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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Juliet L. Hardesty

– This case study describes Indiana University Libraries' use of Omeka for online exhibits of digital collections.

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2247

Abstract

Purpose

This case study describes Indiana University Libraries' use of Omeka for online exhibits of digital collections.

Design/methodology/approach

Omeka is placed in the context of other online exhibit tools being used by galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (GLAM).

Findings

Omeka provides many benefits for different types of digital library collection exhibits and different levels of technical expertise but is currently limited in the ability to manage multiple exhibits of separate digital collections.

Originality/value

Describing Omeka in the context of other online exhibit tools shows the need for this kind of evaluation to improve these tools for the GLAM community.

Details

New Library World, vol. 115 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2010

S. Scott Nadler and John F. Kros

The purpose of this study is to empirically test the levels of trust supply chain managers exhibit regarding online auctions. The study seeks to test the hypotheses that…

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1168

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to empirically test the levels of trust supply chain managers exhibit regarding online auctions. The study seeks to test the hypotheses that supply chain managers with higher levels of trust in online auctions would exhibit more familiarity with online auctions, more positive relationships with suppliers, stronger focus on cost management, a stronger focus on revenue enhancement, and greater levels of participation.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the extant literature provided the basis for the development of an online pilot study that was e‐mailed to 100 supply chain managers. The results of the pilot study were used to develop an online survey instrument that was e‐mailed to 2,313 current members of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) and the Institute of Supply Management. A total of 213 usable questionnaires were returned, resulting in a 9.2 percent response rate.

Findings

The data were analyzed via t‐test, MANOVA and ANOVA. The study indicated that online auction users exhibit high levels of trust in online auctions. The study also found that those with higher levels of familiarity with online auctions, with stronger positive relationships with online auction suppliers, and with stronger focus on cost management also exhibited higher levels of trust in online auctions. Contrary to expectations study findings indicate that higher levels of perceived firm profitability and of online auction participation do not lead to increased levels of trust in online auctions.

Practical implications

The study provides a number of important implications. First, it is important for supply chain managers to recognize the important role that trust continues to play in business relationships. Supply chain managers are advised to be cognizant of the fact that some suppliers may be reluctant to participate in online auctions because they fear participation might damage customer relationships that they have spent years cultivating. Finally, supply chain managers are advised to consider the use of online auctions in order to achieve cost management objectives.

Originality/value

The research makes an important contribution to the literature because it seeks to assess supply chain managers' level of trust in online auctions and how this impacts on the extent to which they participate in this exchange mechanism. An equally important contribution provided by the research is that it focuses on the level of trust in online auctions in general, whereas the preponderance of past research has focused on reverse or price descending auctions only.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 110 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Nayantara Hensel

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the online auction mechanism in the USA is more effective at pricing initial public offerings (IPOs) than the traditional…

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1217

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the online auction mechanism in the USA is more effective at pricing initial public offerings (IPOs) than the traditional book building process.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis compares the performance of online auction IPOs with traditional IPOs issued in the same industry area and in the same year to assess the differences in first day mispricing and its persistence. The paper compares the characteristics of firms choosing the auction process relative to the traditional process. It also uses regression models to examine whether online auction IPOs had a significantly lower first day price increase than traditional IPOs.

Findings

The results indicate that for 60 percent of the auction IPOs, over 40 percent of the traditional IPOs issued in that year and in that three‐digit Standard Industry Classification (SIC) area had greater mispricing. The mispricing of online auction IPOs relative to traditional IPOs persist over time for 50‐80 percent of online auction IPOs. Regression analyses controlling for industry effects, year effects, size of the issue, and type of traditional underwriter (low, medium, and high volume underwriters) suggest that the auction's first day price surges are not significantly lower than those of traditional underwriters. Moreover, high volume traditional underwriters have statistically significantly higher first day price surges than low volume traditional underwriters, supporting the theory that they intentionally misprice to benefit their preferred clients. Firms choosing the auction process tend to be smaller in terms of the number of shares of their IPO and their annual sales than firms choosing the traditional IPO process. There is some overlap in industry sector and age, although this varies by year.

Originality/value

This paper suggests that the auction process may not be as efficient in pricing IPOs as was initially intended and that there are opportunities for further innovation and improvement.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2008

Diana Saiki and Audrey Robbins

The purpose of this research is to assess trends in information categories featured on costume and textile collection web sites, and to assess differences in the online

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to assess trends in information categories featured on costume and textile collection web sites, and to assess differences in the online capabilities of these features between 1997 and 2006.

Design/methodology/approach

The instrument was a content analysis of costume and textile collection web sites developed from a study completed in 1997. The previous study identified information categories which included hyperlinks to other sites, events calendars and forms to arrange visits, FAQs, online tours, and discussion group links. Information about education programs, contacting staff, volunteering, membership, and museum purchases was also noted. Data were collected from the 60 web sites used in the original study.

Findings

The findings revealed that costume and textile museums were using web sites to stimulate interest in visiting the physical museum. A picture of the artifact does not show all the specific features of an actual costume and textile, and thus the audience needs to actually visit the museum in order to learn about costume and textiles. A comparison of the 1997 and 2006 data revealed an increase in the frequency of features with higher levels of interaction capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

The research was limited to observing web sites and web site information categories documented in the original study.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the information categories that costume and textile museums find most useful to fulfill audience needs and describes trends in the use of information on web sites which can serve as a guideline in developing museum web sites.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Karel Cool, Matt Seitz, Jason Mestrits, Sona Bajaria and Uday Yadati

Although Google had a stellar performance in Web search, many of its other services, such as Google Video, were less successful. This case describes how YouTube came to…

Abstract

Although Google had a stellar performance in Web search, many of its other services, such as Google Video, were less successful. This case describes how YouTube came to dominate the video market for user-generated content (UGC), while Google Video tried various entry strategies and ultimately failed, ending with the acquisition of YouTube. It also reviews the various competitors in the UGC market, chronicles the entry of established and new players in the area of professionally generated content (PGC), and outlines the key challenges related to monetizing the acquisition of YouTube for Google.

The case discusses when and how to enter winner-take-all markets characterized by very strong network externalities. It focuses on the strategies of new entrants vs. those of incumbents in adjacent industries that seek to leverage their resources and skills. Further, it sheds light on how new industries are created, how convergence is changing competitive forces, how important it is to be a first or late mover in new markets, and how successful entrants may struggle to achieve profitability.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Chern Li Liew

This paper seeks to report findings from a study that looked at a range of strategic issues faced in the development, management and maintenance of online cultural…

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1920

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to report findings from a study that looked at a range of strategic issues faced in the development, management and maintenance of online cultural heritage exhibitions. The study examined exhibitions from different types of cultural agencies and asked questions about whether, for instance, the exhibitions are part of the strategic plan of the institutions, what their objectives are, how they are funded and a range of other management as well as technical issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A semi‐structured online survey questionnaire was administered to project managers and curators of such online exhibitions between July and December 2005.

Findings

A number of strategic management and technical issues related to the development and management of online exhibition projects have been identified in this study. It needs to be noted however, that the survey sample consists of far more museums than other types of memory institutions.

Research limitations/implications

The research concerned is by no means a comprehensive or an all‐inclusive survey of all relevant initiatives. It is meant to be an exploratory study of cultural heritage online exhibitions across different types of cultural and memory institutions available on the web.

Originality/value

The findings from this study provide a snapshot of key strategic issues faced by those involved in the development, management and maintenance of online cultural heritage exhibitions. The paper aims to highlight key issues, offers challenges and invites further discussion and innovation in this area.

Details

Program, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Julie Hennessy and Andrei Najjar

Focuses on Apple Computer's launch of iTunes and iPod as a way to give Wintel users a relationship with Apple. Deals with issues of brand equity, corporate and brand goal…

Abstract

Focuses on Apple Computer's launch of iTunes and iPod as a way to give Wintel users a relationship with Apple. Deals with issues of brand equity, corporate and brand goal setting, target selection, and matching product and service characteristics with goals and targets. Also allows for a discussion of channel partners, their interests, and their impact on the likely success or failure of a strategy.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Saeed Shobeiri, Ebrahim Mazaheri and Michel Laroche

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how an E-retailer's assistive intent impacts the perceptions and behaviours of online shoppers. The paper introduces a model…

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1042

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how an E-retailer's assistive intent impacts the perceptions and behaviours of online shoppers. The paper introduces a model that explains and examines the process through which the perceived assistive intent of an E-retailer leads to improved patronage intentions towards the web site.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey on the most recent e-purchase experiences of more than 600 individuals in North America was conducted. Structural equation modelling based on EQS 6.1 was used to assess the measurement and structural models.

Findings

Results indicated that customers’ impressions of an E-retailer's assistive intent positively impact web site patronage intentions both directly and indirectly through two key constructs of e-shopping, including web site involvement and web site attitudes.

Research limitations/implications

The student sample is not representative of the population. Students are familiar with internet and feel less need for assistance online. Another shortcoming might be its settings. Since the survey was on the respondents’ most recent online experiences, the data quality depends on the amount and accuracy of the information they could retrieve from memory.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that E-retailers would highly benefit from investing in the development of an assistive image. To do so, E-retailers should leverage the interactive nature of the web and provide supportive tools that facilitate the e-shopping task of clients.

Social implications

Developing impressions of the site's assistive intent is highly rewarding for E-retailers that are new to the business.

Originality/value

This paper represents the first effort to link the newly developed construct of E-retailer's assistive intent to two fundamental variables of online shopping, including web site involvement and web site attitudes. This work would also be an extension of the past studies that call for further investigation of the link between customer orientation and customer's loyalty intentions.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Robert D. Carlitz and Mario Zinga

Common knowledge: Pittsburgh is a school networking project which is developing network connectivity and curricular applications in the Pittsburgh Public Schools. With its…

Abstract

Common knowledge: Pittsburgh is a school networking project which is developing network connectivity and curricular applications in the Pittsburgh Public Schools. With its emphasis on the curriculum and its efforts to institutionalize the use of networking technology, the project offers a useful model for other school districts to follow. The present paper describes how the project has expanded from its initial structure, delineates specific products that have been produced and indicates directions in which future expansion is likely to take place.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Emily Marsh

This paper describes how the content management system (CMS) Omeka supports the representation and presentation of the National Agricultural Library’s (NAL’s) digital…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes how the content management system (CMS) Omeka supports the representation and presentation of the National Agricultural Library’s (NAL’s) digital exhibits, including some observations on its strengths and weaknesses. It also looks at Omeka’s major features through a theoretical lens of exhibit orientation that provides another way to assess it as a digital content tool.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study method was selected to review four comparable exhibits from the same institution. The Omeka software was evaluated through a lens of exhibit design that includes two orientations (object vs information) and multiple goals (object identification and display, engagement, interpretation and education).

Findings

Omeka is a valuable tool for digital exhibits because of its strength in knowledge representation through a standard metadata scheme, the ability to group items that have some aspect in common such as author or topic, and its support of narrative exhibits incorporating text and images. Omeka needs some additional support, however, to fulfill more complex goals such as user engagement, object interpretation and user education.

Originality/value

The paper grounds the examination of Omeka within a theoretical framework of exhibit orientation that enriches its observations and conclusions.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

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