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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 July 2022

Omwoyo Bosire Onyancha

This study aims to explore the similarities and differences between the three concepts that are commonly used to describe the knowledge of traditional and indigenous…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the similarities and differences between the three concepts that are commonly used to describe the knowledge of traditional and indigenous communities, namely, indigenous knowledge, traditional knowledge and local knowledge, with a view to contributing to the discourse on conceptualizing indigenous knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was extracted from the Scopus database using the main terms that are used for indigenous knowledge, namely, “indigenous knowledge” (IK), “traditional knowledge” (TK) and “local knowledge” (LK). Data were analyzed according to the themes drawn from the objectives of the study, using the VOSviewer software and the analytical tool embedded in the Scopus database.

Findings

The findings indicate that whereas IK and LK are older concepts than TK, TK has become more visible in the literature than the former; there is minimal overlap in the use of the labels in the literature; the three labels’ literature is largely domiciled in the social sciences; and that there were variations in representation of the labels according to countries and geographic regions.

Practical implications

The author avers that the scatter of literature on the knowledge of traditional and indigenous peoples under the three main labels has huge implications on the accessibility and use the literature by stakeholders including researchers, students, information and knowledge managers and information service providers.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates the application of informetrics beyond is traditional use to assess trends, nature and types of research patterns and mathematical modeling of information patterns to encompass the definition of the scope of concepts as covered in the literature.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Siviwe Bangani and Omwoyo Bosire Onyancha

The purpose of this paper is to establish the research impact of the National Research Foundation (NRF)-rated researchers’ output at the North-West University (NWU), South…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish the research impact of the National Research Foundation (NRF)-rated researchers’ output at the North-West University (NWU), South Africa, from 2006 to 2017.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used bibliometrics and altmetrics methods to determine the production of research outputs and the impact of NWU’s NRF-rated researchers’ publications. Various tools including Google Scholar (GS), Web of Science (WoS), Scopus, ResearchGate (RG) and Mendeley were used to collect data. The citations in the three bibliographic databases were used as proxy for academic impact, while reads and readerships in RG and Mendeley were used to determine societal impact of the researchers. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) was used to test the relationship between citations in the three bibliographic databases and reads and readerships in RG and Mendeley.

Findings

The main findings were that the majority of NWU’s NRF-rated researchers’ publications emanated from GS, followed by Scopus and then WoS. GS output also had more citations. There were 6,026 research outputs in RG which were read for 676,919 times and 5,850 in Mendeley with 142,621 readerships. Correlations between RG and all three bibliographic databases’ citations were scant. Strong relationships between the three bibliographic databases’ citations and Mendeley readerships were found.

Practical implications

Academic librarians who interact with researchers who would like to predict future academic impact of their documents can be advised to consider Mendeley readerships with some level of confidence compared to RG reads. These results point to the importance of constant self-evaluation by researchers to ensure that they have balanced profiles across the three main bibliographic databases that are also considered for ratings. These results point to the relevancy of GS to evaluate research beyond the academy.

Social implications

The fact that researchers are contributing research that seeks to improve the general welfare of the population (beyond the academy) is a positive sign as society look up to researchers and research to solve their socio-economic problems. Social media play an important role as they serve as indicators that indicators point to wider research impacts and wider access by many different groups of people including the members of society at large. They point to research that is accessible to not only researchers and those who have access to their research but also the society at large.

Originality/value

Although the practice of rating researchers is common in different research ecosystems, the researchers could not find any evidence of studies conducted using a combination of bibliometrics and altmetrics to asses rated researchers’ output. This study covers and compares social impact based on data obtained from two academic social media sites and three main bibliographic databases (GS, Scopus and WoS).

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 70 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Omwoyo Bosire Onyancha

The purpose of this paper is to map and visualise collaboration patterns and citation impact of the library and information science research in sub-Saharan Africa between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to map and visualise collaboration patterns and citation impact of the library and information science research in sub-Saharan Africa between 1995 and 2016.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were extracted from the Thomson Reuters’ citation indexes using the name of the country in an advanced search platform. The search was limited to documents designated as articles. Data were analysed using the VosViewer software to obtain network maps and frequencies of occurrence.

Findings

The findings reveal that publication and citation impact of LIS research in sub-Saharan Africa has continued to grow since 1995; foreign countries have immensely contributed to the evolution and development of LIS research in the region; research collaboration occurs both regionally and internationally, with the latter being the most prominent; South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya are the most active participants in LIS research collaboration in the region; and that on average, international collaboration in LIS research in sub-Saharan Africa attracts more citations than other types of collaboration.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to the data indexed in the Web of Science citation indexes and focused on sub-Saharan African countries only.

Practical implications

Collaboration is said to lead to increased research output and impact, hence the need for sub-Saharan African researchers and institutions to initiate strategies that will create conducive environments for research collaboration. There is need for collaborative ventures between LIS practitioners and educators as well as increased cooperation among LIS schools within and outside of sub-Saharan African countries. Partnerships involving students and programmes such as research fellowship, post-doctoral researchers as well as visiting researchers may complement any existing strategies that can be pursued to increase collaborative research in LIS in the region.

Originality/value

The paper, while drawing lessons from previous papers, adopted a variety of techniques to examine collaboration patterns and impact of LIS research over a longer period of publication time, i.e. 1995 to 2016, and a larger geographic scope.

Details

Library Management, vol. 39 no. 6-7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Omwoyo Bosire Onyancha

This paper aims to examine and compares the extent and types of research collaboration and their citation impact in selected countries in sub-Saharan Africa using…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine and compares the extent and types of research collaboration and their citation impact in selected countries in sub-Saharan Africa using co-authorship amongst countries as a proxy indicator.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports the findings of a bibliometric study of publications that were published by authors affiliated to Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria and Tanzania, between 2000 and 2019 and indexed in the Web of Science’s (WoS) three citation indexes. The social network analysis technique was adopted to articulate collaborative partnerships between and amongst geographical regions. Correlational tests were conducted to gauge the relationship between the frequency and intensity of collaboration and the influence of collaboration on citation impact. The paper highlights the characteristics of country collaborations, the nature of collaboration and the corresponding research impact and relates the types of collaboration to citation impacts in each country.

Findings

The findings reveal that Nigeria and Kenya have had wider and stronger collaborations than Ethiopia, Ghana and Tanzania; the number of collaborating countries has continued to grow in the five countries’ research ecosystems; there are statistically significant relationships between collaboration and citation impact in each country; international collaboration has yielded the most number of citations, with the global North performing better than the South and regional countries; and that the number of citations for the countries more than doubles through research collaboration.

Research limitations/implications

Co-authorship of publications has been faulted but remains the most reliable proxy indicator of research collaboration. The study of the five countries, though depicting patterns of collaboration in many sub-Saharan African countries, cannot be generalised to the entire region.

Practical implications

The current study has policy implications as far as decisions on research collaboration are concerned. Sub-Saharan African countries and indeed the developing countries may consider re-examining their emphasis on international collaboration to the neglect of domestic and regional collaboration. While the study supports international collaboration, it nevertheless recommends a three-tier collaboration, wherein international collaboration is juxtaposed with domestic and/or regional collaboration.

Originality/value

The study uses social network analysis of country collaboration in developing countries. The intensity and frequency of collaboration are examined in relation to research impact.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 70 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Ifeanyi Jonas Ezema and Omwoyo Bosire Onyancha

The purpose of this study is to examine whether open accessibility of medical journals published in Africa may influence journals’ citation impact.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine whether open accessibility of medical journals published in Africa may influence journals’ citation impact.

Design/methodology/approach

An evaluative informetric research approach was used to compare 134 health and medical (H&M) journals hosted in the African Journals Online (AJOL) database. Harzing’s Publish or Perish (PoP) software was used to extract the following publication and citation data from Google Scholar: citation counts, number of papers and the h-index of the journals. Three null hypotheses were formulated to guide the study.

Findings

A total of 65 open access (OA) and 69 non-OA H&M journals of African origin were found in AJOL. Only 20 African countries have journals hosted in AJOL, with more than 53% of them from Nigeria and 13.4% from South Africa. Findings reveal that non-OA H&M journals performed poorly in terms of citations compared with their OA counterparts. The t-test analysis revealed high significant difference in the citations and research impacts of OA and non-OA H&M journals published in Africa.

Practical implications

The study will assist in collection development in medical and health libraries globally and in Africa particularly. The study will also be a useful guide to journal publishers, health researchers and health workers providing information on where to publish and the journals to subscribe.

Social implications

Apart from adding to the body of knowledge in scholarly communication in Africa, this study will go a long way in influencing policies in H&M research in Africa.

Originality/value

AJOL is the only online database hosting journals from all countries in Africa. Unfortunately, the quality and research impact of the journals in the database have not been adequately investigated. The paper adopted an informetric approach to evaluate H&M journals in Africa so as to provide wider insight on the contents and quality of the journals hosted in it.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2022

Williams E. Nwagwu and Omwoyo Bosire Onyancha

This paper aims to examine the global pattern of growth and development of eHealth research based on publication headcount, and analysis of the characteristics, of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the global pattern of growth and development of eHealth research based on publication headcount, and analysis of the characteristics, of the keywords used by authors and indexers to represent their research content during 1945–2019.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a bibliometric research design and a quantitative approach. The source of the data was Elsevier’s Scopus database. The search query involved multiple search terms because researchers’ choice of keywords varies very significantly. The search for eHealth research publications was limited to conference papers and research articles published before 2020.

Findings

eHealth originated in the late 1990s, but it has become an envelope term for describing much older terms such as telemedicine, and its variants that originated much earlier. The keywords were spread through the 27 Scopus Subject Areas, with medicine (44.04%), engineering (12.84%) and computer science (11.47%) leading, while by Scopus All Science Journal Classification Health Sciences accounted for 55.83% of the keywords. Physical sciences followed with 30.62%. The classifications social sciences and life sciences made only single-digit contributions. eHealth is about meeting health needs, but the work of engineers and computer scientists is very outstanding in achieving this goal.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that eHealth is an unexplored aspect of health literature and highlights the nature of the accumulated literature in the area. It further demonstrates that eHealth is a multidisciplinary area that is attractive to researchers from all disciplines because of its sensitive focus on health, and therefore requires pooling and integration of human resources and expertise, methods and approaches.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2023

Sibongile Ngwenya and Omwoyo Bosire Onyancha

This paper aims to explore the diffusion of Intellectual Property (IP) knowledge in universities in Zimbabwe. Specifically, the study examines the tools, policies…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the diffusion of Intellectual Property (IP) knowledge in universities in Zimbabwe. Specifically, the study examines the tools, policies, programmes and unique strategies used by the universities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports the findings of a survey that was conducted on a population of lecturers (1,546), research officers (RO) (11), IP officer (1), faculty librarians (FLs) (27) and final year undergraduate students (9,224) at universities in Zimbabwe. Questionnaires were administered to the lecturers and students while interviews were administered to the IP officer, ROs and FLs. Data analysis comprised the use of Google forms and Microsoft Excel software.

Findings

The findings reveal diffusing IP knowledge in Zimbabwean universities involves mainly the use of policies and regulations, library web pages, workshops, although not specifically on IP, presentations on IP in the university, advice and guidance services and IP lectures/teaching.

Research limitations/implications

This study presents the IP situation in Zimbabwe and its findings may be applied to Africa and other developing countries.

Practical implications

This study endorses IP as a national issue and suggests a benchmark for diffusing knowledge on IP in Zimbabwean universities.

Originality/value

This study acknowledges the multi-disciplinary nature of IP and should lead to all university students graduating with adequate knowledge on IP.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 May 2022

Blessing Chiparausha, Omwoyo Bosire Onyancha and Ifeanyi Jonas Ezema

This study aims to examine the use of social media by academic librarians at universities in Zimbabwe with particular focus on the application of the four key constructs…

1029

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the use of social media by academic librarians at universities in Zimbabwe with particular focus on the application of the four key constructs of the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology model. This study assesses the degree to which academic librarians in Zimbabwe believe that using social media enhances service delivery, the extent to which academic librarians perceive social media as easy to use, the influence of peers on social media use among academic librarians and the extent to which facilitating conditions influence social media use.

Design/methodology/approach

A pragmatist worldview in which both quantitative and qualitative methods were adopted, this multiple case study used face-to-face interviews, self-administered questionnaires and content analysis for collecting data.

Findings

Academic librarians in Zimbabwe perceive social media tools to be useful and easy to use in the provision of services. Social influence had a moderate effect on academic librarians’ use of social media for service delivery at universities in Zimbabwe, but they feel that their supervisors do not provide enough help for them to use social media.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no similar study has been done previously in Zimbabwe. This multiple case study presents useful findings on the acceptance and use of social media by academic librarians in Zimbabwe.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

Fidelis Mutisya and Omwoyo Bosire Onyancha

The study examined users' perceived level of service at the African Union Court on Human and Peoples' Rights (AUCHPR) library in Arusha, Tanzania.

Abstract

Purpose

The study examined users' perceived level of service at the African Union Court on Human and Peoples' Rights (AUCHPR) library in Arusha, Tanzania.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a quantitative approach in line with the tenets of the LibQUAL and SERVQUAL protocols, which were used as theoretical lenses and informed the development of questionnaires which were used to collect data. The target population consisted of 94 library users.

Findings

The study found that the library's best services, in terms of their quality and as perceived by users, lie in its human resources (i.e. affect of service, assurance and responsiveness). On the other hand, the lowest perceived level of services was recorded in the aspects related to information collection and physical facilities (i.e. library as a place and tangibles).

Research limitations/implications

This study was based on the African Court on Human and Peoples' Rights library in Arusha, Tanzania. The study covered both internal and external users of the library.

Practical implications

The study identified strengths and weaknesses of the African Court library as far as the perceived level of service is concerned, and the findings can therefore be used to inform decisions on the improvement of quality of the library services. In so doing, the library will be in a stronger position to offer quality services and assist the court in attaining its objectives of promoting and protecting human rights in Africa. With improved library service quality, the non-judicial staff, external users and society in general will stand to benefit from the library.

Originality/value

While drawing lessons from previous service quality studies, this study is the first quality assessment study to be done in the African Court library. It is also the first to use a combination of LibQUAL and SERVQUAL models in the context of the African Court library services.

Details

Library Management, vol. 41 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Dennis Ocholla, Lyudmila Ocholla and Omwoyo Bosire Onyancha

This study seeks to establish and compare the research and publication patterns and output of academic librarians in Eastern Africa from 2000 to 2009 using informetric techniques.

1185

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to establish and compare the research and publication patterns and output of academic librarians in Eastern Africa from 2000 to 2009 using informetric techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

The study confined its scope to publications produced between 2000 and 2009. The informetric technique (through content analysis) was used as a research method. The documents that were sourced for content analysis were obtained from the LISA database, which is one of the largest abstract databases in the field of library and information science (LIS). Data were extracted using the names of the librarians obtained from various sources, including: the libraries' web sites, Europa World of Learning and Wikipedia.

Findings

The results reveal that the research visibility of academic librarians was insignificant; that publication of research findings over the period was minimal; that publications from university librarians and directors were also minimal; that most academic librarians preferred publishing individually; and that the most published authors come from Tanzania.

Originality/value

Few informetric studies focus on research output of academic librarians in Africa, and also on LIS research in the continent. Furthermore, the library profession is not well understood by many (including the academic community) because people do not appreciate how qualified librarians are, or that their promotion can be linked to research. This study raises issues that relate to the research output and research visibility of university librarians.

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