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Book part
Publication date: 14 July 2014

Peter Groenewegen and Christine Moser

Online communities form a challenging and still-evolving field for social network research. We highlight two themes that are at the core of social network literature…

Abstract

Online communities form a challenging and still-evolving field for social network research. We highlight two themes that are at the core of social network literature: formative processes and structures, and discuss how these might be relevant in the context of online communities. Processes of tie formation might evolve differently in online communities. Second, we discuss how network structures emerge in different ways than previously studied, and should therefore be interpreted differently.

Details

Contemporary Perspectives on Organizational Social Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-751-1

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Nickolas Ollington, Jenny Gibb and Mark Harcourt

The increased popularity in using online social networks by recruiters has received much positive attention, particularly in the popular press. Using social network theory…

Abstract

Purpose

The increased popularity in using online social networks by recruiters has received much positive attention, particularly in the popular press. Using social network theory this paper aims to examine how the structure and governance mechanisms of these networks can assist this process. The authors ask: how do recruiters use online social networks to effectively attract and screen prospective job applicants?

Design/methodology/approach

The semi‐structured interview approach is used to gather data from 25 recruitment specialists.

Findings

The connector role is identified as a specific attraction mechanism recruiters use to create numerous weak ties, where some are so weak they barely constitute ties at all. The authors then identify branding, transparency and data specificity as three mechanisms recruiters use to strengthen these ties when performing the attracting and screening functions.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to analyse online recruitment, using social network theory, and hence it has important implications for both academic and practitioner audiences involved in recruitment.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Helen Donelan, Clem Herman, Karen Kear and Gill Kirkup

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how women working in science, engineering and technology use online networking, for career and professional development purposes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how women working in science, engineering and technology use online networking, for career and professional development purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

A combined qualitative and quantitative approach is taken, using interviews for the first phase of the research and online surveys for the second. The findings are discussed and presented with reference to theories on career development and in the context of recent work on women's networks and online social networking.

Findings

The paper defines a typology of online networks and identifies the motives women have for engaging with the different types. The data imply that women are successfully using online networks to find support, advice and collaboration from women working in similar environments. However, the data only identify a few examples where the use of online networks has led to a specific new job opportunity.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited by the samples used, as they were self‐selected. In the first phase of the research, the sample was biased in favour of those using information and communication technologies. In the second phase, women using some form of online network were purposefully targeted in order to understand the motives and benefits associated with these activities.

Originality/value

The paper provides new insights into how professional women are networking online. It extends recent work into women's networks and networking strategies and presents a timely exploration into how these are being affected by the growth of online social networking.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Zeljka Hadija, Susan B. Barnes and Neil Hair

The purpose of this paper is to focus on college students, users of online social networks, as main sources of information that helps advertisers understand the ways in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on college students, users of online social networks, as main sources of information that helps advertisers understand the ways in which advertisements are perceived online.

Design/methodology/approach

Results were reached through qualitative research. Personal in‐depth interviews, utilizing Zaltman Metaphor Elicitation Technique (ZMET), were conducted among 20 college students. Interviews consisted of using screenshots of advertisements in online social networks to uncover respondents' reactions.

Findings

It was generally concluded that the users of online social networks do not dislike advertisements, but they simply do not notice them. Other content found in online social networks mitigates the attractiveness of the advertisements. Hence, the respondents reported that the brand recognition in online social networks was found to be much lower than the one created through other media channels.

Practical implications

Advertising in online social networks is a major unexplored advertising area. Interactivity on the internet shifts the ways in which users perceive advertising, and whether they perceive it at all. The paper discusses content that catches users' attention and its relation to advertisements.

Originality/value

Through literature review it has been revealed that no similar research exists. The findings of this research will aid advertisers in recognizing the possibility of advertising to the online social networks' population, taking into consideration different needs, and preferences of such users.

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Jin Young Chung

The present study aims to clarify how online friendships between local residents and tourists are made in a hospitality exchange network, one of the not-for-profit sharing…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to clarify how online friendships between local residents and tourists are made in a hospitality exchange network, one of the not-for-profit sharing economy platforms. Specifically, the study empirically examines three topics: the properties of dyadic relationships in the platform; the effect of face-to-face interactions on online friendships in the platform; and the role of locals in building host-guest relationships in the hospitality exchange network.

Design/methodology/approach

Social networks data in CouchSurfing.org were collected and analyzed using a social network analysis (SNA) program. Along with the descriptive analysis of the actors in the online hospitality network, several SNA indicators, including the degree of centrality, density and centralization, were measured to explore the nature of the network and identify the gatekeepers.

Findings

Findings suggest that latent ties between tourists and hosts are likely to be manifested through face-to-face events. In particular, local people play central roles in establishing host-guest relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the body of knowledge on the sharing economy in hospitality by synthesizing two areas in the literature, the host-guest framework and the online hospitality networks.

Originality/value

The social psychological aspects of the sharing economy have yet to receive attention from hospitality scholars. In addition, studies have largely focused on profit-driven models in the sharing economy (e.g. Airbnb). This study fills this gap by examining the host and guest behavior empirically in one of the not-for-profit hospitality sharing economy platforms.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Sheau Fen Crystal Yap and Christina Kwai Choi Lee

The purpose of this paper is to examine online community loyalty through an extension of the theory of planned behaviour by incorporating motivational drivers of enjoyment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine online community loyalty through an extension of the theory of planned behaviour by incorporating motivational drivers of enjoyment and compatibility and the moderating role of consumer traits.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using an online survey of 382 Facebook users in Malaysia. Structural equation modelling was used to assess the hypothesised relationships.

Findings

Findings reveal that individuals’ attitude towards social network usage is associated with three factors: social influence, compatibility and enjoyment; attitude and usage behaviour are the determinants of online community loyalty. In addition, moderating effects are found in innovativeness and social network user experience.

Research limitations/implications

Generalisation of the results to other contexts or populations should be made with caution given the study's focus on Facebook and its use of non-probability sampling. Future research can cross-validate or extend the theoretical model across different samples and/or virtual community settings.

Practical implications

This study highlights the importance of designing online brand community web sites which are not only appealing and enjoyable but also acts as an outlet for its members to build upon their experiences and showcase their innovativeness.

Originality/value

This research contributes to a better understanding of how personal factors can either strengthen or attenuate a member's loyalty to his or her online community. The research framework developed in this study can serve as a springboard for future research to examine other virtual community engagement such as blogging, online advertising and online public relation activities.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Abstract

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Digital Media and the Greek Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-328-9

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Book part
Publication date: 28 June 1991

Karen Horny

Abstract

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Library Technical Services: Operations and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-795-0

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2020

Tyler Prochnow, Megan S. Patterson, Logan Hartnell and M. Renée Umstattd Meyer

Increases in video game use have led to mental health concerns, citing greater risk for depressive symptoms (DS) and reduced “in-real-life” (IRL) social involvement…

Abstract

Purpose

Increases in video game use have led to mental health concerns, citing greater risk for depressive symptoms (DS) and reduced “in-real-life” (IRL) social involvement. However, recent studies have uncovered potential social benefits for online gaming. Many games provide avenues to extend real life relationships and make new online friendships. The purpose of this pilot study is to use social network analysis to determine associations between connections and DS in a gaming community.

Design/methodology/approach

As a pilot study, members of an online gaming site were asked to report demographic characteristics, DS, IRL social support, online social support and IRL people and members of the online community with whom they spoke to about important life matters. Multi-level modeling was used to parse variance described by demographic characteristics, IRL measures and online measures. Linear network autocorrelation modeling (LNAM) was used to determine relationships between network connections and DS.

Findings

Members (n = 37; µ = 24.76 years old, SD = 6.55; 100% male; 89.2% white) on average felt DS’ “not at all” to “several days” over the past two weeks. Multi-level modeling including online network measures explained 50% of variance (R2 = 0.50, F (9,27) = 2.98, p = 0.01); online connections were associated with DS (ß = 0.46). LNAM indicated DS were associated with IRL support (ß = −2.66), IRL connections (ß = 1.81), online support (ß = 2.40) and network effects (ß = 0.06), which indicates that a gamer’s DS were similar to those of their online connections.

Originality/value

Members with more DS may be seeking help via online channels. This may be important for future research to consider alternative forms of help-seeking behavior.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2020

Tyler Prochnow, Megan S. Patterson and Logan Hartnell

The increase of videogame use has raised concerns regarding mental health of gamers (e.g. social isolation, depression); however, online gaming may offer the benefit of…

Abstract

Purpose

The increase of videogame use has raised concerns regarding mental health of gamers (e.g. social isolation, depression); however, online gaming may offer the benefit of social connectivity. Many games provide ways for people to meet and interact, providing social opportunities difficult to come by for some young adults. One way to investigate social connection is through social network analysis, which explores the influence of connections on behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to analyze factors related to social connections within an online gaming community, with an emphasis on the influence of social support and depressive symptoms on network ties.

Design/methodology/approach

All members of an online gaming site were asked to report demographics, site use, depressive symptoms, “in-real-life” (IRL) social support, and online social support. Members were also asked to nominate those in their gaming network with whom they spoke to about important life matters. Moran’s I determined the spatial autocorrelation of depressive symptoms and IRL support within the network. Exponential random graph modeling determined factors significantly associated with tie presence between members.

Findings

Members (n=37) were significantly more likely to speak to other members about important life matters if they reported more site hours, more depressive symptoms, and less IRL support. Depressive symptoms and IRL support were not significantly spatially autocorrelated within this network.

Originality/value

Results suggest members may be filling an IRL social support deficit with friends they have met online. Additionally, members who reported more depressive symptoms may be seeking help from informal online connections through online gaming.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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