedness, their attention to and integration of…

Abstract

Purpose

Online vigilance is a novel construct which describes individual differences in users' cognitive orientation to online connectedness, their attention to and integration of online-related cues and stimuli and their prioritisation of online communication. Its proponents argue that it is acquired through the processes of instrumental and attentional training that underlie media use behaviours. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the role of three personal characteristics (emotional intelligence, rumination and identity distress) as predictors of online vigilance in addition to media use behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted an exploratory frame and followed a survey-methodology to collect data among a sample of university students (n = 812). The resulting data were analysed through a hierarchical multiple regression process in which four models were considered.

Findings

The findings indicate that while media use behaviours (daily smartphone use, social media use, messaging, video watching and media multitasking) predict online vigilance, their combined effect is weak. However, when considering these behaviours in combination with trait rumination and identity distress, a moderate effect is observable.

Research limitations/implications

While the findings do not permit causal inference, it suggests that two personal characteristics, trait rumination and identity distress, play an important role in determining an individual's tendency or ability to psychologically disconnect from their online spheres. This provides an initial step towards the theorisation of online vigilance and the identification of individuals who may be at risk of acquiring it.

Originality/value

Online vigilance is a novel construct which has only been investigated in a small number of studies. However, its emphasis on psychological connectedness presents a unique and important development in the context of permanently online, permanently connected living. The present study is the first to explore its association with personal characteristics.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Debra Bateman and Julie Willems

A social and cultural expectation that Information Communication Technologies (ICT) should be ubiquitous within peoples' daily lives is apparent. Connecting generational…

Abstract

A social and cultural expectation that Information Communication Technologies (ICT) should be ubiquitous within peoples' daily lives is apparent. Connecting generational groups with a specific set of technological attributes also assumes the ways that particular groups of students should be able/do “naturally” use emergent mobile and social technologies. Moreover, the use of social networking technologies is evident in a number of ways within higher education (HE) pedagogies. As part of the suite of possibilities in Web 2.0, Facebook is used in a number of ways to support communications within and between institutions and their students as well as a mechanism for teaching and learning within specific units of study.

The chapter commences with a broad discussion about social sharing software of Web 2.0, specifically Facebook, as a potential teaching and learning tool in HE contexts. We traverse recent exemplars and discourses surrounding the use of social technologies for the purposes of HE. It is clear from the literature that while there is much excitement at the possibilities that such technologies offer, there are increasing anxieties across institutional and individual practitioners, in regard to possible consequences of their use.

Through autoethnographic methodology, this chapter showcases potentials and challenges of Facebook in HE. Through the use of constructed scenarios, the authors describe occurrences that necessitate increasing professional development and vigilance online. Some of the issues highlighted within this chapter include blurring of professional and personal life world boundaries, issues of identity theft and vandalism, cyberstalking and bullying, working in the public domain, and questions of virtual integrity.

Details

Misbehavior Online in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-456-6

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Jacqueline Harding

This paper aims to investigate how, where and when parents are mediating their children’s media activities and with which particular device. It also explores whether…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how, where and when parents are mediating their children’s media activities and with which particular device. It also explores whether parents are identifying specific help in this area and questions where they might seek advice (should they need it). Furthermore, it investigates parents’ views regarding a pilot, free online TV channel dedicated to advice through discussion with experts, parents and children.

Design/methodology/approach

This small-scale study uses charts and semi-structured interviews to explore the views of parents/carers to better understand lived experiences in relation to mediated digital parenting in the home. The methodology was also designed so that findings will inform further production of relevant content for a video-based resource.

Findings

Although this study was limited in duration and scope, the results clearly support earlier research (Livingstone, 2018a, 2018b; Ofcom, 2017) regarding the desperation parents feel through not being able to access appropriate advice in the way they want it. Furthermore, findings provide overwhelming support for the potential benefits of relevant predominantly visually-based online content/advice.

Practical implications

The study raises questions about the empowerment of parents/carers in their own digital skills as a way of transferring confidence to their children, in navigating their way through the educational and social affordances and online safety issues through the use of accessible filmed content.

Originality/value

The findings show that issues, such as online safety and related behavioural pressures, remain key for parents and that there is an increasing need for more targeted support and ways to empower parents/grandparents with skills to enhance children’s digital agency. Furthermore, it offers an insight into ways in which styles of “enabling mediation” in the digital age may be analysed and reveals some of the day to day challenges parents face.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Efthymios Constantinides

Addresses one of the fundamental issues of e‐marketing: how to attract and win over the consumer in the highly competitive Internet marketplace. Analyses the factors…

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Abstract

Addresses one of the fundamental issues of e‐marketing: how to attract and win over the consumer in the highly competitive Internet marketplace. Analyses the factors affecting the online consumer's behavior and examines how e‐marketers can influence the outcome of the virtual interaction and buying process by focusing their marketing efforts on elements shaping the customer's virtual experience, the Web experience. Identifying the Web experience components and understanding their role as inputs in the online customer's decision‐making process are the first step in developing and delivering an attractive online presence likely to have the maximum impact on Internet users. Click‐and‐mortar firms delivering superior Web experience influence their physical clients’ perceptions and attitudes, driving additional traffic to traditional sales outlets. Provides a contribution to the theoretical debate around the factors influencing the online consumer's behavior and outlines some noticeable similarities and differences between the traditional and virtual consumers.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Book part
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Laura A. Wankel and Charles Wankel

Universities are increasing hubs of digital activity; much commendable, some reprehensible. It is dismaying that in some learners' minds the divide between them is murky…

Abstract

Universities are increasing hubs of digital activity; much commendable, some reprehensible. It is dismaying that in some learners' minds the divide between them is murky rather than clear. Today's students are largely digital natives born into computing and its venues. In many colleges, during orientation the preponderance of incoming students use their new college e-mail accounts to enable in Facebook, etc., easy online communication with others in the institution. Unlike past decades when a student might be handed flyers or read postings on poles and walls, today's students are in a maelstrom of social media, and other new technologies that students are socially pressed to use. In her book Ruling the Waves, Debora Spar suggested that cyberspace is like a frontier town, a place where there are “not a lot of rules or marshals in town” (Spar, 2001). People online often feel relatively unconstrained, creative, and innovative. At the same time, chaos, disorder, nefariousness, and just plain “bad behavior” are rife. New technologies foster the sense of a new normality. Yet just because it is now possible to act in new ways through new technologies does not make those ways acceptable.

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Misbehavior Online in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-456-6

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Krishna K. Tummala

One cannot mandate honesty.– Veerappa Moily, Chair,Second Administrative Reforms Commission, 2007India did not invent corruption, but it seems to excel in it. Transparency…

Abstract

One cannot mandate honesty.– Veerappa Moily, Chair,Second Administrative Reforms Commission, 2007India did not invent corruption, but it seems to excel in it. Transparency International, (TI) in its September 2007 Corruption Perception Index, placed India 72nd (tying with China and Brazil) with its neighbors Sri Lanka at 94th, Pakistan 138th, and Bangladesh 162nd as among the most corrupt of the 180 nations it surveyed. Denmark, Finland, and New Zealand stood at the top as the least corrupt, while Mynamar and Somalia are ranked at the bottom as the most corrupt. In 2008, India was ranked at 74th (Transparency International, 2007, 2008). In its 2005 study, TI found that as many as 62% of Indians believe corruption is real and in fact had first hand experience of paying bribes (Transparency International, 2005). Three-fourths in the survey also believe that the level of corruption in public services has only increased during 2004–2005. It is estimated that a total of about $5 billion are paid annually as bribes. The police are ranked as the most corrupt, followed by lower judiciary and Land Administration. Yet Suresh Pachauri, the Minister of State for Parliamentary Affairs, Government of India, declared: “Government is fully committed to implement its policy of zero tolerance against corruption. It is moving progressively to eradicate corruption by improving transparency and accountability” (Pachauri, 2008). This is a rather sorry state for a country known as the largest working democracy.

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The Many Faces of Public Management Reform in the Asia-Pacific Region
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-640-3

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2021

Oludayo Tade

This paper aims to examine the nature of frauds and insider involvement in the perpetration of frauds in Nigeria’s banking ecosystem. It probes the payment platforms…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the nature of frauds and insider involvement in the perpetration of frauds in Nigeria’s banking ecosystem. It probes the payment platforms mostly vulnerable to fraud attacks since the role-out of cashless policy in Nigeria in 2014.

Design/methodology/approach

Using secondary data on frauds and forgeries in Nigeria Deposit Insurance Corporation annual report of 2019, the study engaged the data on frauds and forgeries to unpack the complex dynamics in relation to bank frauds in Nigeria.

Findings

Findings show that fraud attacks on deposit money banks increased year in year out although the actual monetary loss dropped in 2019 as against 2018. Technology mediated transactions such as the use of automated teller machine and internet-based transactions experienced the most fraud. In relation to the role of insiders, all cadres of staff were involved in the fraud but majority of those involved were temporary staff.

Practical implications

Arising from this, it is suggested that banks should continue to strengthen security system and governance structures. Employing temporary staff should be phased out while online and offline vigilance should be mounted.

Originality/value

The study contributes to knowledge by examining the nature of frauds and unveiling the insider dimensions of fraud and the possible factors increasing the vulnerability of casual staff to perpetrate fraud.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2017

Rose Marie Santini, Danilo Silva, Túlio Brasil, Rafael Rezende, Camyla Terra, Heloísa Traiano, Kenzo Seto, Marcela De Orlandis and Clara Rescala

This chapter examines possible relationships between use of social media in online mobilization and mainstream print media coverage during the June 2013 protests in…

Abstract

This chapter examines possible relationships between use of social media in online mobilization and mainstream print media coverage during the June 2013 protests in Brazil, a series of demonstrations which happened throughout the country initially around bus ticket prices.

In order to develop the research, we compared news from leading Brazilian newspapers (O Globo, Folha de S. Paulo, Estadão, and O Dia) with the activities of most influential Twitter users in the dissemination of messages about these events in the country during the period from June 01 to 30, 2013. The results show trends in the emerging dynamics of social organization that may indicate the role of old and new media in today’s Brazilian politics.

The research analyzed the extent to which the events occurring on the streets shaped and/or reflected user-generated social media content.

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2020

Md. Nurul Momen, Harsha S. and Debobrata Das

This paper aims to highlight the very recent cases of internet shutdown during the creation of Union territory of Jammu and Kashmir and enactment of Citizenship Amendment…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the very recent cases of internet shutdown during the creation of Union territory of Jammu and Kashmir and enactment of Citizenship Amendment Act and the detention under Section 66 (A) of Information Technology Act 2000.

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes up a broad explorative discussion of the challenges posed to the consolidation of democracy in India due to frequent internet shutdowns for online communication and social media usages.

Findings

As findings, it is narrated that due to politically motivated reasons, India compromises its commitment to the pluralism and diversity in views, in particular, individual rights to freedom of expression and opinion, enshrined in the constitution.

Originality/value

Right to freedom of speech and expression has now taken a new shape due to the emergence and availability of the internet that enriches the quality of democracy.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Yang Cheng and Zifei Fay Chen

This study focused on the impact of misinformation on social networking sites. Through theorizing and integrating literature from interdisciplinary fields such as…

Abstract

Purpose

This study focused on the impact of misinformation on social networking sites. Through theorizing and integrating literature from interdisciplinary fields such as information behavior, communication and relationship management, this study explored how misinformation on Facebook influences users' trust, distrust and intensity of Facebook use.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed quantitative survey research and collected panel data via an online professional survey platform. A total of 661 participants in the USA completed this study, and structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the theoretical model using Amos 20.

Findings

Based on data from an online questionnaire (N = 661) in the USA, results showed that information trustworthiness and elaboration, users' self-efficacy of detecting misinformation and prescriptive expectancy of the social media platform significantly predicted both trust and distrust toward Facebook, which in turn jointly influenced users' intensity of using this information system.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing body of literature on information and relationship management and digital communication from several important aspects. First, this study disclosed the underlying cognitive psychological and social processing of online misinformation and addressed the strategies for future system design and behavioral intervention of misinformation. Second, this study systematically examined both trust and distrust as cognitive and affective dimensions of the human mindsets, encompassed the different components of the online information behavior and enriched one’s understanding of how misinformation affected publics' perceptions of the information system where it appeared. Last but not least, this study advanced the relationship management literature and demonstrated that a trustful attitude exerted a stronger influence on the intensity of Facebook use than distrust did.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/OIR-04-2020-0130

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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