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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Nerys Edmonds and Jane Bremner

The physical health inequalities experienced by people with severe mental health problems are now well recognised. Lifestyle factors, in particular high rates of smoking…

Abstract

The physical health inequalities experienced by people with severe mental health problems are now well recognised. Lifestyle factors, in particular high rates of smoking, have been identified as a major contributor to the raised mortality and morbidity in this population. A programme was developed in West Surrey to address smoking cessation support needs in people with mental health problems. Mental health workers were trained to deliver stop smoking support and a pilot programme of one‐to‐one stop smoking support was established. An evaluation was conducted using semi‐structured interviews to explore clients' experiences of receiving the one‐to‐one support. Service users positively evaluated the support they had received: in particular, the needs‐led, flexible approach. The study provides further insights into the views and experiences of people with mental health problems undertaking a smoking cessation programme.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Chris Procter

The purpose of this paper is to describe a case study where student peer mentors were employed to motivate and assist undergraduates to secure optional professional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a case study where student peer mentors were employed to motivate and assist undergraduates to secure optional professional placement positions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the reasons for establishing the project, the recruitment and work carried out by the mentors. It explains a survey of students who had not undertaken placements the previous year to try to identify the activities that would be most effective on the part of the mentors. The mentors, together with the placement co‐coordinator, devised support ranging from one‐to‐one mentoring, drop in “clinics”, online support and large group talks. It discusses the results of this work and evaluates the responses of both mentors and mentees.

Findings

Those mentees who took part in the mentoring were typically those who were already enthusiastic about placement opportunities. The majority of students did not take advantage of mentoring support, including support on a drop‐in basis or one‐to‐one basis or support available online through a social network. It was found that the mentoring scheme did not significantly affect the proportion of students seeking or securing placements. However, the mentors themselves gained tremendous benefits from the mentoring scheme, in particular developing their communication skills and confidence.

Research limitations/implications

A thorough survey of potential mentees was not carried out after the project to ascertain the reasons for their lack of engagement.

Practical implications

There are two separate implications of this project. First, the mentoring scheme was valuable primarily for the mentors and not the mentees; and second, the level of support provided by the University is not the main factor in the low take up of optional placement opportunities. If these are felt to be sufficiently valuable for the student learning experience they need to be compulsory with appropriate support available – a mentoring scheme might then be of far more value to mentees.

Originality/value

There is very little published concerning the use of mentoring to facilitate work‐based learning so this paper is valuable for that alone. Furthermore, most published work on mentoring is located in the “best practice” school of pedagogical research where it is implicitly assumed that one must report on the success of an intervention. Frequently it is more valuable to examine more unexpected results of an intervention. This paper however shows much greater benefits achieved by the mentors than the mentees.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Peter Bates, Kathy Hardwick, Katie Sanderson, Raschel Sanghera and Jeannie Clough

This article aims to investigate some of the pitfalls and potential of supporting people on a one‐to‐one basis in their community in order to stimulate improvements in practice.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to investigate some of the pitfalls and potential of supporting people on a one‐to‐one basis in their community in order to stimulate improvements in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The article discusses a range of situations via several vignettes and draws advice out of these for support workers and their managers. Staff are encouraged to reflect on their approach to providing support in community settings in the context of person‐centred planning and Wolfensberger's theories.

Findings

Staff are encouraged to plan carefully so that they can hold back from doing too much for the person, engage as full participants rather than passive bystanders, and seek opportunities for the person to develop informal connections in the community. Managers are encouraged to develop risk management systems that promote contact with ordinary citizens and a culture of community participation through training and mentoring support staff.

Originality/value

Whilst most support staff willingly recount stories that illustrate the complexity of providing 1:1 support in the community, they have minimal access to publications, training or supervision on this topic. The article will stimulate further reflection by managers and front line staff so that people are supported more effectively in the community of their choice.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Ronan Madden

The aim of this paper is to examine whether an information literacy course/module is an appropriate intervention during the initial months of a humanities PhD, and if…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine whether an information literacy course/module is an appropriate intervention during the initial months of a humanities PhD, and if there is more that can be learned from the course participants that might provide a better understanding of their information behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was distributed to new humanities PhD students prior to their attending the course. A second questionnaire was distributed to those who had completed the course in full. Interviews were conducted with six participants to gain a richer understanding of how their information-seeking needs had evolved.

Findings

Despite the relatively generic nature of the module, and the diversity of humanities research, the course had clear benefits for the participants. In their first year, scoping their topic and finding quality information can pose a challenge. The participants reported that the most appropriate time to attend the course is during the initial months. Some preferred to attend (or repeat) particular units later as workshops. The most valued elements were those that helped them bridge initial gaps. Face-to-face delivery is preferred. There is some potential for further one-to-one contact with librarians and additional follow-up workshops.

Practical implications

This study can inform how librarians can better support PhD researchers in the humanities.

Originality/value

The study is based around an established and accredited humanities PhD course that has already been adapted in various ways in terms of content and timing of delivery. Drawing on Kuhlthau's “Information Search Process”, the study seeks a deeper understanding of a specific humanities group during the initial months of their PhD research.

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Carlina May Whitmore

The purpose of this paper is to share reflections and key learning points from the experience of offering peer support within a crisis house setting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share reflections and key learning points from the experience of offering peer support within a crisis house setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A reflective account of experiences of offering one-to-one peer support and the learning that has been taken from these experiences.

Findings

Key reflections centre on the importance of being emotionally honest and supporting personal well-being while offering peer support.

Originality/value

While there is a great deal written about the theory of peer support work, few first persons accounts of peer working have been published. This paper provides important insights into the nature of peer support work.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Frank Sligo

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges faced by tutors who were providing remedial literacy support to New Zealand apprentices.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges faced by tutors who were providing remedial literacy support to New Zealand apprentices.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a wider, triangulated study of employers, tutors, apprentices, and industry training coordinators, the author undertook a qualitative analysis of ten in‐depth interviews with apprentices’ literacy tutors.

Findings

It was found that three issues strongly affected what tutors could achieve for their students. First, tutors experienced substantial role ambiguity; second, apprentices were working in oral and experiential modes more than in print‐literate modes; and third, tutors found they had to employ an instrumental approach to their teaching in response to the situation they encountered. For example, this often meant serving as a scribe for their student rather than being able to focus on building the apprentice's print literacy.

Research limitations/implications

It is possible that the difficult situation faced by these literacy tutors may be replicated in similar situations where funding is insufficient to build competence in literacy.

Practical implications

The constraints on what the tutors could actually achieve within tight funding limits meant that most students, while on track to successfully complete their apprenticeship, still remained of low print literacy.

Originality/value

The study reveals how tutors’ instrumental approach ran counter to their traditional ethical stance associated with building empowered, competent citizens who could participate fully in their civic, social and economic settings. It also shows how this literacy support enhanced the apprentices’ confidence, yet they probably became further reinforced in their little‐changed, oral work culture.

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Diane Sloan, Elizabeth Porter, Karen Robins and Karen McCourt

A research paper on the design and implementation of an e-learning resource responding to the globalisation of education. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the…

Abstract

Purpose

A research paper on the design and implementation of an e-learning resource responding to the globalisation of education. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the challenges presented in learning and teaching on how to support international postgraduate (PG) students undertaking the specific task of a dissertation.

Design/methodology/approach

Using findings from 250 PG students, 40 supervisors and two module tutors the research identified the content and language issues faced by students and recognised the need to design an enabler supporting the latter as independent learners and the academic staff delivering support.

Findings

The e-learning tool provides an independent learning tool which addresses student concerns relating to the process and content of structuring a dissertation and the function of language. Initial responses have been positive from both staff and students in respect to providing a source of student support and feedback.

Originality/value

The research shows how the Dissertation Game Model (DGM), evolved into an e-learning resource supporting student understanding of the content, structure, planning and writing of a dissertation. The e-learning tool focuses on helping international students understand what the generic contents of each chapter of a dissertation should contain and supports them in engaging in research as a transferable skill.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 56 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

Tim Minshall, Letizia Mortara, Stelios Elia and David Probert

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the development of the final outputs of a research project looking at partnerships between technology‐based start‐ups and large…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the development of the final outputs of a research project looking at partnerships between technology‐based start‐ups and large firms (“asymmetric” partnerships). It presents the stage of the research aimed at understanding how best to design outputs to assist firms in managing such partnerships.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of company case studies, company workshops, an end‐user survey and pilot dissemination programme were used to identify an appropriate form for the packaging and delivery of the research findings (i.e. what problems can be encountered in such partnerships, and what approaches companies have implemented to overcome these problems).

Findings

A range of approaches for overcoming the problems of managing partnerships between firms whose age and size are markedly different were catalogued. The research presented in this paper revealed that companies felt best able to learn from the experiences of others through a combination of direct support, multi‐company workshops, and online access to selected materials.

Research limitations/implications

The generalisability of the findings may be limited by the fact that the majority of the organisations collaborating in this research either were located in the high‐technology business cluster in and around the city of Cambridge, UK or had formed partnerships with companies in this geographic region.

Practical implications

Partnerships between technology‐based start‐ups and technology‐intensive large firms can provide an effective means of accessing and integrating the complementary assets required to bring a novel technology to market. This research will help firms overcome the numerous challenges involved in setting up and managing such partnerships by providing stakeholders with easier access to academic research findings. It will assist researchers who are considering how to disseminate research outputs to industry.

Originality/value

There is a strong body of work on improving the performance of partnerships in general, but less on overcoming the practical challenges of managing partnerships between firms of markedly different age and scale. In addition, the selection of the optimum process for ensuring that the findings of such research are used to support implementation remains a topic of debate. This work helps to address both gaps.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Abstract

Details

Recognising Students who Care for Children while Studying
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-672-6

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Martin Whiteford, Will Haydock and Nicky Cleave

As UK substance misuse policy has increasingly focused on the concept of recovery, policymakers, service providers and service users have found “recovery capital” a useful…

Abstract

Purpose

As UK substance misuse policy has increasingly focused on the concept of recovery, policymakers, service providers and service users have found “recovery capital” a useful concept to understand the barriers to and facilitators of recovery from substance misuse. There is a rich strand of research that considers the composition of recovery capital in terms of the relevance of resources such as access to mutual aid, familial support and friendship networks, stable housing, structured psychosocial support and education, training and employment. However, such general accounts have tended not to engage with the potential spatial element of recovery capital; that is, how location contributes to the acquisition and management of recovery capital. The purpose of this paper is to add nuance to more generalised accounts through a critical interrogation, exploration and analysis of the role of geography in recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on in-depth interviews with service users and service providers in a predominantly rural county in the south-west of England.

Findings

The ability to build and sustain recovery capital is shown to be marked by a complex web of social and spatial inclusions/exclusions.

Originality/value

This paper makes three important contributions to prevailing understandings of recovery capital. First, it shows how narratives of recovery are intimately tied to perceptions and experiences of place. Second, it reveals some of the important challenges and complex dilemmas that local drug and alcohol commissioners face in designing and delivering recovery-orientated treatment systems. Third, and finally, it argues that there is a pressing need for a more nuanced appreciation of the social and spatial dynamics of recovery capital.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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