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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2021

M. Mahruf C. Shohel, Md. Ashrafuzzaman, Atm Shafiul Alam, Arif Mahmud, Muhammad Shajjad Ahsan and Md Tariqul Islam

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on higher education (HE) across the globe, including in Bangladesh. The Bangladeshi HE system is going through an abrupt…

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on higher education (HE) across the globe, including in Bangladesh. The Bangladeshi HE system is going through an abrupt transition and transformation to cope with the crisis. This chapter is based on data collected from teachers and students of Bangladeshi public and private HE institutions regarding teaching and learning during the COVID-19 lockdown. In Bangladesh, some universities switched to online distance teaching and learning quickly during this period, and others lagged behind in this regard. Teachers and students from both groups of public and private universities participated in the study, including those who attended online teaching and learning activities and those who did not participate. This chapter highlights both teachers’ and students’ perspectives regarding students’ future preparedness for participating fully in the changing landscape of HE, especially technology-enhanced teaching and learning. Understanding these perspectives of teachers and students is important to address the digital divide and social justice issues in the policy and practice. Within the HE sector in Bangladesh, it is especially vital while transforming its education system and adapting emerging technologies to address the challenges of education in future emergencies.

Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2021

Stanislaus Agava, Sahaya G. Selvam and Judith Pete

Globally, the COVID-19 pandemic took institutions of learning and the workplaces by surprise. Offering online learning was an alternative for institutions of higher…

Abstract

Globally, the COVID-19 pandemic took institutions of learning and the workplaces by surprise. Offering online learning was an alternative for institutions of higher learning. Were the Kenyan institutions adequately prepared for this? The present study had three specific objectives: (a) to establish the status of policy preparedness of online teaching and learning in Kenyan universities; (b) to explore the infrastructural preparedness of the universities; and (c) to find out the level of competency preparedness of lecturers and students in embracing the facilities for online teaching and learning. The study had an embedded mixed method research design. Data were gathered using an online questionnaire, from 112 lecturers and 372 students, who were conveniently sampled, representing 34 universities and university colleges. Findings suggest that almost all represented institutions have a policy on online teaching and learning, though 50% of participants’ report that the policy did not exist prior to the onset of COVID-19. On the level of infrastructural preparedness, the personal ownership of digital devices among participants is very impressive, though 50% of institutions do not provide any device. Thirdly, the level of competency in the use of the three sets of online platforms for teaching and learning is far below the expected average, but this is improving since the onset of COVID-19. Lecturers have statistically more perceived competence than students (p<0.01). The implication of these results is discussed. And we conclude that the period of forced online teaching and learning need not be considered as a stop-gap measure during COVID-19, but as a way forward for improved self-learning and lifelong learning.

Details

New Student Literacies amid COVID-19: International Case Studies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-466-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2021

Chinaza Solomon Ironsi

This study intends to examine these misconceptions in a bid to reaching a valid conclusion. More importantly, this study intends to elicit information from instructors and

Abstract

Purpose

This study intends to examine these misconceptions in a bid to reaching a valid conclusion. More importantly, this study intends to elicit information from instructors and preservice teachers on their experiences, successes and challenges on the sudden switch from flipped classroom to emergency remote online teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative research design and the main focus of this research design which was is a form of exploratory research design was to understand the reasons opinions and viewpoints of a particular group of people concerning a situation. This paper deems this research design fit for eliciting relevant information from instructors and preservice teachers on their opinions and perceptions on the sudden shift from flipped classrooms to emergency remote online teaching during the previous semester. Data collection for this study was carried out through the use of focus group discussions where participants were asked questions based on the objective of the study.

Findings

The present findings confirm that the mode of instruction delivery was not online teaching rather emergency remote online teaching. Another conclusion that was drawn was with regards to training, use of resources and issues of measurement and evaluation. The study summarized that there was little or no training for the teaching staff before the switch to EROT as instructors were only given guidelines on what to do to implement their lesson plans.

Originality/value

Emergency remote online teaching is a newly emerging approach to lesson delivery, especially in an emergency situation. This study elaborates more on this new dimension of teaching and future prospects as well.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Ida Fatimawati Adi Badiozaman, Hugh John Leong and Wallace Wong

As an institution that has invested in e-learning infrastructure and technology for e-learning delivery, Swinburne University of Technology Sarawak conducted The Digital…

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Abstract

Purpose

As an institution that has invested in e-learning infrastructure and technology for e-learning delivery, Swinburne University of Technology Sarawak conducted The Digital Educator Series as a means of embracing this educational disruption. In particular, this paper reports on the first three courses held under the Digital Educator Series that aims to equip teachers with practical and effective online teaching to school teachers in Sarawak. While the training is still in effect, preliminary results are shared, and implications for practice and recommendations for further research are considered.

Design/methodology/approach

Approximately 136 questionnaires containing close-and open-ended items were distributed to the teacher participants of the Digital Educator Series. Close-ended items were designed to gather general information about their perceptions of online teaching and learning. Items were constructed to gather insights on familiarity with online teaching and learning, perceived usefulness of platforms such as Microsoft Teams and Google Classrooms. The open-ended items were designed to gather information on areas of improvement for the courses and professional development needs of teachers for online teaching.

Findings

The findings revealed very mixed responses in terms of teachers' familiarity with online teaching and learning. Nonetheless, it was encouraging that the majority of teachers felt positively about the impact and usefulness of the courses in the Digital Educator Series and have expressed that would like to learn more about online teaching pedagogy. Teachers reported the greatest familiarity with Google Classroom and were very positive about the applicability the Google Classroom Course (91.2%) in their own teaching practice. Conversely, all of the participants reported they were unfamiliar with Microsoft Teams. Accordingly, the teachers did not perceive its applicability to be as high as the Google Classroom. The qualitative findings further corroborated this and expressed the need for specific professional development programmes that include pedagogical and technological support. Overall, the teachers are strongly focussed in their professional development in order to improve their online teaching,

Research limitations/implications

Like other research, this too has its limitations. The sample size in this study was restricted to those who attended the Digital Educator Series training. Hence the results of this study, whilst have been enriching, and to a certain extent are supported by the current literature, the accuracy of the description may be unique to this particular group of individuals, within this particular setting. Additionally, the study only relied on self-reports from both the questionnaire and the semi-structured interviews. This study accepts that self-reports have shortcomings. Not all experiences of the courses would have been readily accessible through the teachers' conscious reflections. This makes it difficult to construct a complete picture of the experience, challenges and identify all salient factors within a particular workshop or training.

Practical implications

Although the adoption of teaching and learning to online platforms is undoubtedly the way to maintain continuity of learning for students, it has also unveiled glaring inequities in Sarawak. Therefore, continuous and personalised professional development needs to be provided, focussing on pedagogical and technological support. There is a need to embrace these changes as a long-term response that will develop and improve over the next few years. That response should include better infrastructure, policies for quality improvement, accessibility standards and strategic plans for continuous access in the future. This includes advocating for platforms that can fit into the core technology environment and for teachers to adopt an innovative mindset.

Originality/value

In light of the complex and multifaceted challenge of transitioning to online learning in Sarawak Malaysia, it was evident that the need for innovative solutions to optimize educational endeavours has become accelerated. To ensure that students are well-supported and widening participation and access to education, it is imperative that the education disruption be embraced. This starts with addressing teachers' digital literacy through a professional development programme of online reaching.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Anurag Varma and Mohammad Shoeb Jafri

The purpose of this paper is to have an overview of how Indian institutions offering undergraduate architecture programs have responded to the pandemic situation. It seeks…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to have an overview of how Indian institutions offering undergraduate architecture programs have responded to the pandemic situation. It seeks to appraise the alternative approaches adopted for teaching-learning, communication, assignment and evaluation and assess their effectiveness for progressive improvisations or integration with pedagogy. The paper articulates a view on the suitability of online teaching for architecture education in India, on basis of educators' experiences of teaching during the pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted for obtaining primary data from the educators given the paucity of information. The questions elicited structured information on aspects of the transition process, IT/online platform and tools, the efficacy of online teaching-learning and trajectory of blended learning.

Findings

All institutions managed the transition to online teaching without much difficulty. However, the paper raises the need for professional training and feedback from students. One-third of the respondents express satisfaction with online teaching, despite low satisfaction about the effectiveness of online teaching of a design studio. The results convey the need for more engagement with digital tools and representational software on integrated platforms. The study finds consensus on the future potential of blended learning and advocates developing an integrated framework and curriculum for architecture education in India.

Originality/value

The paper synthesizes viewpoints on online teaching-learning of architecture program in wake of the pandemic from an educators' perspective. The emergent perspectives are viewed dialogically in context of global voices to articulate a future trajectory of blended learning in the domain of architecture education.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Laura Zizka and Gaby Probst

With the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe in March 2020, higher education institutions (HEIs) worldwide were confronted with creating online courses to complete…

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Abstract

Purpose

With the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe in March 2020, higher education institutions (HEIs) worldwide were confronted with creating online courses to complete the semester. While emphasizing positive elements such as flexibility and innovative solutions, the literature focused on numerous faculty problems such as online fatigue, emotional well-being and stress. This paper aims to explore faculty perceptions of teaching during the exceptional circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Two surveys, in the first week and at the end of the semester, were conducted at a business school in Switzerland via the program Lima. A total of 19 faculty members participated in the survey. Of the participants, 56.7% responded in the first survey and 70.9% responded in the second.

Findings

The findings revealed that the faculty’s impressions of their online courses remained positive. The most significant issue cited was time. According to faculty estimations, more than ten additional hours per week were spent preparing for online courses. Nonetheless, many faculty members reported interest in continuing online practices in their future courses.

Practical implications

The COVID-19 pandemic pushed HEIs to embrace the digital revolution while teaching in a competence-oriented mode. However, moving forward, HEIs must mitigate the long-term effects by careful planning and evaluating their digital readiness as an institution and offering training for their faculty and students when necessary.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the existing literature by analyzing one stakeholder group, i.e. faculty members, and their perceptions of teaching during a worldwide pandemic.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Fang Zhao

The quality of online higher education is often subject to scepticism and criticism. Is the quality of teaching and learning in the virtual classroom the same as in the…

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Abstract

The quality of online higher education is often subject to scepticism and criticism. Is the quality of teaching and learning in the virtual classroom the same as in the conventional classroom? That is the question often raised by the stakeholders of universities. The present literature review has found that there has been a great deal of research about technology implementation in online education with regard to cost and efficiency savings, along with a number of studies on online pedagogy. Drawing on the current principal literature, this study explores a range of issues affecting the quality of online higher education; examines a variety of perspectives on criteria for quality online teaching and learning; and proposes a methodological framework for the measurement of both the process and outcomes of online teaching and learning. Considers that the enhancement of quality and effectiveness of online higher education requires a framework to be implemented within universities. The proposed framework provides a practical guide to the stakeholders of universities in the assessment of quality of the online teaching and learning.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Jay Andrew Cohen

As online learning becomes more ubiquitous and particularly in consideration of the current need to move classroom based teaching online given Covid-19, it seems opportune…

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Abstract

Purpose

As online learning becomes more ubiquitous and particularly in consideration of the current need to move classroom based teaching online given Covid-19, it seems opportune to address the pedagogical differences between online and face-to-face teaching, so that online delivery moves beyond the paradigms of its face-to-face counterpart, such as the lecture. This paper explores the need for a fit for purpose pedagogical approach for online learning, as opposed to one in which a classroom based pedagogy is applied, often rather clumsily to an online learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The engagement of students in an online learning environment is closely associated with student success. The argument is that students who are actively engaged are more likely to learn and to achieve greater success. Student engagement is facilitated through the design and arrangement of the learning material, and by the presence, attitude and the facilitation of learning by the online teacher or trainer.

Findings

Rather than presenting any research findings this paper simply explores concepts relating to online learning design and online teaching.

Practical implications

The practical implication of this paper are better alignment between teaching/training interventions and learning design.

Originality/value

This paper is a viewpoint paper and is original. This paper has not been submitted elsewhere. 10; 10;This paper would be a valuable resource for those new to online learning or those looking to establish a fit for purpose approach to online learning.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Robert Detmering, Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles, Samantha McClellan and Rosalinda Hernandez Linares

This paper aims to provide an introductory overview and selected annotated bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy across all…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an introductory overview and selected annotated bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy across all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

It introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2014.

Findings

It provides information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Heather J. Leslie

The purpose of this paper is to describe an online faculty development pilot course on how to engage students online. A framework was used, referred to as the Trifecta of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe an online faculty development pilot course on how to engage students online. A framework was used, referred to as the Trifecta of Student Engagement, for the design of the course. The Trifecta of Student Engagement proposes that students, in order to be fully engaged in a course, need to be engaged with their course content, with their peers and with their instructor. The course has three units of content that each correspond to the Trifecta of Student Engagement. This course has gone through one pilot with faculty and has impacted students and faculty positively.

Design/methodology/approach

An online faculty development course was piloted with eight faculty members across a range of disciplines who participated in the program. After taking the course, they had to apply the Trifecta of Student Engagement framework to a course they taught and share what they did via written report, webinar, or web presentation. This study summarized the faculty participants’ written reports and presentations as well as provided a qualitative evaluation on the impact this course had on students and faculty.

Findings

After faculty applied the Trifecta of Student Engagement framework to courses taught, faculty saw an improvement in student engagement, satisfaction, learning and achievement. Three faculty surveyed students to determine their engagement and satisfaction and found students to respond positively to the use of tools and activities for student-to-content engagement, student-to-student engagement and student-to-instructor engagement. Two faculty examined student grades to determine if there were changes in student outcomes. One professor saw average grades increase by 11 percent. Another professor saw grades improve by 8 percent. She also found that student assessment of learning increased by 0.57. Both faculty attributed the improvement to the effectiveness of the teaching strategies employed.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to the eight faculty who participated in the pilot. Some faculty used methods to attempt to measure the impacts of their teaching practices by surveying students and looking at student performance data. A second pilot is needed for additional faculty to take the course and apply the Trifecta of Engagement framework to generate more data for impact.

Practical implications

Institutions looking to create an online teaching professional development course for faculty can utilize the Trifecta of Student Engagement framework for their course design. Additionally, faculty can read about tools and strategies that they can immediately apply to create more student-to-content engagement, student-to-student engagement and student-to-instructor engagement.

Social implications

Faculty can be more intentional in how they engage students in their online course experience.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the literature on faculty development regarding student-centered teaching practices. Other institutions looking to create a faculty development course or program that utilizes a student-centered framework may find aspects of this paper useful for their own online teaching professional development initiatives.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

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1 – 10 of over 30000