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Article
Publication date: 22 January 2021

Dhruba Kumar Gautam and Prakash Kumar Gautam

Every day thousands of academic institutes suspend their classes and students are staying in their home maintaining social distancing due to the fear of COVID-19 pandemic…

Abstract

Purpose

Every day thousands of academic institutes suspend their classes and students are staying in their home maintaining social distancing due to the fear of COVID-19 pandemic and Nepal is no exception. Realizing these facts, this study aims to explore the factors for the effectiveness of online mode of classes to on-class course-based students and analyzes the perception of faculties and students toward online mode during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

It is based on exploratory research design, following mixed methods of qualitative and quantitative procedure. To build a rich understanding of the phenomenon, three-stage data collection procedure: preliminary interview, structural survey and validation were used.

Findings

This study revealed triplet factors: infrastructure, student and teacher as antecedents of effectiveness of online classes during a pandemic. Technological support, infrastructure availability, faculty and students' perception have a significant relationship for the effectiveness of the online mode of the teaching-learning process. Students faced anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic, but a higher willingness to learn reduces the level of anxiety.

Originality/value

This study significantly contributes to the future management of higher education and digs the future path of online and on-class teaching-learning practices.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2020

Adil Zia

This study explores the factors responsible for influencing online classes for business school during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study also examines the level of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the factors responsible for influencing online classes for business school during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study also examines the level of influence of these factors on online classes.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were collected online from 716 business school students using a questionnaire developed by the researcher. Smart PLS3 software was used to analyze the data.

Findings

Attitude, curriculum, motivation, technology and training were found to have an impact on online classes. Three variables (attitude, motivation and training) have a positive impact on online classes, whereas two variables (curriculum and technology) have a negative impact on the online classes. All the factors have been found to be significant except technology which is found to have an insignificant impact (p = 0.356) on online classes.

Research limitations/implications

Only one university’s students were surveyed.

Practical implications

Outlines the factors which have a positive and significant impact on online classes during COVID-19 pandemic. This study can be generalized through a student's community across the world as the students face similar problems associated with online classes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Social implications

Suggest factors that can be considered while COVID-19 pandemic during social distancing to make online classes more effective and to reduce the impact of this pandemic.

Originality/value

No study has documented the factors associated to impact the online classes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Abhinandan Kulal and Anupama Nayak

The study aims at analyzing the perception of teachers and students about online classes. The work tries to explain the opinions of students as regards the impact of online

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims at analyzing the perception of teachers and students about online classes. The work tries to explain the opinions of students as regards the impact of online courses, their comfortability in its usag, and the support received from teachers in online classes along with teachers' opinions on efficacy, teaching practice followed and training received for an online class.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis was carried out using the data collected through two separate structured questionnaires for students and teachers in Dakshina Kannada and Udupi District in Karnataka. Data were recorded in SPSS and analyzed by using descriptive statistics.

Findings

The study reveals that students are comfortable with online classes and are getting enough support from teachers but they do not believe that online classes will replace traditional classroom teaching. It also finds that teachers are facing difficulties in conducting online classes due to a lack of proper training and development for doing online classes. Technical issues are the major problem for the effectiveness of the online classes.

Practical implications

Most of the colleges think of implementing online classes in their courses. Hence, it becomes essential to obtain the opinions of participants of online classes before applying for it. This study may help colleges to get a general view of online classes among teachers and students.

Originality/value

Internet and new technologies gained importance in all fields including the education sector which gave scope for online classes. In addition to this, the COVID pandemic worldwide has also added to the relevance of online classes. In this light, it is necessary to understand student–teacher perceptions regarding online classes.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Shamsul Huq Bin Shahriar, Sayed Arafat, Nayeema Sultana, Silvia Akter, Md. Mahfuzur Rahman Khan, J.M. Ekram Hossain Nur and Syful Islam Khan

In 2020, the education system was preliminary halted by the COVID-19 crisis and went through radical improvisation, and online-based distance learning was the only…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2020, the education system was preliminary halted by the COVID-19 crisis and went through radical improvisation, and online-based distance learning was the only plausible initiative to continue educational activities ensuring health guidelines properly. However, in reality, such desperate measure in case of a lower-middle-income developing nation lacking proper structural capabilities raised some issues and concerns for both pupils and mentors, and this study aims to explore the practice of online-based distance learning in private universities of Bangladesh and the challenges associated with it.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory research is qualitative in nature. A total number of 89 undergraduate level university students from different private universities were divided into two main clusters and interviewed in depth.

Findings

The findings of this paper revealed that common developing country syndromes like improper technological infrastructure development, limitation to devices or internet accessibility and financial hindrances can disrupt the harmony of the online learning experience. Also, the lack of tech literacy has created a huge tension and psychological inertia among both the teachers and the students.

Social implications

The coronavirus pandemic event, with its dreadful influence, is creating immense mental pressures for students to cope well with the online learning system. Comprehending the underlying challenges affiliated with online-based distance learning and enabling faculties or respected personnel with training and development programs to handle impediments better way, this learning initiative can ensure the best outcomes.

Originality/value

The significance of this study lies in comprehending the feasibility of online-based education regarding lower-middle-income developing nation context and the realism of such learning process's acceptability considering its actual effectiveness.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2016

Tommy Wooten

As more courses move to online testing, it is important to understand how it can be used to enhance student learning. Adopting online testing strategies which have been…

Abstract

Purpose

As more courses move to online testing, it is important to understand how it can be used to enhance student learning. Adopting online testing strategies which have been documented to be effective (including increasing the frequency of testing, allowing the students to take the test “open book” and allowing the students two opportunities to take each test) may enhance student learning. This study assesses whether adopting these strategies, facilitated by online testing, leads to greater student learning.

Design/methodology/approach

I gathered data from eight sections of an undergraduate auditing course in which students in four sections of the class were tested using six online tests taken by the students outside of class. These six online tests were “open book” and allowed the students two opportunities to take each test. Scores from a common final exam are then compared to those from four sections of the same course where three in-class, traditional paper tests were administered. I also surveyed the online test group to gather information regarding their perceptions of online testing.

Findings

Students in the online group scored significantly higher on the tests and the final exam. Additionally, the online group reported a positive perception about their experience with online testing.

Practical implications

Online testing did not impair students’ learning, and if the testing environment is designed correctly, online testing may increase student learning.

Originality/value

Instructors considering introducing online testing should consider introducing some of the specific strategies and practical implications described in the chapter to increase student learning.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-969-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

William Drago and Jimmy Peltier

This study sought to determine the effect of class size on the evaluation of teaching effectiveness for on‐line courses using a standard student evaluation survey…

Abstract

This study sought to determine the effect of class size on the evaluation of teaching effectiveness for on‐line courses using a standard student evaluation survey instrument. The data set consists of all MBA courses taught online during an academic year at a large, regional Midwestern university in the U.S. Several simple regression analyses are performed with class size as the independent variable. Dependent variables analysed were global course effectiveness and summated indices representing “building blocks” of online effectiveness. These include course content, instructor support, course structure, student‐to‐student interaction and instructor to‐student interaction. Results indicate no significant relationship between class size and global course effectiveness. In addition, class size showed some significance in predicting instructor support and course structure. Unexpectedly the direction of this association was positive suggesting that larger classes lead to higher levels of instructor support and greater perceived course structure. A comparison to traditional courses is also provided.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Misha Chakraborty and Fredrick Muyia Nafukho

The purpose of this paper was to identify pertinent studies on the important issue of student engagement strategies in online courses and to establish from empirical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to identify pertinent studies on the important issue of student engagement strategies in online courses and to establish from empirical studies student engagement strategies that work.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopted the literature review approach. The authors conducted a thorough and systematic search of the literature to find empirical studies focusing on online engagement strategies within the field of education and distance learning. To generate as many relevant publications as possible, both manual and electronic searches were conducted. The databases used included; Academic Search Complete (Ebsco), Social Sciences Full Text (Wilson), ProQuest Education Journals, ProQuest Dissertation and Thesis, ProQuest Central, Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCIISI), ERIC, (Ebsco), SAGE Full-Text Collection (CSA), Google Scholar and Emerald.

Findings

The results of this paper revealed the several factors that can create engaging learning experiences for the online learners. The primary factors are as follows: creating and maintaining positive learning environment; building learning community; giving consistent feedback in timely manner; and using the right technology to deliver the right content.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is limited, as it is based on a review of literature. Empirical studies need to be conducted to support the ideas generated in this paper. For example, it is proposed that individual and institutional characteristics play an important role in promoting learner satisfaction in online courses. Additional studies that can explore this aspect in detail are needed.

Originality/value

The paper has both professional and educational implications. The findings of this paper can help identify areas where the instructors and designers of online classes need to focus. The student engagement strategies for online courses identified should assist both experienced and beginning online instructors in the design and successful delivery of online courses. Students taking online courses should find the results of this study invaluable.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 38 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Latisha Reynolds, Samantha McClellan, Susan Finley, George Martinez and Rosalinda Hernandez Linares

This paper aims to highlight recent resources on information literacy (IL) and library instruction, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight recent resources on information literacy (IL) and library instruction, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and IL published in 2015.

Findings

This paper provides information about each source, describes the characteristics of current scholarship and highlights sources that contain either unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and IL.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Kathy Michael

The purpose of this study is to identify student and staff experiences with online learning at higher education (HE) using the software Elluminate Live!

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify student and staff experiences with online learning at higher education (HE) using the software Elluminate Live!

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a qualitative approach, focusing on the reflections of participants (student and teacher) collated over a 12 month period of piloting online classes with Elluminate Live!

Findings

A number of insightful themes and issues emerged from the data collected from the journal reflections as well as other source documents such as meetings and emails. The themes considered in the paper include: increased flexibility and cost reductions, technical challenges, resistance to online learning, extension of online facilities and student engagement, and visual literacy skills.

Research limitations/implications

The school's virtual classroom strategies need to address staff and student concerns. Staff training and the establishment of effective support structures for embedding safe, secure, and rewarding virtual classrooms are required. Once these issues have been addressed, online classes can be expanded across numerous discipline areas within the school.

Originality/value

Currently, Australian scholarly papers focussing on the use of Elluminate Live! as a teaching tool to help develop curriculum at tertiary level are scarce. The significance of this study is to share the important knowledge garnered through reflective insights (via feedback and journal writing) which can act as a guide to other higher education universities looking at undertaking online learning.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Kristy J. Lauver, Dawna M. Drum, James M. Windsor and Sheila M. Miller

This study aims to examine why students choose to or choose not to take and their perspectives of online courses, by obtaining responses from both students who have and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine why students choose to or choose not to take and their perspectives of online courses, by obtaining responses from both students who have and have not taken online classes.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey methodology is used, including both open‐ended qualitative questions as well as a quantitative question.

Findings

Support for past research was found through students indicating the importance of flexibility and convenience in online courses. Countering past research was the high level of consistency between the two populations’ perspectives of online courses. Two key distinctions were found between the populations: the amount of focus on the cost of courses by those choosing not to take online classes, and the awareness of the need of self‐motivation needed in online courses by those who had taken them.

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted at just one organization, so generalizability across institutions would need to be confirmed.

Practical implications

Institutions need to be aware of what constitutes students’ choices and perspectives between the various methods of taking courses.

Social implications

Students may need additional preparation and realistic expectations in order to increase the likelihood of being successful in an online course. Institutions also need to maintain the rigor of their online courses to maintain an overall positive social perception of online education.

Originality/value

This study made a distinction between perspectives of students having had an online course and those who had not, as well as a distinction between choice in selecting online courses and student perceptions of online courses. These perceptions were explored through both quantitative and qualitative responses.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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