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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Robert Detmering, Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles, Samantha McClellan and Rosalinda Hernandez Linares

This paper aims to provide an introductory overview and selected annotated bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy across all…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an introductory overview and selected annotated bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy across all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

It introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2014.

Findings

It provides information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Charles Krusekopf

Two of the most important trends in higher education have been the emergence of online learning and efforts to internationalise the curriculum and student body. While most…

Abstract

Two of the most important trends in higher education have been the emergence of online learning and efforts to internationalise the curriculum and student body. While most universities embraced both these trends, insufficient attention has been paid to how the two approaches might be mutually supportive. Online education offers the opportunity to bring together students living in different countries in common courses and programmes, but cross-border enrolments remain low and new models and approaches are needed to build educational offerings that bring students and faculty from different countries together in sustained educational engagement online. This paper highlights a case study of an innovative blended double degree business masters’ program between Royal Roads University (RRU) in Canada and the Management Center Innsbruck (MCI) in Austria that allows mid-career, blended learning students to build international competencies and networks while continuing to work full-time. Through this double degree program, students can complete a Master of Global Management (MGM) at RRU and an MBA at MCI in approximately 24 months. Mid-career students have traditionally had limited opportunities to participate in an international education due to work and family constraints, but the pairing of two blended programmes creates an opportunity for these students to engage in a rich cross-cultural learning community. The paper highlights the challenges of integrating online learning into internationalisation strategies and explains how double degree programmes such as the RRU-MCI collaboration provide advantages that help overcome the challenges associated with online programmes that enrol students from different countries.

Details

The Disruptive Power of Online Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-326-3

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Carol Kilmon and Mary Helen Fagan

The purpose of this study is to explore the adoption of course management software (CMS) among faculty in a nursing program in order to better understand the consequences…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the adoption of course management software (CMS) among faculty in a nursing program in order to better understand the consequences that result from adoption decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was taken using a component of diffusion of innovations theory as a framework for exploring the research questions.

Findings

Diffusion of innovations theory suggests there are three dimensions of consequences that should be analyzed: desirable versus undesirable consequences; direct versus indirect consequences; and anticipated versus unanticipated consequences. Consistent with Roger's theory, direct and anticipated consequences of adoption of a CMS by faculty went together. In addition, the research findings were consistent with Roger's theory in that it was difficult to separate desirable from undesirable consequences resulting from the innovation of course management system adoption.

Originality/value

The results of this research support Roger's theory while raising a number of new questions. A problem was identified with the classification of desirable versus undesirable consequences. Further research is recommended to clarify these consequences categories, while taking into account the perspectives of people who have different roles during the change process. This study only included faculty using the course management system. Additional research should focus upon the consequences of CMS use for students.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2019

Marie-Line Germain

Abstract

Details

Integrating Service-Learning and Consulting in Distance Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-412-5

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Amanda E. Major, S. Raj Chaudhury, Betsy M. Gilbertson and David T. King Jr

The purpose of this paper is to understand the lived experiences from the voice of the authors (a science professor, an instructional designer, a distance learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the lived experiences from the voice of the authors (a science professor, an instructional designer, a distance learning doctoral intern, and a distance learning director) in the process of transitioning a face-to-face science course to online modality at a large, research university.

Design/methodology/approach

The method of this qualitative inquiry involves a personal narrative approach in which the authors reflect on their experiences of this process and analyze it through writing.

Findings

The findings examine the challenges of moving a traditional course online and reiterate the value of a team approach to ensure its quality. The narrative offers clarity to the different phases of such a project and can enhance decision making among those involved in course design and delivery, as well as administrators incentivizing the conversion of traditional courses to the online modality.

Practical implications

Online education has emerged as a viable solution. The challenges and rewards of transitioning face-to-face courses to distance learning modalities are well documented, even for a senior science educator.

Social implications

Universities face several modern day challenges, including reductions in state appropriations, lack of available space for classes, challenges of engaging a technologically savvy generation, and preparing students for a global marketplace.

Originality/value

To support faculty members’ transition to online education, universities offer instructional design support, where ideas are exchanged with faculty members to ensure pedagogically sound and engaging distance learning. The authors conclude with recommendations for both practice and future research in the area of practice and process improvement for diffusion of online courses at traditional universities, one course at a time. This is important to those beginning to transition course offerings online.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Margaret Lindorff and Tui McKeown

This paper aims to be a response to the “Call for Papers” on challenges for the practice of, and new modes of questioning and delivery in, business education. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to be a response to the “Call for Papers” on challenges for the practice of, and new modes of questioning and delivery in, business education. The authors seek to do this through an investigation of the disadvantages and benefits associated with the move towards using online technologies in an on‐campus undergraduate first year management subject.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a survey of 362 first year students undertaking a blended learning course in management.

Findings

Students prefer interactive tutorials over lectures or online material they can access themselves as needed. They also mainly access the online material they believe will be most useful in achieving higher grades, and prefer online material that is related to assessment outcomes, rather than that designed for greater understanding.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that the community of inquiry framework, although designed to evaluate online learning, can also be used to frame the comparative utility of online and other teaching strategies. The paper also explores issues related to the Technology Acceptance Model's prediction that ease of use of online learning resources is important, and finds that many students are restricted by the cost of downloading and printing online learning material in university libraries and laboratories.

Originality/value

The research focuses upon first year management students, and transition implications of the findings are discussed.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Robert Whittaker

The aim of this paper is to describe the rapid development and effectiveness of online education in an urban college, emphasizing the use of distance education by local

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to describe the rapid development and effectiveness of online education in an urban college, emphasizing the use of distance education by local students, their academic performance and perspectives for future growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a description of the phases of distance education development. It analyzes of survey data on student response to online learning and analysis of grades indicating academic performance online in relation to overall undergraduate performance.

Findings

The paper finds that early unplanned development has brought increased administrative support: plans are being made for programs, major concentrations, and advanced degrees on the undergraduate and graduate level. Student academic success reflects the special demands of online education and indicates the need for special screening processes and support services.

Research implications

The academic success of students reflects the special demands of distance learning and qualifies the popularity of distance education as seen in rapid increases in online enrollment.

Practical implications

The promise of distance education for a local student population (to speed progress to degree completion by increasing the number of courses per semester) should be tested in terms of student academic success.

Originality/value

This account of how distance learning can develop in an urban, commuter college and the possibilities for improving service to existing students while increasing enrollment, suggests strategies for effective integration of online courses into the existing undergraduate and graduate curriculum.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2013

Course redesign is a creative process that involves the four sets of considerations set out by the DIME model. In this chapter, we highlight key considerations related to…

Abstract

Course redesign is a creative process that involves the four sets of considerations set out by the DIME model. In this chapter, we highlight key considerations related to design, interaction, media, and evaluation and describe the interconnections of the decisions within the model that make the process iterative. In addition, we suggest supplementary matters for your consideration. Specifically, we explore matters related to career and course management. Career considerations are strategic level concerns related to course redesign that have potentially long-term implications. Course management considerations are tactical level suggestions aimed at making your course implementation a success. Issues and suggestions are grounded in experience.

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2015

James M. Kohlmeyer, Larry P. Seese and Terry Sincich

Examine hiring preferences of nonpublic accounting professionals when selecting candidates with online versus traditional face-to-face (FTF) accounting degrees.

Abstract

Purpose

Examine hiring preferences of nonpublic accounting professionals when selecting candidates with online versus traditional face-to-face (FTF) accounting degrees.

Methodology/approach

Surveys.

Findings

Consistent with Kohlmeyer, Seese, and Sincich (2011), this study revealed that accounting professionals, in general, indicated a strong preference to hire students with a FTF accounting degree as compared to a candidate with an online (OL) accounting degree. However, there were two significant departures from the results of Kohlmeyer et al. (2011). AACSB accreditation did help mitigate the respondents’ reluctance to hire students with OL degrees. In addition, nonpublic accounting professionals were neutral as to whether they would hire someone with an online accounting degree in the next three years. Public accounting professionals opposed hiring someone with an online accounting degree in the next three years (Kohlmeyer et al., 2011).

Practical implications

Online programs are going to have to be more proactive in persuading accounting professionals that an online and FTF accounting degree are equally desirable for hiring purposes.

Social implications

Students need to be aware of accounting professionals’ hiring concerns in regard to candidates with online accounting degrees.

Originality/value

Little research has examined the hiring preferences of accounting professionals in selecting candidates with either an online or FTF accounting degree.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-646-1

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Book part
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Ann Boyd Davis, Richard Rand and Robert Seay

As more students take online courses as part of their college curricula, the integrity of testing in an online environment becomes increasingly important. The potential…

Abstract

Purpose

As more students take online courses as part of their college curricula, the integrity of testing in an online environment becomes increasingly important. The potential for cheating on exams is generally considered to be higher in an online environment. One approach to compensate for the absence of a physical proctor is to use a remote proctoring service that electronically monitors the student during the examination period.

Methodology/approach

We examined the exam grades for 261 students taking two different upper division accounting courses to determine if a computer-based remote proctoring service reduced the likelihood of cheating, measured through lower exam scores, as compared to classroom proctoring and no proctoring. We examined both online and on-campus courses.

Findings

In qualitative and quantitative accounting courses, evidence shows that grades were significantly lower for students who were proctored using a remote proctoring service compared to students who were not proctored. In the quantitative course, remote proctoring resulted in significantly lower final exam scores than either classroom or no proctoring. However, in the qualitative course, both remote proctoring online and live proctoring in a classroom resulted in significantly lower final exam scores than no proctoring, and they are not statistically different from each other.

Originality/value

Academics and administrators should find these results helpful. The results suggest that the use of proctoring services in online courses has the potential to enhance the integrity of online courses by reducing the opportunities for academic dishonesty during exams.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-767-7

Keywords

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