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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Muhammad Aljukhadar and Sylvain Senecal

The internet has become mainstream in everyday communications and transactions. This research aims to provide a segmentation analysis for the online market based on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The internet has become mainstream in everyday communications and transactions. This research aims to provide a segmentation analysis for the online market based on the various uses of the internet.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the online consumer segmentation literature is first conducted. Survey method and cluster analysis techniques are used in the empirical study. A sample of 407 participants that belonged to a large consumer panel adequately responded to an online survey and provided their pattern of internet use, internet experience, and psychological characteristics.

Findings

The analysis shows that the online consumers form three global segments: the basic communicators (consumers that use the internet mainly to communicate via e‐mail), the lurking shoppers (consumers that employ the internet to navigate and to heavily shop), and the social thrivers (consumers that exploit more the internet interactive features to socially interact by means of chatting, blogging, video streaming, and downloading). Subsequent χ2 and ANOVA tests illustrate that consumers from these segments exhibit significantly divergent demographic and experience profiles.

Research limitations/implications

The results indicate that online consumers differ according to their pattern of internet use. The results have external and ecological validity; however, they lack the control provided in a laboratory experiment. Future research should examine if the findings can be replicated using behavioral measures.

Practical implications

Practitioners that plan to follow a resource‐based approach should consider the distinctive characteristics of the online market segments for an optimal allocation of marketing expenditure. Marketing and advertising strategies can be developed according to the customer's online segment. Further, online marketers can use the demographic and experience profiles to predict their customer's segment.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to perform a segmentation analysis to the online consumer market according to internet use pattern. The results show that usage can reliably be used as a segmentation base. Managerial and theoretical implications are furnished.

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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Delia Vazquez, Jenny Cheung, Bang Nguyen, Charles Dennis and Anthony Kent

The purpose of this study is to analyse online consumers' experiential responses towards visual user-generated content in social commerce fashion online shopping…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyse online consumers' experiential responses towards visual user-generated content in social commerce fashion online shopping environments. The study develops and tests a UGC OCE framework incorporating aesthetic and relational experiential paths in the OCE.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a quantitative approach to examine fashion consumers experiential responses to UGC content. The sample comprised 555 respondents recruited via a consumer panel. SEM analysis was employed to analyse and test the framework model.

Findings

The findings illustrate that consumers are initially stimulated by an aesthetic experience, which then triggers a combination of relational, emotional and interactive experiences in fashion social commerce. The study extends the S-O-R framework by integrating it to the experiential “path” that indicates the series of experiences consumers encounter. Using S-O-R, the study presents the consumers' online experiential responses to viewing visual UGC, revealing that there are five experiential responses, all of which have an influence on online consumer behaviour. Responses towards visual UGC include visual, relational, emotional, cognitive engagement and interactive engagement, which were all identified to influence purchase intention.

Originality/value

This study is original in finding that, in the context of online fashion shopping, aesthetics drive relational experiences, and relational experiences drive flow and interactive behaviour and also purchase intention. Aesthetic experiences and positive emotions are powerful drivers of purchase intention and drive connectedness, flow and interactive behaviour. This study extends the literature by extending the frameworks in OCE and CE into the fashion UGC context.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Joel R. Evans and Anil Mathur

The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed and critical look at the evolution of online survey research since Evans and Mathur’s (2005) article on the value of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed and critical look at the evolution of online survey research since Evans and Mathur’s (2005) article on the value of online surveys. At that time, online survey research was in its early stages. Also covered are the present and future states of online research. Many conclusions and recommendations are presented.

Design/methodology/approach

The look back focuses on online surveys, strengths and weaknesses of online surveys, the literature on several aspects of online surveys and online survey best practices. The look ahead focuses on emerging survey technologies and methodologies, and new non-survey technologies and methodologies. Conclusions and recommendations are provided.

Findings

Online survey research is used more frequently and better accepted by researchers than in 2005. Yet, survey techniques are still regularly transformed by new technologies. Non-survey digital research is also more prominent than in 2005 and can better track actual behavior than surveys can. Hybrid surveys will be widespread in the future.

Practical implications

The paper aims to provide insights for researchers with different levels of online survey experience. And both academics and practitioners should gain insights.

Social implications

Adhering to a strong ethics code is vital to gain respondents’ trust and to produce valid results.

Originality/value

Conclusions and recommendations are offered in these specific areas: defining concepts, understanding the future role of surveys, developing and implementing surveys and a survey code of ethics. The literature review cites more than 200 sources.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Min‐Young Lee, Youn‐Kyung Kim and Hyun‐Joo Lee

Online auctions have attracted emotional shoppers through exciting shopping processes such as searching and bidding. The recreational and emotional worth of online auction…

Abstract

Purpose

Online auctions have attracted emotional shoppers through exciting shopping processes such as searching and bidding. The recreational and emotional worth of online auction shopping forces auction retailers to develop tailored strategies for their consumers. To this end, this study aimed to classify online auction shoppers based on their emotional shopping motivations and examine the relations of demographics (i.e. age, gender, income, and education) and psychographics (i.e. impulsiveness, variety‐seeking tendency, price sensitivity, and risk‐consciousness) to online auction shopper groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected via an online questionnaire utilizing a pre‐recruited consumer panel that had experience of online auction shopping during the past 12 months. Existing measurement scales were adopted and tested for validity and reliability in the processes of academic expert review, expert debriefing, the pretest, and the main study. The measures consisted of consumer psychographics (i.e. impulsiveness, variety seeking, price consciousness, and risk consciousness), emotional shopping motivations (i.e. adventure and gratification), and demographic variables. The analyses of the study proceeded in two stages. First, a cluster analysis uncovered auction shopper segments that emerged from the two dimensions of emotional shopping motivation. Second, regression analyses determined the predictive powers of demographic and psychographic variables in discriminating auction shopper segments.

Findings

The findings suggested that there were distinct auction shopper segments based on adventure and gratification shopping motivations. Four cluster groups showed significant differences in demographic characteristics of age and gender, and psychographic characteristics of impulsiveness, variety‐seeking tendency, and price sensitivity. The regression results provided information on predictive powers of selected variables (i.e. age, gender, impulsiveness, variety‐seeking tendency, price sensitivity, and risk consciousness) for different segments.

Originality/value

This study identified four online auction shopper segments and their differences in demographic and psychographic characteristics.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Danita van Heerden and Melanie Wiese

The purpose of this paper is to explore consumers’ motivations for engaging in Facebook brand communities, and what outcomes brands can gain from online engagement.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore consumers’ motivations for engaging in Facebook brand communities, and what outcomes brands can gain from online engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

An online consumer panel was used to collect data through convenience sampling; 497 useable questionnaires were collected.

Findings

The results of the structural equation modelling show that hedonic motivations are more prevalent in Facebook brand communities than utilitarian motivations. When considering the outcomes of online engagement, loyalty towards the brand community is the strongest outcome, followed by word-of-mouth and purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

This research indicates that marketers should focus on creating content on Facebook brand communities that appeals to the hedonic needs of consumers, such as brand likeability, entertainment and interpersonal utility. This type of content will motivate members of these brand communities to engage online. When consumers engage online, it creates benefits for the brand such as loyalty, word-of-mouth and purchase intention.

Originality/value

This study presents a framework for investigating consumers’ motivation to engage online, based on a theoretical underpinning of both sense of community theory and uses and gratification theory. It also identifies three outcomes for brands that explain why it is worthwhile for firms to invest in engaging with consumers in Facebook brand communities while including a wide range of brand communities.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Kenneth C. Gehrt, Mahesh N. Rajan, G. Shainesh, David Czerwinski and Matthew O'Brien

This study aims to explore Indian online shopping via the concept of shopping orientations.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore Indian online shopping via the concept of shopping orientations.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were collected from 536 consumer panel members. Online shopping segments were identified by using a two‐step process that clustered respondents in terms of the similarity of their scores across four shopping orientations.

Findings

Three segments were identified: value singularity, quality at any price, and reputation/recreation. The quality at any price and reputation/recreation segments were the predominant online shoppers. Although their orientations toward shopping differed, their behaviour, web site attribute ratings, and demographics were very similar except for occupation (managerial versus clerical, respectively). The finding that the value singularity segment is not the pioneer online shopper in India contrasts with the early online shoppers in the USA, who were often motivated by price.

Research limitations/implications

This is the first empirical study to use shopping orientation research in the Indian marketplace. It is also among the first to link shopping orientations with a wide complement of correlates. Research should continue to track the development of this emerging market.

Practical implications

Besides revealing that the orientations of Indian consumers are not price‐based, the relatively unfractionated factor analysis solutions for shopping orientations and web site dimensionality suggest that, in the emerging Indian economy, consumer conceptualizations of shopping have not yet undergone full elaboration. Thus, this cross‐sectional study could be extended with longitudinal research to reveal how Indian consumers' perceptions of the marketplace change with market development and growing consumer sophistication.

Originality/value

Although online shopping in India is on the verge of rapid growth, relatively little is known about most aspects of Indian consumer behaviour. This study begins to build a foundation of knowledge of Indian online shopping.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Chanaka Jayawardhena and Len Tiu Wright

This paper seeks to examine the antecedents of online shopper excitement, its consequences for behavioural intentions as expressed by intent to return, and positive…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the antecedents of online shopper excitement, its consequences for behavioural intentions as expressed by intent to return, and positive word‐of‐mouth communication.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model is developed based on the literature. Instrument item scales to measure all constructs in the model were as informed by the literature and adapted from prior studies. An online structured questionnaire survey was sent by e‐mail to a UK consumer panel (n=626). The results were analysed using LISREL 8.7.

Findings

Convenience, involvement, attributes of the web site and merchandising all collectively influence shopper excitement. The attributes of the web site and merchandising directly influence intent to return. E‐shopper excitement leads to positive word‐of‐mouth (WOM) and increases the intent to return.

Research limitations/implications

The study may be limited in that no differentiation is made between the types of goods that e‐consumers purchased. A future extension of this work could be to investigate how the study can be applied to various products, including experience goods such as entertainment.

Practical implications

It is shown that shopping excitement can increase intent to return and positive WOM. Understanding online shopper excitement can explain some of the reasons why consumers shop online, which in turn can help e‐tailers improve their offerings to their consumers.

Originality/value

The study presents a comprehensive model of online shopper excitement. This is the first study to validate such a model empirically, and therefore the study adds to the understanding of the antecedents and consequences of consumer excitement in the online shopping environment.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 43 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2010

JungKun Park and Richard Feinberg

The paper aims to explore the structure of both normative and informational consumer conformity in an online virtual community. The purpose of this paper is to develop and…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore the structure of both normative and informational consumer conformity in an online virtual community. The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a conceptual model of e‐formity in virtual communities.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected online from consumers who belonged to at least one virtual community. A total of 2,000 customers were drawn from a list of online consumer panels maintained by an online research company. Overall, 14.8 percent of those invited replied to the survey and were analyzed with structure equation modelling.

Findings

The results from the analysis indicate that both dimensions of conformity are distinct and have separate antecedents. Normative consumer conformity is influenced by internal consumer characteristics, whereas informational consumer conformity is related to external virtual community characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

Although this paper found evidence for e‐formity, the full nature and scope of e‐formity must be held to the classic findings of experimental versions of conformity research. There are broad implications for e‐formity in consumer behaviour and retailing. Retailers or manufacturers must realize that virtual communities and consumers' e‐formity behaviour are a valuable source of helping or hurting the sale and promotion of their products.

Practical implications

At the very least, the influence of e‐formity suggests that it is crucial for them to monitor closely the purposeful and nonpurposeful influences these virtual communications may have.

Originality/value

Given the scarcity of literature in the online conformity research area, this paper shows conformity in virtual communities does not change its influences on consumers' behaviour. As in the studies of traditional communities, e‐formity has found influence on virtual communities within two aspects. Virtual communities not only have inherited the social functions of traditional communities, but also have differences in antecedents.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Sungha Jang, Jinsoo Kim, Reo Song and Ho Kim

Actual product-harm crises pose significant challenges to firms, but so can defaming product-harm crises, which are defined as crises caused by false or malicious rumors…

Abstract

Purpose

Actual product-harm crises pose significant challenges to firms, but so can defaming product-harm crises, which are defined as crises caused by false or malicious rumors made by consumers or competing firms. Unlike typical product-harm crises, in defaming product-harm crises, the truth often emerges only after substantial damage has been done to the victim firm. Thus, crisis management strategies in these two cases may be different. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a defaming product-harm crisis that involved two competing firms, this paper examines how the firms changed their advertising strategies and how the changes affected consumersonline search behavior regarding the two firms.

Findings

The analyses show that after the crisis, the offending firm sensitively reacted to its own and the victim firm’s advertising levels, but the victim firm did not react to the offending firm’s advertising as it had previously. The effectiveness of advertising on consumersonline search weakened for both firms after the crisis.

Originality/value

The paper provides a new insight about marketing strategies and their effectiveness in the product-harm crisis literature.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Carina Simon, Tim Oliver Brexendorf and Martin Fassnacht

Consumer engagement has been designated as an approach to describing online interactions that more comprehensively reflects the nature of consumers’ interactive…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumer engagement has been designated as an approach to describing online interactions that more comprehensively reflects the nature of consumers’ interactive relationships in online brand communities. This paper aims to explore consumers’ brand community engagement in the context of Facebook brand pages. This research puts forth the hypothesis that consumers’ brand community engagement on Facebook is dependent upon two overarching themes: external social forces and internal personal forces.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on social impact theory, social identity theory and social exchange theory, a conceptual research model is developed and empirically tested through structural equation modelling using cross-sectional data of 460 Facebook brand fans.

Findings

The empirical results suggest that internal personal forces primarily positively influence brand community engagement, while external social forces can even impact consumers’ brand community engagement negatively.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should test and validate the proposed model for specific categories and brands.

Practical implications

This paper offers help to online brand marketers to trigger meaningful engagement of consumers in a brand community on Facebook.

Originality/value

This paper examines the consumer engagement construct from a behavioural perspective in a defined social media context and highlights the peculiarities of online brand communities on Facebook that distinguish them from traditional brand communities. The research uses a strong theoretical foundation to develop a model that investigates the prevalent variables that influence consumers’ brand community engagement on Facebook.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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