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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Penny Dade

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1571

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Reference Reviews, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Choon Yong Alex Tan, Kye Mon Min Swe and Veronica Poulsaeman

The purpose of this case study is to share the authors’ involvement and observation in adopting online exam as an evaluation tool, in the hope that others may too be able…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to share the authors’ involvement and observation in adopting online exam as an evaluation tool, in the hope that others may too be able to adapt and circumvent this lockdown period while bringing a more reliable methodological approach in an online exam.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a case study that reports the application of an online examination for a year 3 MBBS Professional Exam during the period of lockdown (movement control). This case highlights the conduct of online theory in the form of single best answer multiple choice questions and online practical via objective structured clinical examination, without jeopardizing the integrity of the system, and the measures adapted to mitigate potential academic dishonesty.

Findings

The authors’ observation shows that online exam can be conducted in scenario where conventional exam is not possible.

Research limitations/implications

This is an observation in a real-life scenario that discusses the purpose and the process. A single study may not be sufficient to relate the reliability and generalizability of the analysis.

Practical implications

The practice of social distancing is a hindrance towards traditional classroom teaching. Online exam has promising potential to be the solution to this problem. The authors have demonstrated that an MBBS theory and practical exam can be conducted remotely without any physical contact, without any compromise in achieving the learning objectives within the curriculum. Medical education can proceed with a new drive while ensuring the learning process continues a stable momentum.

Originality/value

Online examination is almost unheard of, especially for undergraduates in the medical programme. This study highlights a plausible approach in the design of the online examination and identifies the barriers and favourable edges of this platform.

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Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Jay Andrew Cohen

As online learning becomes more ubiquitous and particularly in consideration of the current need to move classroom based teaching online given Covid-19, it seems opportune…

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623

Abstract

Purpose

As online learning becomes more ubiquitous and particularly in consideration of the current need to move classroom based teaching online given Covid-19, it seems opportune to address the pedagogical differences between online and face-to-face teaching, so that online delivery moves beyond the paradigms of its face-to-face counterpart, such as the lecture. This paper explores the need for a fit for purpose pedagogical approach for online learning, as opposed to one in which a classroom based pedagogy is applied, often rather clumsily to an online learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The engagement of students in an online learning environment is closely associated with student success. The argument is that students who are actively engaged are more likely to learn and to achieve greater success. Student engagement is facilitated through the design and arrangement of the learning material, and by the presence, attitude and the facilitation of learning by the online teacher or trainer.

Findings

Rather than presenting any research findings this paper simply explores concepts relating to online learning design and online teaching.

Practical implications

The practical implication of this paper are better alignment between teaching/training interventions and learning design.

Originality/value

This paper is a viewpoint paper and is original. This paper has not been submitted elsewhere. 10; 10;This paper would be a valuable resource for those new to online learning or those looking to establish a fit for purpose approach to online learning.

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Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Allan H.K. Yuen, Liping Deng and Robert Fox

The purpose of this paper is to compare the use of WebCT in support of online and blended learning in the Faculty of Architecture of a Hong Kong university.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the use of WebCT in support of online and blended learning in the Faculty of Architecture of a Hong Kong university.

Design/methodology/approach

Paper questionnaires are used to collect students' experiences, perceptions and attitudes towards the online course they have undertaken. Focus group interviews are conducted with two groups of students at the end of the semester. In addition, both formal and informal interviews are conducted with the instructor to understand his perceptions and perspectives.

Findings

In general, students prefer to have course management systems (CMS) as a supplement to face‐to‐face lectures rather than as its replacement. They perceive WebCT as mainly a platform for downloading materials and submitting assignments rather than a platform for teaching and learning. Learning fully online is perceived as self‐learning. The traditional lecture is considered more effective and efficient by many students to grasp concepts and principles.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study at a Hong Kong university. However, it provides initial evidence to shed light on issues concerning the use of CMS in support of online and blended learning.

Practical implications

In order to ensure a more engaging and rewarding online learning experience, teacher's online presence should be strengthened. Other than teacher presence, the cognitive presence could be fostered through engineering the student‐to‐student interaction in co‐located settings.

Originality/value

The paper usefully demonstrates how the blended mode of learning that combines face‐to‐face and online learning has become increasingly popular, while the courses conducted entirely online are comparatively rare at universities in Hong Kong.

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Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1981

Alan E. Bayer and Gerald Jahoda

Industrial and academic users of online bibliographic searching over a year's time did not generally diminish their amount of use of other traditional manual means of…

Abstract

Industrial and academic users of online bibliographic searching over a year's time did not generally diminish their amount of use of other traditional manual means of information gathering activities. However, in comparison to less frequent users and nonusers, frequent users increased their reliance on librarians. Online users increased their appraisal of the adequacy of information services available to them, particularly as regards those aspects generally considered the primary benefits of online searching. Users positively increased their assessment of the utility of online searches to their work, and online bibliographic searching capability was subsequently adopted as a permanent feature in both the industrial and academic work settings.

Details

Online Review, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

David Wagner, Matthias Wenzel, Heinz-Theo Wagner and Jochen Koch

The purpose of this paper is to explore and illustrate how organizations may use online communities strategically to adapt to a changing business environment, specifically…

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9585

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and illustrate how organizations may use online communities strategically to adapt to a changing business environment, specifically from a dynamic capabilities perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents empirical evidence from three cases.

Findings

Online communities may help organizations to adapt to a changing business environment by allowing them to sense opportunities and threats, seize opportunities and reconfigure organizational assets.

Research limitations/implications

The paper contributes to both the strategy and the information systems literatures by providing empirical insights into the strategic use of online communities.

Practical implications

The results of the paper are relevant for managers, helping them to understand the strategic role online communities (may) play and illustrating ways to use them accordingly.

Originality/value

The paper addresses a previously defined gap in the literature and provides novel empirical evidence. As online communities become integral parts of digital strategy and open innovation initiatives, the paper is both timely and relevant.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Donald T. Hawkins

A bibliometric study of the online retrieval literature, published in 1978, has been updated. The data are based on a recent bibliography containing 3337 references. The…

Abstract

A bibliometric study of the online retrieval literature, published in 1978, has been updated. The data are based on a recent bibliography containing 3337 references. The literature continued to grow, reaching a peak annual output of 504 papers in 1981. A plateau, predicted in 1978, was not observed. The conference literature, dispersed at the time of the 1978 bibliometric study, has become centralized in four major proceedings: the annual meetings sponsored by Online, Inc., two conferences sponsored by Learned Information, and the annual meeting of the American Society for Information Science. Online retrieval papers have appeared in 479 journals, 47 of which have published five or more papers on the subject. The distribution of papers follows Bradford's Law if conference publications and journals are considered in the total corpus. Thirty‐one authors have contributed ten or more papers.

Details

Online Review, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

William A. Drago and Richard J. Wagner

It has become evident that students have diverse preferred learning styles and effective instructors must design and deliver courses to meet the needs of those students…

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12657

Abstract

It has become evident that students have diverse preferred learning styles and effective instructors must design and deliver courses to meet the needs of those students. This study investigates the four physiological learning styles of visual, aural, read‐write and kinesthetic as they apply to online education. Findings suggest that online students are more likely to have stronger visual and read‐write learning styles. Further, read‐write learners and students that were strong across all four learning styles were likely to evaluate course effectiveness lower than other students while aural/readwrite learners and students that were not strong on any learning style were more likely to evaluate course effectiveness higher than other students.

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Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Li Chen, Nan Wang and Ailing Qiao

The purpose of this paper is two fold. First, it presents the developmental stages and running modes of K12 Online Schools in China. Second, it illustrates online

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1220

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is two fold. First, it presents the developmental stages and running modes of K12 Online Schools in China. Second, it illustrates online education practice, its current status, and the use of ICT in online schools. The experiences and lessons learned from the development of the K12 Online Schools are presented, and suggestions are summarized for the sustainable development of the schools.

Design/methodology/approach

This study reviews relevant literature and uses questionnaires to collect information from the Beijing No. 4 Online School, which is a representative sample of K12 Online Schools.

Findings

K12 Online Schools have experienced three stages: the initial stage, the adjustment stage, and the steady stage. There are multiple modes of running K12 Online Schools in China. The schools mainly deliver their courses through a satellite‐based TV net or the internet. The main teaching and learning strategy is still lecturing. Teacher training is critical for improving and assuring the quality of online courses.

Practical implications

The rapid development of ICT can propel K12 Online Schools to maturity. However, more emphasis should be put on learner support and teachers' professional development.

Originality/value

This article summarizes K12 Online Schools practice and their current status in China. It will help in understanding the current development of online education in China and the challenges it faces.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

I. Elaine Allen and Jeff Seaman

The purpose of this paper is to examine the trends in the growth of online learning since 2002 and the change in the opinions and strategies of chief academic officers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the trends in the growth of online learning since 2002 and the change in the opinions and strategies of chief academic officers.

Design/methodology/approach

Annual surveys of chief academic officers from 2002‐2006 are summarized.

Findings

The paper finds that online courses and programs continue to grow at a rate of 20 percent or more per year and the quality of these courses continues to improve. Online education is part of the long‐term strategy of a majority of chief academic officers. Faculty lag in their acceptance of online courses.

Originality/value

This survey provides the first estimates of the number of online learners, online courses, and online programs. This is the first survey on the attitudes of chief academic officers towards online learning.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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