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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Jayden Holmes, Oli Rafael Moraes, Lauren Rickards, Wendy Steele, Mette Hotker and Anthony Richardson

The purpose of this paper is to explore emerging synergies and tensions between the twin moves to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs) and online

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore emerging synergies and tensions between the twin moves to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs) and online learning and teaching (L&T) in higher education institutions (HEIs).

Design/methodology/approach

A preliminary global exploration of universities’ SDG-based L&T initiatives was undertaken, using publicly available grey and academic literature. Across a total sample of 179 HEIs – identified through global university rankings and analysis of all 42 Australian universities – 150 SDG-based L&T initiatives were identified. These were analysed to identify common approaches to embedding the SDGs.

Findings

Five key approaches to embedding the SDGs into online (and offline) HEI L&T were identified: designing curricula and pedagogy to address the SDGs; orienting the student experience towards the SDGs; aligning graduate outcomes with the SDGs; institutional leadership and capability building; and participating in cross-institutional networks and initiatives. Four preliminary conclusions were drawn from subsequent analysis of these themes and their relevance to online education. Firstly, approaches to SDG L&T varied in degree of alignment between theory and practice. Secondly, many initiatives observed already involve some component of online L&T. Thirdly, questions of equity need to be carefully built into the design of online SDG education. And fourthly, more work needs to be done to ensure that both online and offline L&T are delivering the transformational changes required for and by the SDGs.

Research limitations/implications

The research was limited by the availability of information on university websites accessible through a desk-top review in 2019; limited HEI representation; and the scope of the 2019 THE Impact Rankings.

Originality/value

To date, there are no other published reviews, of this scale, of SDG L&T initiatives in universities nor analysis of the intersection between these initiatives and the move to online L&T.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Charles Krusekopf

Two of the most important trends in higher education have been the emergence of online learning and efforts to internationalise the curriculum and student body. While most…

Abstract

Two of the most important trends in higher education have been the emergence of online learning and efforts to internationalise the curriculum and student body. While most universities embraced both these trends, insufficient attention has been paid to how the two approaches might be mutually supportive. Online education offers the opportunity to bring together students living in different countries in common courses and programmes, but cross-border enrolments remain low and new models and approaches are needed to build educational offerings that bring students and faculty from different countries together in sustained educational engagement online. This paper highlights a case study of an innovative blended double degree business masters’ program between Royal Roads University (RRU) in Canada and the Management Center Innsbruck (MCI) in Austria that allows mid-career, blended learning students to build international competencies and networks while continuing to work full-time. Through this double degree program, students can complete a Master of Global Management (MGM) at RRU and an MBA at MCI in approximately 24 months. Mid-career students have traditionally had limited opportunities to participate in an international education due to work and family constraints, but the pairing of two blended programmes creates an opportunity for these students to engage in a rich cross-cultural learning community. The paper highlights the challenges of integrating online learning into internationalisation strategies and explains how double degree programmes such as the RRU-MCI collaboration provide advantages that help overcome the challenges associated with online programmes that enrol students from different countries.

Details

The Disruptive Power of Online Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-326-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Greg Eisenbarth

The online degree and education market represents a crossroad for Higher Education. Outlines some issues the HE community must now face and several factors to success for…

Abstract

The online degree and education market represents a crossroad for Higher Education. Outlines some issues the HE community must now face and several factors to success for their online degree programs. Universities have played an important role in the formation of the Internet and application of online education. The question remains, will universities actively participate and lead this market or sit on the sidelines and watch an opportunity for education slip away? Universities must act now.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2019

Marie-Line Germain

Abstract

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Integrating Service-Learning and Consulting in Distance Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-412-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Yunus Kathawala, Khaled Abdou and Dean S. Elmuti

There is increased interest in online MBA programs across the globe. This paper attempts to review and assess online MBA programs and what lessons other universities and…

Abstract

There is increased interest in online MBA programs across the globe. This paper attempts to review and assess online MBA programs and what lessons other universities and students can learn from them. It attempts to compare between the online and the traditional MBA. In addition, a thorough evaluation of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of the online MBA is made. The evaluation considers point of views from universities, professors, and students that combined together will assess the future and growth of “global MBAs”.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Phoebe Wong, Daisy Lee and Peggy M.L. Ng

A fuller understanding of the information search behaviour of prospective students in the digital era is one of the keys to success in university recruitment. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

A fuller understanding of the information search behaviour of prospective students in the digital era is one of the keys to success in university recruitment. The purpose of this paper is to investigate students’ university choice factors in relation to the online environment.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 637 samples from 11 private higher education institutions were collected and tested against assumptions before performing statistical analysis including exploratory factor analysis and mean comparison.

Findings

The findings revealed that there are some significant differences in gender and academic discipline in the use of the internet to search for university information. In addition, four constructs of university information were identified that are perceived as important by students in their search behaviour: “university reputation”, “eligibility and affordability”, “teaching and learning” and “university tangibility”. The outcomes of this research provide some noteworthy insights which have numerous strategic digital marketing implications.

Originality/value

While most existing studies have explored types of social media apps or online channels that prospective students use, little research has touched on students’ university choice factors in relation to the online environment. Responding to Constantinides and Zinck Stagno (2011) and Hemsley-Brown et al.’s (2016) call, this paper aims to address this research gap by investigating students’ university information search in relation to the online environment.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Aleksandra Webb, Ronald William McQuaid and C. William R. Webster

This article investigates some ongoing issues faced by higher education institutions (HEIs) having to rapidly move their teaching online during the early stages of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This article investigates some ongoing issues faced by higher education institutions (HEIs) having to rapidly move their teaching online during the early stages of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The article incorporates a review of academic and policy literature concerning digitalisation and online learning in universities and qualitative interviews with staff involved in online teaching and learning at a university in Scotland.

Findings

For most HEIs and organisations across the globe, the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the speed at which digitalisation and digital ways of working have been embedded in organisational life and service delivery including new ways of learning and working. This has led to a recognition of the need for practically focused, effective inclusive digital interventions. A range of initiatives that have been developed or accelerated in response to the pandemic are discussed. These should be explicitly designed and implemented to also reach individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds, including those with low-skill levels or qualifications and older age groups. Effort is also needed by policymakers and HEIs to better understand the challenges and unintended consequences that digital learning and working poses.

Research limitations/implications

More research is needed into the methods and implications of increased online teaching. The range of interviewees is limited to one main organisation. A wider range of staff, students, HEIs and other types of organisation would add additional insights.

Practical implications

Insights from interviews highlight a number of institutional responses to digitalisation, which were accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic. These identify learning and reflection points for HEIs moving to enhanced online teaching provision.

Originality/value

This article provides an analysis of the processes, issues and impacts associated with the rapid shift to digitisation in HEIs at a point in time shortly following the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. It raises issues around inclusivity of online learning, pedagogy, unintended consequences of digitalisation and privacy, when moving to online teaching that are relevant both during the pandemic and in the longer term.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles and Robert Detmering

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces and annotates periodical articles, monographs, and audiovisual material examining library instruction and information literacy.

Findings

The paper provides information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship, and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Valentina Ndou, Giustina Secundo, John Dumay and Elvin Gjevori

Intellectual capital disclosure (ICD) in universities is gaining increasing attention, especially through the adoption of innovative technologies. Online media, as a…

Abstract

Purpose

Intellectual capital disclosure (ICD) in universities is gaining increasing attention, especially through the adoption of innovative technologies. Online media, as a relevant source of Big Data, is shifting ICD. The purpose of this paper is to explore how Big Data generated through online media, such as websites and platforms like Facebook, can be used as rich sources of data and viable disclosure channels for ICD in a university.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an exploratory case study, following the methodology in Yin (2014), that examines how online media data contributes to closing the ICD gap. The IC disclosed through different online media channels by a private university in Albania is analysed using Secundo et al.’s (2016) collective intelligence framework. The online data sources include the university’s website, Facebook page, periodic reports and statements outlining future goals.

Findings

What the authors discover in this research is that IC is an important part of how universities operate, and IC is communicated through social media, although unintentionally. However, this only serves to highlight the importance of IC, and if researchers want to discover IC and understand how it works in an organisation, they need to include social media and a prime resource for developing that understanding.

Research limitations/implications

Most importantly, the findings add to a growing consensus that ICD researchers, and researchers in other management and accounting disciplines, who traditionally rely on annual corporate social responsibility and other periodic reports, they need to change their medium of analysis because these reports no longer can be relied on to understand IC and its impact on an organisation.

Originality/value

Online media tools and the advent of Big Data have created new opportunities for universities to disclose their IC information to stakeholders in a timely manner and to gain relevant insights into their impact on the society. The originality of the paper resides in the contribution of Big Data to the ICD research stream.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2021

Majda I. Ayoub/Al-Salim and Khaled Aladwan

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between academic integrity of online university students and its effects on academic performance and learning quality. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between academic integrity of online university students and its effects on academic performance and learning quality. The first hypothesis aimed to see if there is statistically significant relationship between academic honesty of students taking online classes and their apparent academic performance. The second hypothesis aimed to see if there is a statistically significant difference in academic integrity among male and female students. The third hypothesis aimed to see if there was a statistically significant relationship between academic honesty of students and their quality of learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a quantitative study; data was collected via student emails from 155 active online university students.

Findings

There was a positive linear relationship for the first hypothesis, the relationship is relatively weak as the value of Pearson correlation was (0.172). For the second hypothesis, the results showed that there was no significant difference between males and females. The results for the third hypothesis showed that there is a statistically significant relationship between academic integrity of students taking online classes and academic learning quality. This relationship is relatively strong.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size may have been a limitation for generalizing the results.

Practical implications

As a practical implication, authors recommend that education administrators focus on training their faculty members to stress and instill strong ethical values, such as academic integrity and honesty, in their students all throughout their academic journey.

Social implications

As for social implication, the embracing of ethical values in students, graduates may continue to embrace such values in the workplace which may lead to more reputable and profitable work environment where the society at large benefits.

Originality/value

This research is among the pioneers that attempted to study the connection of academic integrity and learning quality from the students’ perspective.

Details

Journal of Ethics in Entrepreneurship and Technology, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2633-7436

Keywords

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