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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Yuan Gao

This paper aims to provide a theoretical overview of the factors influencing user trust in online games. It offers a set of guidelines that help online game marketers to…

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3871

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a theoretical overview of the factors influencing user trust in online games. It offers a set of guidelines that help online game marketers to better understand how users form their trust in online games, and fully reap the benefits of this new medium.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews literature from the perspectives of considering an online game player as both a consumer of web‐based entertainment and a computer user. It explores factors related to the web environment as well as those of the games themselves. In particular, it examines a user's perceptions about the company, the online gaming site, and an individual game.

Findings

A number of factors influencing user trust in online games are largely within the control of the company sponsoring the sites or marketing the games. Based on the analysis of these factors, this paper provides a set of guidelines that would help marketers win user trust in their online gaming products or services.

Practical implications

Firms promoting online games can take guidance in how to build user trust through paying attention to building brand recognition, enhancing usability and appeal, as well as providing security assurance both at the web sites and within the individual games.

Originality/value

This paper is based on current research in consumer trust, both offline and online, and represents an original attempt at analyzing theoretically the factors influencing user trust in online games. It provides a framework for empirical testing of the propositions outlined in the paper.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 27 October 2021

Thi Tuan Linh Pham, Han-Chung Huang, Fan-Chen Tseng, T.C.E. Cheng and Ching-I Teng

Flow, or total concentration with intrinsic enjoyment, has been recognized as being able to enhance online gamer loyalty. However, some gamers who experience flow do not…

Abstract

Purpose

Flow, or total concentration with intrinsic enjoyment, has been recognized as being able to enhance online gamer loyalty. However, some gamers who experience flow do not exhibit strong loyalty, posing the vital research question asking for whom flow would not enhance loyalty. Limited knowledge on this issue may lead game providers to assume that flow is influential in strengthening loyalty among all gamers, thus leading to suboptimal resource allocation and reduced effectiveness in retaining gamers. The purpose of the paper is to examine how gaming experience and gaming intensity moderate the impact of flow on online gamer loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

In the paper, the hypotheses were tested using responses from 273 gamers.

Findings

The findings show that flow and gaming experience positively impact gamer loyalty. Gaming experience reduces the positive relationship between flow and gamer loyalty. However, gaming intensity does not reduce.

Practical implications

Game providers should focus on creating a flow experience to strengthen the loyalty of gamers with short-gaming experience. However, game providers should devise other means to strengthen loyalty among gamers with long-gaming experience.

Originality/value

The study challenged the assumption of flow theory, i.e. that flow always determines loyalty. Instead, the paper offers a moderator – gaming experience – which sets a boundary condition for this theory. Flow works well only among gamers with relatively short-gaming experience. The study also extended the literature on gaming experience by uniquely indicating its attenuating effect on the relation between flow and loyalty.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2021

Wei-Lun Chang, Li-Ming Chen and Yen-Hao Hsieh

This research examined the social interactions of online game players based on the proposed motivation model in order to understand the transitions of motivation of online

Abstract

Purpose

This research examined the social interactions of online game players based on the proposed motivation model in order to understand the transitions of motivation of online game. The authors also separated samples into four categories to compare the difference of different type of online game players.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposed a motivation model for online game player based on existence–relatedness–growth theory. The authors also analyze the transitions of motivations via first-order and second-order Markov chain switching model to obtain the journey of online to offline socialization.

Findings

Teamwork–socialization players preferred to make friends in their online gaming network to socialize. Competition–socialization players were mostly students who played games to compete and socialize and may share experience in online or offline activities. Teamwork–mechanics players purely derived pleasure from gaming and were not motivated by other factors in their gaming activities. Competition–mechanics players may already have friends with other gamers in real life.

Research limitations/implications

More samples can be added to generate more generalizable findings and the proposed motivation model can be extended by other motivations related to online gaming behavior. The authors proposed a motivation model for online to offline socialization and separated online game players into four categories: teamwork–socialization, competition–socialization, teamwork–mechanics and competition–mechanics. The category of teamwork–socialization may contribute to online to offline socialization area. The category of competition–mechanics may add value to the area of traditional offline socialization. The categories of competition–socialization and teamwork–mechanics may help extant literature understand critical stimulus for online gaming behavior.

Practical implications

The authors’ findings can help online gaming industry understand the motivation journey of players through transition. Different types of online games may have various online game player's journey that can assist companies in improving the quality of online games. Online game companies can also offer official community to players for further interaction and experience exchange or the platform for offline activities in the physical environment.

Originality/value

This research proposed a novel motivation model to examine online to offline socializing behavior for online game research. The motivations in model were interconnected via the support of literature. The authors also integrated motivations by Markov chain switching model to obtain the transitions of motivational status. It is also the first attempt to analyze first-order and second-order Markov chain switching model for analysis. The authors’ research examined the interconnected relationships among motivations in addition to the influential factors to online gaming behavior from previous research. The results may contribute to extend the understanding of online to offline socialization in online gaming literature.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Book part
Publication date: 3 November 2014

Emma Hutchinson

To examine the potential for including forums in an online ethnography that draws on data from multiple online sites.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the potential for including forums in an online ethnography that draws on data from multiple online sites.

Methodology/approach

Taking a broadly post-structuralist approach to identity and embodiment online, the research drew on three sources of data: asynchronous email interviews, in-game participant observation and six months of forum observation.

Findings

The community in question was socially located around multiple field sites online and forums remain an integral part of the social lives of online gamers. The practice and ethics for examining forums from a qualitative perspective are outlined and how this can fit into an ethnographic account. Some of the data is then presented from this strand of the research to illustrate how researching a forum as a ‘lurker’ can complement theoretical trajectories and analyses from other parts of the dataset.

Originality

This research details a novel way of examining forums qualitatively as part of a larger dataset. Furthermore, the chapter posits how relatively unobtrusive methods of observation can bring to the fore the ways in which prejudice still structures online social interaction.

Details

Big Data? Qualitative Approaches to Digital Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-050-6

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2021

Gen-Yih Liao, Thi Tuan Linh Pham, Tzu-Ling Huang, T.C.E. Cheng and Ching-I Teng

Online games are prevalent internet applications and are known for satisfying the various needs of users. Nonetheless, little is known about whether online games could be…

Abstract

Purpose

Online games are prevalent internet applications and are known for satisfying the various needs of users. Nonetheless, little is known about whether online games could be a resort for users encountering workplace frustration. Explaining how workplace frustration and users' need satisfaction affect loyalty of online gamers, this study aims to formulate hypotheses and develop a framework based on the self-determination theory (SDT).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use an online survey to collect 848 responses and use structural equation modelling to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The authors find that workplace frustration, autonomy need satisfaction and competence need satisfaction are positively related to online gamer loyalty. Moreover, workplace frustration enhances the link between competence need satisfaction and online gamer loyalty.

Originality/value

The authors are the first to use SDT to identify the three antecedents and the moderator of online gamer loyalty. Our findings offer a key message that game providers could design effective means to retain their gamers by understanding their gamers' workplace frustration and informing them that playing games could alleviate the associated negative feelings.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 121 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Gen-Yih Liao, Tzu-Ling Huang, T.C.E. Cheng and Ching-I Teng

Relational cohesion theory posits that relational cohesion helps build relationships among communication partners, implying that users would expect a growth in relations…

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401

Abstract

Purpose

Relational cohesion theory posits that relational cohesion helps build relationships among communication partners, implying that users would expect a growth in relations or making more friends in the future. However, little is known about expectancy of a better future state of relations, i.e. expectancy of relational growth, and its impact on users' continued engagement in online communication. Our study extends relational cohesion theory to explain how expectancy of relational growth impacts online gamer loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

We test the framework using structural equation modeling to analyze a large sample of 1,429 responses from online gamers.

Findings

We find that expectancy of relational growth is positively related to norm compliance and relational cohesion, which are further related to network convergence and interdependence, fostering online gamer loyalty.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to relational cohesion theory by identifying novel sources of relational cohesion, i.e. expectancy of relational growth and norm compliance. Hence, game providers should create gamers' expectancy of growth in online relationships. Such expectancy could motivate continued gaming communication, even when gamers are not satisfied with the current state of online relationships. Moreover, we propose the new concept of expectancy of relational growth, which should have a strong impact on online communication in various areas.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2020

Daiane Scaraboto, Stefânia Ordovás de Almeida and João Pedro dos Santos Fleck

The purpose of this study is to explain how online brand communities work to support the denormalization of controversial (i.e. illegal yet normalized) gaming practices.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explain how online brand communities work to support the denormalization of controversial (i.e. illegal yet normalized) gaming practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study was characterized by long-term immersion in an online brand community for Brazilian Xbox gamers. The dataset includes online and offline interactions with community members, interviews, and online archival data.

Findings

This study shows how online brand community members promoted legal gaming in a market where piracy was prevalent. It demonstrates how community members worked to establish coherence; engaged in cognitive participation; developed collective action that extended beyond the community; and reflected on their own work.

Research limitations/implications

This study identifies online brand communities as a potential ally in combating controversial practices in online gaming; complements individual and behavioral approaches in explaining why consumers adopt controversial practices in online environments; and adds a normalization framework to the toolkit of Internet researchers.

Practical implications

This study identifies ways in which the potential of online brand communities can be leveraged to reduce consumer adherence to controversial gaming practices through denormalizing these and normalizing alternative practices that may be more desirable to companies and other stakeholders.

Originality/value

This long-term, qualitative study inspired by normalization process theory offers an innovative perspective on the online practices of consumers who engage with a brand in ways that create value for themselves and for the brand.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Ming‐Chi Lee

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether flow experience, perceived enjoyment, and interaction affect people's behavioural intention to play online games and…

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7371

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether flow experience, perceived enjoyment, and interaction affect people's behavioural intention to play online games and whether gender, age and prior experience have moderating effects on online game acceptance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study extends the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) with flow experience, perceived enjoyment, and interaction to propose a theoretical model to explain and predict people's behavioural intention to play online games. This model is examined through an empirical study involving 458 participants using structural equation modelling techniques. In addition, a competing model based on the technology acceptance model (TAM) is proposed to evaluate whether TPB is more suitable than TAM to explain the use of online games. The two action‐theoretical models are compared in terms of their predictive power and their practical utility.

Findings

Although both models explain the players' intention to play online games very well, the extended TPB model provides a better fit and explanatory power. Notably, this study finds that flow experience is a more important factor than perceived enjoyment in influencing customer acceptance of online games. Further analysis reveals that gender is a key moderator of online game acceptance.

Practical implications

Online game developers need to search for flow experience building strategies that might assist in engaging players. This study suggests that game developers should consider focusing more on establishing the interactions between players (social interaction) and online games (human‐computer interaction) in their marketing strategies.

Originality/value

This study is significant for two reasons. First, it synthesises the theory of planned behaviour with psychological and interaction factors and, second, it presents a blueprint for an entertainment‐oriented technology acceptance model.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Ying‐Chieh Chen, Patrick S. Chen, Jing‐Jang Hwang, Larry Korba, Ronggong Song and George Yee

To arouse the public awareness of online gaming‐related crimes and other societal influences so that these problems can be solved through education, laws and appropriate…

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5689

Abstract

Purpose

To arouse the public awareness of online gaming‐related crimes and other societal influences so that these problems can be solved through education, laws and appropriate technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 613 criminal cases of online gaming crimes that happened in Taiwan during 2002 were gathered and analyzed. They were analyzed for special features then focusing on the tendency for online gaming crime. Related prosecutions, offenders, victims, criminal methods, and so on, were analyzed.

Findings

According to our analysis of online gaming characteristics in Taiwan, the majority of online gaming crime is theft (73.7 percent) and fraud (20.2 percent). The crime scene is mainly in internet cafés (54.8 percent). Most crimes are committed within the 12:00 to 14:00 time period (11.9 percent). Identity theft (43.4 percent) and social engineering (43.9 percent) are the major criminal means. The offenders (95.8 percent) and victims (87.8 percent) are mainly male and offenders always proceed alone (88.3 percent). The age of offenders is quite low (63.3 percent in the age range of 15‐20), and 8.3 percent of offenders are under 15 years old. The offenders are mostly students (46.7 percent) and the unemployed (24 percent), most of them (81.9 percent) not having criminal records. The type of game giving rise to most of the criminal cases is Lineage Online (93.3 percent). The average value of the online gaming loss is about US$459 and 34.3 percent of criminal loss is between $100 and $300.

Research limitations/implications

These criminal cases were retrieved from Taiwan in 2002. Some criminal behavior may have been limited to a certain area or a certain period.

Practical implications

Provides a useful source of information and constructive advice for the public who will sense the seriousness and influence of online gaming crimes. Further, this topic may have implications on e‐commence, e‐services, or web‐based activities beyond gaming.

Originality/value

Since there is little published research in this area, this paper provides the public with a good and original introduction to a topic of growing importance.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Jianxin Jeff Yan and Hyun‐Jin Choi

The traditional target of computer game security is mainly copy protection. The emergence of online games fundamentally changes the security requirements for computer games

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4098

Abstract

The traditional target of computer game security is mainly copy protection. The emergence of online games fundamentally changes the security requirements for computer games. Although computer game development often utilizes cutting edge technology in computer graphics, artificial intelligence, human computer interaction and programming, game providers (developers or operators) do not pay much attention to security techniques. In this paper, we look into security failures that have happened or might happen in online games, and discuss some key security issues that have to concern online game providers. Specifically, we look into various kinds of online cheating, and introduce security techniques to deal with cheating prevention, though meanwhile other security issues are also discussed.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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