Search results

1 – 10 of over 56000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2015

Brian Joe Rice

As teacher education moves online, there is an increasing need for teacher educators who subscribe to relational stances that attend to and enact liberating pedagogies…

Abstract

Purpose

As teacher education moves online, there is an increasing need for teacher educators who subscribe to relational stances that attend to and enact liberating pedagogies with preservice teachers preparing to teach and inservice teachers who come to online courses for professional development.

Approach

This chapter explores common frameworks for interactive relational models of teaching from John Dewey, Lev Vygotsky, and Paulo Friere and then proposes, using examples from the author’s practice, how these models translate into online contexts.

Findings

Diversity in education calls for increased awareness of individuals using a relational stance. This stance should apply both to schoolchildren as well as the teacher candidates and teachers in development that are coming to teacher education to build and improve their practice.

Research implications

More research on relationality in online learning is necessary. This research should take shape through using theories that are complex enough to provide insights that marry the pedagogical with the relational aspects of teaching as part of a comprehensive teacher education experience.

Value

This chapter makes a valuable contribution to research in teaching online through its thorough inquiry into theories of learning and teaching and they apply – or do not – online.

Details

Exploring Pedagogies for Diverse Learners Online
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-672-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

Tabitha L. James, Jie Zhang, Han Li, Jennifer L. Ziegelmayer and Eduardo D. Villacis-Calderon

Most students are considered digital natives and are presumably equipped to handle extensive technology use. However, online learning turns students into involuntary…

Abstract

Purpose

Most students are considered digital natives and are presumably equipped to handle extensive technology use. However, online learning turns students into involuntary telecommuters when it is the primary modality. The prevailing trends of online learning, digital socialization, telehealth and other online services, combined with remote work has increased students' reliance on information and communications technologies (ICTs) for all purposes, which may be overwhelming. We examine how technology overload strains the ability of online learning to meet students' basic psychological needs (BPNs), which can decrease positive outcomes such as academic enjoyment and personal performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected via an online survey of 542 university students and the proposed model was tested using partial least squares (PLS) regression.

Findings

We find that technology overload can diminish the positive relationship between online learning intensity and BPNs satisfaction, which is alarming because BPNs satisfaction is critical to students' positive experiences. Moreover, we find that technology overload and lack of technology experience can directly drive BPNs frustration, which decreases positive outcomes and increases academic anxiety.

Originality/value

We extend a theoretical framework for telecommuting to examine online learning. Additionally, we consider the role of technology overload and experience both as drivers and as moderators of students' BPNs satisfaction and frustration in online learning. Our results provide valuable insights that can inform efforts to rebalance the deployment of ICTs to facilitate online educational experiences.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

Tsai-Yun Mou and Chia-Pin Kao

This study explored preservice and in-service early childhood teachers' online academic learning beliefs and strategies.

Abstract

Purpose

This study explored preservice and in-service early childhood teachers' online academic learning beliefs and strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Two hundred preservice and in-service teachers respectively from Taiwan participated in this research. A focus group discussion was carried out concerning the development of the questionnaires. The exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis confirmed good construct validity and reliabilities of the survey.

Findings

The survey results showed that in-service teachers generally held more sophisticated learning beliefs than the preservice teachers in all scales. Also, in-service teachers responded with a higher level of online academic learning strategies than the preservice teachers did. Regarding their online experiences, preservice teachers who spent an appropriate amount of time online had more positive beliefs than those with excessive online experiences. However, preservice teachers did not reveal employment of their ICT literacy in their online academic learning strategies. It was found that those in-service teachers with more online learning experience also showed higher levels of online academic learning beliefs. They used more deep strategies in their online academic learning.

Practical implications

The findings of this study could provide insights for the development of online academic learning ability in preschool teacher training programs.

Originality/value

(1) In-service teachers generally held more sophisticated learning beliefs than the preservice teachers. (2) Preservice teachers who spent an appropriate amount of time online had more positive beliefs than those with excessive online experiences. (3) Preservice teachers did not reveal employment of their ICT literacy in their online academic learning strategies. (4) In-service teachers with more online learning experience also showed higher levels of online academic learning beliefs. They used more deep strategies in their online academic learning.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Blessy Prabha Valsaraj, Bhakti More, Seena Biju, Valsaraj Payini and Vinod Pallath

During COVID 19 pandemic emergency remote teaching (ERT) in higher education emerged and faculty members had to go through a transformation in teaching-learning without…

Downloads
151

Abstract

Purpose

During COVID 19 pandemic emergency remote teaching (ERT) in higher education emerged and faculty members had to go through a transformation in teaching-learning without preparedness. The purpose of the study is to understand the instructional delivery experiences of faculty members, explore the challenges and how they overcame these challenges during the transition from traditional classroom teaching to ERT.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach using phenomenology is adapted for the study. The study is conducted in selected renowned government and private universities offering professional education in India, Malaysia, Oman and the United Arab Emirates. Data analysis is using NVivo, data management software, based on Ricouer’s theory of interpretation.

Findings

The findings identify unique challenges and opportunities in faculty experiences during the implementation of ERT and universities require more preparedness in implementing a revised pedagogy. Addressing these unique challenges is, therefore, essential in effective change management and ensuring the effectiveness of instructional delivery.

Research limitations/implications

The study comprises faculty experiences from only selected countries (the United Arab Emirates, Oman, India and Malaysia) and disciplines such as business studies, design and architecture, engineering, hospitality and tourism management, medicine and nursing. The research contributes towards change management and adaptability strategies during emergency transitions.

Practical implications

The study has implications in the field of education, administration, research and society at large. This is an era of change that has witnessed tremendous possibilities of digital technology in enhancing remote teaching and learning at all levels of education worldwide. The study enumerates the factors influencing the paradigm shift in the pedagogy for present and future higher education. The present study also highlights how challenging this transformation was to the lives of professional academics and emphasized how effectively the faculty need to be mentored for the future by the administration. Future research can envisage effective tools and techniques for strengthening professional education at universities. The social context and human experiences in ERT and their impact on the process of learning are also addressed in the study.

Social implications

The study aims to understand the social context and human experiences in the process of ERT and their impact on the process of learning.

Originality/value

The findings of the study would throw light into the factors influencing the paradigm shift in the pedagogy for present and future higher education.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Bonnie McBain, Antony Drew, Carole James, Liam Phelan, Keith M Harris and Jennifer Archer

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the experiences of tertiary students learning oral presentation skills in a range of online and blended learning contexts across…

Downloads
1229

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the experiences of tertiary students learning oral presentation skills in a range of online and blended learning contexts across diverse disciplines.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was designed as a “federation” of trials of diverse online oral communications assessment tasks (OOCATs). Tasks were set in ten courses offered across all five faculties at University of Newcastle, Australia. The authors collected and analysed data about students’ experiences of tasks they completed through an anonymous online survey.

Findings

Students’ engagement with the task was extremely positive but also highly varied. This diversity of student experience can inform teaching, and in doing so, can support student equity. By understanding what students think hinders or facilitates their learning, and which students have these experiences, instructors are able to make adjustments to their teaching which address both real and perceived issues. Student experience in this study highlighted five very clear themes in relation to the student experience of undertaking online oral communications tasks which all benefit from nuanced responses by the instructor: relevance; capacity; technology; time; and support.

Practical implications

Using well-designed OOCATs that diverge from more traditional written assessments can help students successfully engage with course content and develop oral communication skills. The student experience can be used to inform teaching by catering for different student learning styles and experience. Student centred approaches such as this allows instructors to reflect upon the assumptions they hold about their students and how they learn. This understanding can help inform adjustments to teaching approaches to support improved student experience of learning oral communications tasks.

Originality/value

The importance of learning oral communication skills in tertiary education is widely acknowledged internationally, however, there is limited research on how to teach these skills online in a way that is student centred. This research makes a contribution toward addressing that gap.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 58 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 March 2020

Boonlert Watjatrakul

Personality traits and perceived value have been the focus for research in online learning adoption. However, there is a lack of understanding of how the effects of…

Abstract

Purpose

Personality traits and perceived value have been the focus for research in online learning adoption. However, there is a lack of understanding of how the effects of perceived value on online learning adoption vary according to the different personality traits and the levels of a personality trait. This study explores the moderating roles of the Big Five personality traits (i.e. neuroticism, extraversion, conscientiousness, openness to experience, and agreeableness) in the relationships between the perceived value (i.e. value for money, quality, emotional value, and social value) and intention to study online courses.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey questionnaire was used to collect data from university students. This study used the partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) method to measure the quality of the formative and reflective constructs and examine the moderating effects of the five personality traits in four models. The regression of intention to study online courses on the perceived value at the different levels of a personality trait was analyzed by the simple slope analysis approach.

Findings

The study found that particular personality traits moderate the relationships between the perceived value and intention to study online courses. Neuroticism and openness to experience have the moderating effects on the relationship between perceived value for money and intention to study online courses. Neuroticism is the only personality trait that moderates the effect of perceived emotional value on intention to study online courses. In addition, the different levels of a personality trait differentially moderate the effects of the perceived value on intention to study online courses.

Originality/value

This study is considered among the first research attempting to explore the moderating roles of the Big Five personality traits in the context of online learning adoption. It bridges the research gap in online learning literature and generalizes the impacts of perceived value on online learning adoption to the different personality traits and the levels of a personality trait. The results provide guidance for educational institutions to develop an effective online learning strategy by creating and communicating the right value propositions to the right group of students based on their personality traits.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 37 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Cindy Chen, Sabrina Landa, Aivanna Padilla and Jasmine Yur-Austin

In response to coronavirus disease 2019, California State University Long Beach (CSULB) announced mandatory online course conversions on March 12, 2020. The College of…

Downloads
1444

Abstract

Purpose

In response to coronavirus disease 2019, California State University Long Beach (CSULB) announced mandatory online course conversions on March 12, 2020. The College of Business designed a Student Online Learning Experience Survey to explore learners' experience, needs, expectations and challenges in the online learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The time-sensitive survey questions were administered using Qualtrics with Institutional Review Board approval. The authors used 5-point Likert scales to rate students' experience and satisfaction and performed statistical analysis. They assessed students' written comments to further corroborate statistical findings.

Findings

The results identify students' satisfaction are highly correlated to content coverage and interaction of online learning technologies. A combination of BeachBoard, Zoom, e-mails and publisher's website is valued most by the learners. Project-based experiential design is ranked #1 by graduate students. Noticeably, the upward trend of satisfaction with online modality from sophomore to senior is probably attributable to learners' maturity and number of years studied at CSU system. Overall, students generally dislike proctoring devices due to concerns of privacy, inequalities, mental stress, etc.

Practical implications

The evidence-based results offer innovative pedagogical recommendations for business education in higher education.

Originality/value

While prior studies examine student perceptions and satisfaction within the online education system, the study aims to deeply investigate the students' experience after a large-scale two-week institutional emergency course conversion mandate. This study systematically reviews students' experience with four aspects of online learning: (1) the adequacy of instructional designs; (2) the effectiveness of technology; (3) the appropriateness of the online learning material and (4) the integrity of online assessment and testing tools.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Saba Alnusairat, Duaa Al Maani and Amer Al-Jokhadar

The purpose of this study is to examine the attitudes of students in higher educational institutions in Jordan towards the use of online design studios during coronavirus…

Downloads
1108

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the attitudes of students in higher educational institutions in Jordan towards the use of online design studios during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown and discusses how their use could enhance the learning process.

Design/methodology/approach

615 undergraduate students studying architecture in Jordanian universities were recruited to explore the factors that constituted and affected their perceptions of online design studios.

Findings

The findings of this study highlight that many of the participants felt uncertain about aspects of their online learning experience and wanted more guidance and support. Reasons of this disengagement include technical factors, such as poor network quality and lack of familiarity with the new applications. Students and tutors' personal situations when working and studying from home are also relevant due to the tutors' lack of expertise in online teaching, and the limitations of peer interaction. Together, these factors can make the experience of the online design studio more challenging.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was nationally representative of architecture students from various institutions. However, the study was limited to an exploration of students' opinions, and it did not include the points of view of tutors and decision-makers.

Originality/value

This research was conceived during the period of the COVID-19 lockdown, whilst both tutors and students were experiencing dramatic changes in their modes of teaching and learning due to the sudden move from on-campus design studios to a virtual alternative, with only the bare minimum of resources and relevant experience. Learners' perspectives can enhance understanding of online design studios to assess their quality and effectiveness.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 July 2021

Petra A. Robinson, Maja Stojanović, Zachary Z. Robinson and Renata Russo Lyons

This paper aims to explore the experiences of a high school senior, a doctoral student, a university professor and an online academic coach with a rapid, unplanned shift…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the experiences of a high school senior, a doctoral student, a university professor and an online academic coach with a rapid, unplanned shift to online learning in the USA during the COVID-19 pandemic to understand the challenges and distinct skills they identify as essential for success in a 100% virtual learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Through scholarly personal narratives (SPNs), the researchers shared details and authentic knowledge regarding their experiences and perceptions of successful teaching and learning in a 100% online learning environment.

Findings

The main goal was to identify necessary skills for success in a 100% virtual learning environment resulting from an unplanned shift. The findings show a need for learner and teacher self-directedness in developing a variety of nontraditional, critical literacies.

Originality/value

In light of the imposed and unplanned educational shifts in teaching and learning, this study has strong practical implications for human resource development offered through an analysis of multiple perspectives. This research may lead to a better understanding of how, in a period of rapid, unexpected shifts, individuals need to use self-directedness to leverage personal and professional development opportunities to adapt and succeed in the new environment. Additionally, the authors use an innovative critical theoretical framework to outline the skills the participants report as useful for success in an online classroom during a period of rapid, unexpected shifting.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Carol Jordan

Constructivism is a way of knowing where learners collaborate, reflect and use their own experiences to construct new knowledge. This paper aims to evaluate whether an…

Abstract

Purpose

Constructivism is a way of knowing where learners collaborate, reflect and use their own experiences to construct new knowledge. This paper aims to evaluate whether an open source Moodle e‐learning can deliver an instructional model using constructivist learning theories in an International Baccalaureate chemistry class.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature shows that students’ learning outcomes online are likely to be better when their actual learning environment closely matches their preferred or ideal learning environment. An online learning survey was administered to the students towards the end of their two‐year course and the Wilcoxon signed rank test used to measure the difference between the student's actual and preferred experiences with the online activities that used constructivist theories.

Findings

The findings showed that the activities provided by Moodle do foster a constructivist approach to learning and can provide students with the types of learning experiences they desire. However, their effectiveness is to a large extent dependent on the teacher's role in designing and directing the online learning experience. This is significant because it implies that for an online learning environment to be successful, a strong pedagogical strategy that emphasizes a constructivist approach needs to be consistently emphasized and practiced; having the technology tools available does not guarantee this.

Originality/value

This paper's findings show that constructivism as a learning theory can be translated into practice, and used to design and deliver online learning experiences that provide students with a style of learning they prefer. However, the extent to which this is successful depends on the teacher's role in designing and directing the online learning experience. This is significant because to be successful a strong instructional strategy shaped by the beliefs of the teacher emphasizing a constructivist approach needs to be consistently emphasized.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 56000