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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Chamila Subasinghe

While some people are mindful of what a personal space that also belongs to a common façade portrays to outsiders, why other people treat this personal space as a mere…

Abstract

Purpose

While some people are mindful of what a personal space that also belongs to a common façade portrays to outsiders, why other people treat this personal space as a mere utility space invisible to the public eye must be determined. International students who live in single-bedroom apartments with balconies and were mostly married were investigated regarding the meaning they attach to their balcony spaces. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This work also hypothesized that residents of these units perceived their balconies as a liminal space that oscillates between a spatial repertoire for familiar memories and a versatile, utilitarian device for temporary storage. A naturalistic inquiry was then conducted among purposefully sampled apartment dwellers via in-depth, open-ended and semi-structured interviews.

Findings

While offering much needed spatial economy to dwellers, the cues and codes revealed that the balcony space could furnish a sense of membership to established social cohorts. The balcony space further brings an element of escape and ease into impecunious student life by means of its ability to offer a broad spectrum of spatial-aspatial needs that manifested in forms of personalizations and exploitations.

Originality/value

A knowledge gap in socio-cultural appropriation of on-campus apartments for sustainable redevelopment where the majority of consumers were married/partnered, international students has been investigated.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Mohamad Fazli Sabri, Christine C. Cook and Clinton G. Gudmunson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between personal and family backgrounds, academic ability, childhood consumer experience, financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between personal and family backgrounds, academic ability, childhood consumer experience, financial socialization, financial literacy, and perceived financial well‐being of college students.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a multi‐stage sampling technique from 11 public and private universities across Malaysia and the sample consists of 2,219 college students. Structural equation modelling was utilized to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Childhood consumer experiences such as savings habits contribute to students’ financial well‐being (money saved, current financial situation, and financial management skills). Financial socialization agents, for example, through parents and religion sources could increase college students’ financial well‐being. Financial literacy was related to financial well‐being. There were important differences between the Malay and Chinese ethnic groups in Malaysia.

Research limitations/implications

Overall, implications and recommendations for future research, teaching, and public policy are also provided for parents, college administrators, counselors and educators.

Originality/value

This research provides meaningful information about how various factors (childhood experience, financial socialization, and financial literacy) predict students’ financial well‐being.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Joyce Weil, Gwyneth Milbrath, Teresa Sharp, Jeanette McNeill, Elizabeth Gilbert, Kathleen Dunemn, Marcia Patterson and Audrey Snyder

Integrated transitions of care for rural older persons are key issues in policy and practice. Interdisciplinary partnerships are suggested as ways to improve rural-care…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrated transitions of care for rural older persons are key issues in policy and practice. Interdisciplinary partnerships are suggested as ways to improve rural-care transitions by blending complementary skills of disciplines to increase care’s holistic nature. Yet, only multidisciplinary efforts are frequently used in practice and often lack synergy and collaboration. The purpose of this paper is to present a case of a partnership model using nursing, gerontology and public health integration to support rural-residing elders as a part of building an Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner program.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses the Centre for Ageing Research and Development in Ireland/O’Sullivan framework to examine the creation of an interdisciplinary team. Two examples of interdisciplinary work are discussed. They are the creation of an interdisciplinary public health course and its team-based on-campus live simulations with a panel and site visit.

Findings

With team-building successes and challenges, outcomes show the need for knowledge exchange among practitioners to enhance population-centered and person-centered care to improve health care services to older persons in rural areas.

Practical implications

There is a need to educate providers about the importance of developing interdisciplinary partnerships. Educational programming illustrates ways to move team building through the interdisciplinary continuum. Dependent upon the needs of the community, other similarly integrated partnership models can be developed.

Originality/value

Transitions of care work for older people tends to be multi- or cross-disciplinary. A model for interdisciplinary training of gerontological practitioners in rural and frontier settings broadens the scope of care and improves the health of the rural older persons served.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Shontarius D. Aikens

The author used narrative research as a research methodology.

Abstract

Research methodology

The author used narrative research as a research methodology.

Case overview/synopsis

Winston Thompson is the new Residential Manager of Drayson Residential Complex at Sybel University. After meeting with staff in his area of responsibility and learning about the complexities of his new position, Winston needs to determine the best way to build positive relationships with each member of the leadership team in his complex. In this case, students are challenged to determine the best relationship building approach for each staff member using concepts from leader–member exchange theory while also taking into consideration issues of race, age and gender.

Complexity academic level

This case is written for undergraduates in either an upper level leadership or organizational behavior course. The case can be adapted for graduate courses and executive education depending upon the work experience of the individuals.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Tamara Savelyeva and Sara Rickards

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Lisa Leitz

This article looks at girls who fight in order to evaluate theories of education for marginalized girls. As oppositional culture and educational resistance theories…

Abstract

This article looks at girls who fight in order to evaluate theories of education for marginalized girls. As oppositional culture and educational resistance theories suggest for boys’ misconduct in school, girl fights are found to be a product of deindustrialization, family expectations, and peer culture. Within peer groups of marginalized students an oppositional culture develops such that girls gain respect from their peers by fighting because they demonstrate a necessary toughness. Girls who fight have a complicated relationship to education. Contrary to oppositional culture theory, these girls value educational achievement. However, the girls’ relationships with teachers are strained. Teachers do not appreciate “tough” girls. Race, class, and gender together construct a student culture that produces girls who fight in school.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 23 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Phetphrairin Upping and Judy Oliver

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the transition of the accounting systems from cash based to accrual based, in Thai public universities. The focus is on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the transition of the accounting systems from cash based to accrual based, in Thai public universities. The focus is on the factors both influencing and affecting the accounting change.

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes a quantitative approach with data collected through a mail survey to the Chief Financial Officer of each of the 78 Thai public universities. Statistical analysis included both descriptive analysis and ANOVA to analyse differences between universities.

Findings

The main catalysts for change have come from both external and internal sources. The Thai government requires public agencies to adapt their accounting practices in line with New Public Management (NPM) and university management need improved information for planning and control purposes. The most important change has been to the financial accounting system with the adoption of computerised accrual accounting practices. The major factor influencing the change process is low institutional capacity of some Thai universities which is evidenced by the lack of technological resources and staff with knowledge of private sector accounting practices. Universities that either have or intend to become autonomous have given more importance to accounting system changes; and universities that have achieved more success in the change process note the importance of external consultants, and staff having an understanding and knowledge of data requirements.

Practical implications

This paper adds to the literature on accounting change in the public sector in less developed countries by highlighting factors influencing accounting change and factors that can be barriers to and facilitators of change. The findings provide further evidence of the issues confronted by public agencies in developing countries adopting new accounting practices and highlights the importance of training of local staff before the change process commences. Training is critical for knowledge transfer to enable staff to gain the knowledge and skills needed to assist in the change of accounting practices.

Originality/value

This paper presents a contribution to the government accounting change literature by highlighting public sector agencies in a developing country, Thailand. In both developed and developing countries, public universities are now operating in an environment of decreased government funding coupled with university management taking more responsibility for financial management. This study provides an insight into the changes taking place in Thai public universities in relation to the accounting system to support this new operating environment.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

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