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Article
Publication date: 10 March 2014

Maria Knoll and Jenny Bronstein

The study aimed to investigate the information disclosure behavior of women bloggers who suffer from infertility by examining their self-disclosure as it relates to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aimed to investigate the information disclosure behavior of women bloggers who suffer from infertility by examining their self-disclosure as it relates to the anonymity patterns they adopted.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was distributed to approximately 300 authors of infertility blogs, 135 bloggers answered the request to take part in the study. The survey gathered basic demographic and blogging practice data, and measured different elements of the bloggers' discursive and visual anonymity as well as their patters of self-disclosure.

Findings

Findings reveal that the majority of respondents identify themselves on their blogs and only a small percentage decided to be totally anonymous, and about half of the bloggers post actual photos of themselves and their lives. The participants reported a high rate of self-disclosure, revealing sensitive information, letting their defenses down, disclosing highly intimate details about their lives, writing openly about their infertility treatments on their blog. No significant correlation was observed between visual and discursive anonymity and the perceived self-disclosure of participants. Results show that the more anonymous the bloggers are, the more afraid they become that their blog may be read by people they know offline. On the other hand, the more identifiable the bloggers are, the more willingness they show to share the content of their journal with people they know offline. The majority of participants expressed concerns that blogging could negatively impact their lives.

Originality/value

This study explores an alternate explanation through the examination of the bloggers' self-disclosure patterns as they relate to the degree of anonymity adopted.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 66 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Susan C. Herring, Lois Ann Scheidt, Elijah Wright and Sabrina Bonus

Aims to describe systematically the characteristics of weblogs (blogs) – frequently modified web pages in which dated entries are listed in reverse chronological sequence…

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to describe systematically the characteristics of weblogs (blogs) – frequently modified web pages in which dated entries are listed in reverse chronological sequence and which are the latest genre of internet communication to attain widespread popularity.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the results of a quantitative content analysis of 203 randomly selected blogs, comparing the empirically observable features of the corpus with popular claims about the nature of blogs, and finding them to differ in a number of respects.

Findings

Notably, blog authors, journalists and scholars alike exaggerate the extent to which blogs are interlinked, interactive, and oriented towards external events, and underestimate the importance of blogs as individualistic, intimate forms of self‐expression.

Originality/value

Based on the profile generated by the empirical analysis, considers the likely antecedents of the blog genre, situates it with respect to the dominant forms of digital communication on the internet today, and suggests possible developments of the use of blogs over time in response to changes in user behavior, technology, and the broader ecology of internet genres.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Henna Syrjälä and Anu Norrgrann

Purpose: This chapter examines two rather extreme examples of non-human entities in home assemblage, interior objects, and companion animals, and how their agency appears

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter examines two rather extreme examples of non-human entities in home assemblage, interior objects, and companion animals, and how their agency appears distributed with human consumers in assembling home. The authors aim at drawing conceptual contrasts and overlappings in how agency expresses itself in these categories of living and non-living entities, highlighting the multifaceted manifestations of object agency.

Methodology/Approach: This chapter employs multiple sets of ethnographically inspired data, ranging from ethnographic interviews and an autoethnographic diary to three types of (auto-)netnographic data.

Findings: The findings showcase oscillation of agency between these three analytic categories (human, non-human living, and non-human non-living), focusing on how it is distributed between two of the entities at a time, within the heterogeneous assemblage of home. Furthermore, the findings show instances in which agency emerges as shared between all three entities.

Originality/Value: The contribution of this chapter comes from advancing existing discussion on object agency toward the focus on distributed and shared agency. The research adds to the prevailing discussion by exhibiting how agency oscillates between different types of interacting entities in the assemblage, and in particular, how the two types of non-human entities are agentic. The research demonstrates the variability and interwovenness of non-human and human, living and non-living agency as they appear intertwined in home assemblage.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-285-3

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2018

Zaid Alrawadieh, Mithat Zeki Dincer, Fusun Istanbullu Dincer and Parvin Mammadova

Travelers’ narratives disseminated online about destination experiences are an important source of information for measuring the performance of tourist destinations and…

Abstract

Purpose

Travelers’ narratives disseminated online about destination experiences are an important source of information for measuring the performance of tourist destinations and understanding travelers’ perceptions, behaviors and expectations. Drawing on data from travel narratives, the purpose of this study is to examine the destination image of Istanbul as revealed in Western travel blogs. In addition, this study aims to identify the demographic characteristics of travelers who are more likely to engage in destination blogging activities.

Design methodology/approach

A deductive content analysis approach was used on a sample of travel blog entries retrieved from TravelPod.com. Based on the dimensions and attributes of destination image identified by Beerli and Martín (2004), a coding scheme was established to guide the coding process.

Findings

The findings suggest that the online destination image of Istanbul is generally positive. Specifically, the destination is mainly appreciated for its cultural and historical heritage, as well as for its tourist infrastructure. However, the findings also highlight some issues that concern Western travelers, such as safety and traffic congestion.

Originality/value

This study is timely as it explores the online destination image of a key destination in a period of instability. The findings are expected to offer insights for destination management organizations in Turkey on how Western travelers view Istanbul as a tourist destination. These insights are also important to help policymakers and tourism destination marketers design effective strategies.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Lynn Tatum Kleinveldt and Mbali Zulu

The purpose of this study is to highlight the techniques and applications used to adapt information literacy (IL) modules in such a way that students acquired the IL…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to highlight the techniques and applications used to adapt information literacy (IL) modules in such a way that students acquired the IL skills through the use of tablet technology. The focus at higher education institutions has been placed on embracing the ever-changing Web technologies to enhance teaching and learning. This case study reports on a collaborative effort between faculty and librarians in 2014, where tablet technology was integrated into the Information Literacy Certificate Programme of Environmental Management Extended Curriculum Programme (ECP) students.

Design/methodology/approach

To support teaching with technology at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT), a pilot project was conducted in 2014 using tablet technology to train IL to a group of 20 ECP Environmental Management students in the Applied Sciences Faculty. All modules were adapted for this purpose meaning that students used the tablet throughout the training sessions.

Findings

Good collaboration between librarians and faculty, as well as interaction between students increased. Some of the challenges faced were unstable internet connection; many Web applications identified by the trainers to use during the training were not compatible with the Nexus 7 Tablet. Overall, the training went well. In the end, the librarians were successful in achieving learning to take place among students.

Originality/value

Currently CPUT Libraries promotes the Information Literacy (IL) Certificate Programme to first year students, integrating IL into the curriculum of faculty. It is hoped that this paper will give insight for academic librarians wishing to incorporate mobile technologies into their IL training programmes.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Riikka Harikkala-Laihinen

Purpose: This chapter explores how organizations can influence the emotional climate surrounding change, and thereby encourage the emergence of positive rather than…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter explores how organizations can influence the emotional climate surrounding change, and thereby encourage the emergence of positive rather than negative emotions. Despite growing literature, many companies struggle with postacquisition integration. In the last 3 decades, the discussion has turned toward how employees' emotions complicate the process. This chapter discusses those emotions, paying special attention to the emotional climate surrounding change. The focus is on examining how an organization's emotional climate influences employees' emotions following an acquisition.

Design/methodology/approach: The chapter takes the acquired company point of view, following a German–Finnish deal completed in January 2017 over 1 year. Data were collected through interviews (totaling 26), daily memo-like diaries (65 entries), and an employee satisfaction survey (56 respondents).

Findings: The findings reveal that employees are likely to have emotional reactions even when relatively little integration is intended. In addition, the surrounding emotional climate – whether positive or negative – is likely to trigger similarly valenced emotions. The theoretical contribution of this chapter lies in the introduction of emotional climate rather than organizational culture as a key factor for employees during the early integration period.

Practical implication: Particularly line managers have an important role in maintaining positivity. For positivity to dominate, organizations need to make the benefits of the deal and the future of the company clear to the employees.

Details

Emotions and Service in the Digital Age
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-260-2

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Wontae Choi

This paper seeks to provide an overview of industrial information programs in Korea and to describe the databases, service contexts, document supply services and issues in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide an overview of industrial information programs in Korea and to describe the databases, service contexts, document supply services and issues in the field.

Design/methodology/approach

Presents the current status, practical issues and vision for the development and access to industrial information programs. Focuses on the external drivers of change and the strategic issues, in particular for industrial information and document supply services.

Findings

Recognizes the problem of access, the need for a long‐term strategy and cooperation, an effective document supply service and makes proposals for the future of industrial information programs in Korea.

Originality/value

Offers a practical source of information and issues. Advises any organization to design an extensible, collaborative and integrated industrial information program.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Paul Infield

Abstract

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Jackie Rodgers

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2012

Patrick Blessinger and Charles Wankel

This chapter provides a broad overview of the practical applications of three technology-based teaching and learning tool: wikis, blogs, and WebQuests. These Web-based…

Abstract

This chapter provides a broad overview of the practical applications of three technology-based teaching and learning tool: wikis, blogs, and WebQuests. These Web-based communication tools allow teachers and students to increase student engagement by enhancing experiential type learning. A variety of studies is presented to demonstrate how these three types of collaborative technologies can be used as inquiry-based and reflection-based active learning tools to foster higher levels of effort and participation by students. This chapter presents a variety of perspectives about how to make the learning process for both instructors and teachers more engaging, more gratifying, and more personally meaningful. In doing so, these technologies serve as enabling technologies by promising new ways to increase academic engagement and motivation. The ultimate goal in using these technologies is to develop students as lifelong learners and to foster a high value for learning and the development of higher order thinking skills that grows over time. The experiential nature and authenticity of the activities that these technologies can be used for helps achieve this purpose. Of course, technology involves a constant evolution and new technologies will always appear in the future but this does not mean that they should be viewed as passing fads or not worthy of implementing. These tools can be viewed as opportunities to expand our definition and concept of teaching and learning in the modern, post-industrial era. To that end, this chapter explores the innovative use of these technological tools to better engage students and enhance the learning process.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Online Learning Activities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-236-3

Keywords

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