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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Sharinne Crawford, Stacey Hokke, Jan M. Nicholson, Lawrie Zion, Jayne Lucke, Patrick Keyzer and Naomi Hackworth

The internet offers an opportunity for researchers to engage participants in research in a cost-effective and timely manner. Yet the use of the internet as a research tool…

Abstract

Purpose

The internet offers an opportunity for researchers to engage participants in research in a cost-effective and timely manner. Yet the use of the internet as a research tool (internet research) comes with a range of ethical concerns, and the rapidly changing online environment poses challenges for both researchers and ethics committees. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the key ethical issues of using the internet to recruit, retain and trace participants in public health research, from the perspectives of researchers and human research ethics committee (HREC) members.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with eight public health researchers and seven HREC members in Australia to explore the key ethical issues of using the internet to engage research participants.

Findings

The study identified commonalities between researchers and HREC members regarding the utility and ethical complexity of using the internet to recruit, retain and trace research participants. The need for guidance and support regarding internet research, for both groups, was highlighted, as well as the need for flexibility and responsiveness in formal ethical processes.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the understanding of how the internet is used to engage participants in public health research and the ethical context in which that occurs. Supporting the ethical conduct of internet research will benefit those involved in research, including researchers, HRECs, organisations and research participants.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Nickolas Ollington, Jenny Gibb and Mark Harcourt

The increased popularity in using online social networks by recruiters has received much positive attention, particularly in the popular press. Using social network theory…

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10689

Abstract

Purpose

The increased popularity in using online social networks by recruiters has received much positive attention, particularly in the popular press. Using social network theory this paper aims to examine how the structure and governance mechanisms of these networks can assist this process. The authors ask: how do recruiters use online social networks to effectively attract and screen prospective job applicants?

Design/methodology/approach

The semi‐structured interview approach is used to gather data from 25 recruitment specialists.

Findings

The connector role is identified as a specific attraction mechanism recruiters use to create numerous weak ties, where some are so weak they barely constitute ties at all. The authors then identify branding, transparency and data specificity as three mechanisms recruiters use to strengthen these ties when performing the attracting and screening functions.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to analyse online recruitment, using social network theory, and hence it has important implications for both academic and practitioner audiences involved in recruitment.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Eleanna Galanaki

Online recruitment is a new tool, at the disposal of the HR departments, which has known a phenomenal success in very short time. This paper presents the findings of some…

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22572

Abstract

Online recruitment is a new tool, at the disposal of the HR departments, which has known a phenomenal success in very short time. This paper presents the findings of some descriptive research, involving UK IT companies. The research tries to identify the effect that the perceived attributes of the practice have on the decision of companies to recruit through the Internet. The attributes tested are cost effectiveness; recruitment cycle time; response rate; quality of response; impact on the image of the company; targeting of specific niches; targeting of the passive job‐seeker; worldwide coverage; necessary resources, time and effort to implement; attractiveness of the mean to the job seekers (especially IT professionals and young graduates); risk of overload of answers; and impact of the size and reputation of the company. The paper provides an insight on how the companies perceive and value online recruitment.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Alan D. Smith and William T. Rupp

Effective leadership of human capital is a major managerial issue. Hiring and keeping employees is key to sustainable competitive advantage. E‐recruiting as a general…

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9280

Abstract

Effective leadership of human capital is a major managerial issue. Hiring and keeping employees is key to sustainable competitive advantage. E‐recruiting as a general process is job‐specific and offers computer‐assisted screening interviews and statistical prediction to aid in reducing recruiting costs, time‐to‐hire and employee turnover. This paper examines the application of this technology to recruiting and retaining knowledge workers in an e‐commerce, information‐intensive environment.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Bernard J. Jansen, Karen J. Jansen and Amanda Spink

The web is now a significant component of the recruitment and job search process. However, very little is known about how companies and job seekers use the web, and the…

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9083

Abstract

Purpose

The web is now a significant component of the recruitment and job search process. However, very little is known about how companies and job seekers use the web, and the ultimate effectiveness of this process. The specific research questions guiding this study are: how do people search for job‐related information on the web? How effective are these searches? And how likely are job seekers to find an appropriate job posting or application?

Design/methodology/approach

The data used to examine these questions come from job seekers submitting job‐related queries to a major web search engine at three points in time over a five‐year period.

Findings

Results indicate that individuals seeking job information generally submit only one query with several terms and over 45 percent of job‐seeking queries contain a specific location reference. Of the documents retrieved, findings suggest that only 52 percent are relevant and only 40 percent of job‐specific searches retrieve job postings.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides an important contribution to web research and online recruiting literature. The data come from actual web searches, providing a realistic glimpse into how job seekers are actually using the web.

Practical implications

The results of this research can assist organizations in seeking to use the web as part of their recruiting efforts, in designing corporate recruiting web sites, and in developing web systems to support job seeking and recruiting.

Originality/value

This research is one of the first studies to investigate job searching on the web using longitudinal real world data.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2013

Jean Wolf, Jeremy Wilhelm, Jesse Casas and Sudeshna Sen

Purpose — The Regional Household Travel Survey (RHTS) was a large-scale regional household travel survey that covered 28 counties in the New York, North New Jersey, and…

Abstract

Purpose — The Regional Household Travel Survey (RHTS) was a large-scale regional household travel survey that covered 28 counties in the New York, North New Jersey, and Connecticut regions (i.e., the New York City “megaregion”). Data collection for the survey began in October 2010 and concluded in November 2011.

The chapter discusses the multiple modes and methodologies used in the RHTS, and presents the participation rates and trip rates obtained using this multimodal approach.

Methodology/approach — This survey used a combination of web, telephone, and mail-out/mail-back methods to collect household and travel information from approximately 18,800 households. Ten percent of the sampled households participated in the survey by using wearable global positioning system (GPS) devices that collected detailed travel data which, in turn, were processed and presented back to the households in a GPS-based prompted recall interview administered by web or telephone. The GPS component was used to generate trip rate correction factors for the other 90% diary-based households.

Findings — This large regional survey was the first to use this specific combination of methods and technologies, and provides many insights into the success of targeted survey modes and methods for different population groups.

Details

Transport Survey Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78-190288-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Sameer Kumar

The past decade has witnessed dramatic changes in the types and composition of the workforce. A greater number of employees are able to work from home. Job seekers have…

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3275

Abstract

The past decade has witnessed dramatic changes in the types and composition of the workforce. A greater number of employees are able to work from home. Job seekers have better access to available jobs today than ever before. Likewise, employers have greater access to available potential candidates. In this context, a variety of approaches including intelligent agents to facilitate the search for employment are reviewed. The impact of the Internet on human resources management from employees’ and employers’ perspectives and resulting trends are analyzed. Based on the author’s industry interactions and statistics, answers are sought to many pertinent questions relating to quality human resource initiatives to link with a technologically adept workforce. A human capital supply chain management framework is proposed which has decision‐support capability in an Internet environment that provides value‐based relationships between partners.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 103 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2021

Chin-Ching Yin, Yi-Ching Hsieh, Hung-Chang Chiu and Jhih-Ling Yu

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, this study applies social presence theory to explore the influences of public self-awareness on consumers’ choice…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, this study applies social presence theory to explore the influences of public self-awareness on consumers’ choice inconsistency and post-choice satisfaction. Second, the authors investigate how time pressure moderates the effects of self-awareness on choice inconsistency and post-choice satisfaction so that online sellers can better align their marketing strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

This research consists of two studies. Study 1 conducted a 3 (self-awareness: public/private/control) × 2 (time pressure: high/none) experiment, and 311 online participants were recruited to explore the influence of public self-awareness and time pressure. Study 2 used a 3 (self-awareness: public/private/control) × 2 (time pressure: high/no) × 2 (self-consciousness: high/low) quasi-experiments, and the authors used 652 online participants to examine the effect of self-awareness, time pressure and public self-consciousness on choice inconsistency and post-choice satisfaction.

Findings

The results indicate that publicly self-aware consumers under high time pressure show greater inconsistency than those under no time pressure. Also, people with higher public self-consciousness exhibited higher choice inconsistency and post-choice satisfaction in public self-awareness situations than those in private self-awareness and control conditions.

Research limitations/implications

To generalize the results, this study should be replicated using more heterogeneous populations in diverse regions and cultures, as well as other product categories.

Practical implications

This study explores the implications of evoking self-awareness during online consumption and the online purchase process by observing the moderating effect of self-consciousness and time pressure. The findings provide insights to marketing practitioners who seek to increase their companies’ competitive advantage and profits through effective online manipulations of consumers’ self-awareness.

Originality/value

Extant research does not address how time pressure affects the relationships among public self-awareness, choice inconsistency and post-choice satisfaction. In addition, prior research only focused on public self-awareness in customer consumption. This study bridges these gaps and has implications for e-commerce, consumer behavior and relationship marketing research fields.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Emma Parry and Hugh Wilson

The internet is initially hailed as the future of recruitment and is expected to replace other media as the preferred recruitment method, but the adoption of online

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29258

Abstract

Purpose

The internet is initially hailed as the future of recruitment and is expected to replace other media as the preferred recruitment method, but the adoption of online recruitment has not been as comprehensively predicted. In addition, empirical research regarding online recruitment from an organisational perspective is sparse. This paper aims to examine the reasons behind an organisation's decision to use online recruitment, and reports on the development of a model of the factors affecting the adoption of this recruitment method.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses in‐depth interviews and a survey of human resource (HR) managers with recruitment responsibility. The factors that affect the adoption of online recruitment are explored, and related to Rogers's diffusion of innovation theory (DIT) and Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour (TPB).

Findings

Factors related to the adoption of corporate web sites and commercial jobs boards are found to be different, with positive beliefs/relative advantage, subjective norms and negative beliefs emerging in the case of corporate web sites and positive beliefs/relative advantage and compatibility for jobs boards. These results provide some fit with both Ajzen's and Rogers' factors.

Originality/value

This paper addresses an important area that is under‐researched academically and provides a basis for further research into how organisations may adopt online recruitment successfully.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Lim Ban Seng

This article discusses the potential benefits of using the Internet to conduct business — to boost business productivity and to enhance business competitiveness. Six key…

Abstract

This article discusses the potential benefits of using the Internet to conduct business — to boost business productivity and to enhance business competitiveness. Six key Internet tools and how they can be used to support online commerce are briefly introduced. Ways in which businesses are capitalising on the use of the Internet as a major strategic tool for commerce are described. The extent to which local firms in Singapore are tapping into the Internet to increase business profitability is also outlined. While there are currently some problems hampering a more widespread adoption of Internet commerce, chief of which is the issue of security, there is nevertheless determined and concerted effort to resolve these.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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