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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2008

Chrysostomos Giannoulakis, David Stotlar and David Chatziefstathiou

Over the past decade, the Olympic Movement has become increasingly dependent upon financial support provided by corporate sponsors. This study explores the evolution of…

Abstract

Over the past decade, the Olympic Movement has become increasingly dependent upon financial support provided by corporate sponsors. This study explores the evolution of the Olympic sponsorship programme, presents current and future marketing strategies employed by sponsors, and discusses major challenges within the programme.

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International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Patrick De Groote

In this article the development of the Olympic Games (the biggest mega sport event ever) will be described as an interesting case in the sport‐tourism relationship. The…

Abstract

In this article the development of the Olympic Games (the biggest mega sport event ever) will be described as an interesting case in the sport‐tourism relationship. The Olympics are indeed the biggest show on earth … the most participants in history, … spectators on site and the greatest television audience ever. This marriage of convenience between sport and tourism will be explored and examplified, first in general and second by means of on historical overview (of the Summer and Winter Games) and the economic impact of the Olympic Games.

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Tourism Review, vol. 60 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Abstract

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International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2014

Robert VanWynsberghe and Caitlin Pentifallo

This chapter coins the term Development through Mega-Events (DME) in order to propose a next step for developing social legacies in accordance with the principle of social…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter coins the term Development through Mega-Events (DME) in order to propose a next step for developing social legacies in accordance with the principle of social development.

Design/methodology/approach

This chapter’s argument for DME is developed using quantitative, indicator-based data from the Olympic Games Impact (OGI) study as well as relevant literature from the sub-fields of Sport for Development and Peace and Sport Mega-Events.

Findings

We discuss the absence of a baseline understanding of the properties of sport mega-events. Also absent are progressive efforts to achieve sustainability by means other than competition among prospective bidders. We recommend that hosts tie social legacies to public policy objectives that are concomitant with the properties of the sport mega-events. Retrospectively applied, OGI data from 2010 reveals social inclusion as one potential social legacy that reflects the nature of the Olympics and the policy realm in the host region.

Originality/value

This chapter is original work. It would be of interest to potential host communities, policymakers, and researchers.

Details

Sport, Social Development and Peace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-885-3

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Laura Alexandra Brown and Manuel Cresciani

The Olympic Games is the largest sporting mega event of its type, with deep cultural and historical roots. The event is short lived compared to the lifespan of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The Olympic Games is the largest sporting mega event of its type, with deep cultural and historical roots. The event is short lived compared to the lifespan of the infrastructure required in host cities. The purpose of this paper is to examine models of adaptability in Olympic construction, using case studies in previous Olympic host cities of the Summer Olympic Games (Rome 1960, London 2012), to assess the impact of adaptability on future legacy.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach (archival research, direct observation), was used in two case studies: Rome (Palazzetto dello Sport, Palazzo dello Sport), and London (London Olympic Velodrome, London Aquatics Centre). The case studies examined how adaptability was used in design to secure legacy.

Findings

In the selected case studies (Rome 1960, London 2012), adaptability has had a positive impact on the post-Games use of venues, all four of which remain in use today. However, there are multiple factors that contribute to post-Games legacy, and further research is necessary.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst some positive results were observed in this study, more research is necessary across a broader spectrum of sites and venues to make conclusive recommendations for architects designing for Mega Sporting events.

Social implications

The significance of this study to architectural practice, academia, and society is its potential to benefit future Olympic Games, International Olympic Committee policy, and be extended to other Mega Sporting events.

Originality/value

The originality of this research lies within its analysis of Olympic infrastructures and sustainability, of which there is a current lack of comparative studies in academic research.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2010

Ilias Kapareliotis, Anastasios Panopoulos and George G. Panigyrakis

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of the residents of Beijing for the improvement of the tourist infrastructure after the Olympic Games. The study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of the residents of Beijing for the improvement of the tourist infrastructure after the Olympic Games. The study identifies factors affecting the inhabitants' perceptions about the tourist impact of the Olympic Games, and the development of special tourist types.

Design/methodology/approach

A group of 1,000 urban Beijing residents from different districts are personally interviewed on their perceptions about Beijing as a tourist destination. Their perceptions are measured on the basis of infrastructure improvements made for the Olympic Games, and the impact these improvements will have in Beijing as a post Olympic city.

Findings

The Olympic Games improve tourist infrastructure according to Beijing residents. Infrastructure for the Olympic Games affects the economic development of the Olympic city, as well as the touristic development of the city. The above mentioned factors lead to three clusters of residents, namely the eco tourism supporters, the linked tourism supporters, and the mainstream tourism supporters. These three groups with different characteristics are responsible for tourist improvement, additionally to the development of new tourist models mostly related to the Olympic Games infrastructure.

Practical implications

The improvement of tourist infrastructure in an Olympic City will attract different types of tourists who are not attached only to sports. Tourists interested in culture, in eco‐tourism, in linked tourism, and in mainstream tourism will also be attracted by an Olympic City. The outcomes of the study can be used by future Olympic cities in order to improve their image as a tourist destination.

Originality value

There is limited research related to the impacts of the Olympic Games into the tourist industry. The present study identifies the impact of the Olympic infrastructure to different types of tourism. Different clusters of residents will provide valuable insights related to tourism stemming from the Olympic infrastructure.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Christer Persson

The interest for hosting the Olympic Games is now at its historical peak. Heads of states, culture elites, top athletes and professional marketers are engaged in selling…

Abstract

The interest for hosting the Olympic Games is now at its historical peak. Heads of states, culture elites, top athletes and professional marketers are engaged in selling their cities to the deciding International Olympic Committee. This host selection process has recently been in the focus of public interest due to the bribery allegations against the winner of the 2002 Olympic Winter Games, Salt Lake City.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 55 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Peter Knight, Ina Freeman, Stephen Stuart, Gerald Griggs and Norm O’Reilly

– The purpose of this paper is to review Olympic mascots in the electronic and traditional communications environments.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review Olympic mascots in the electronic and traditional communications environments.

Design/methodology/approach

Olympic mascots from 2006 to 2012 are analyzed using a descriptive semiotic analysis technique.

Findings

Results found that none of the 2006-2012 mascots clearly represented the two most recognizable icons of the Olympic movement, the Olympic Rings and the Olympic Flame. The association of the London 2012 mascots with the Olympic Games are found to be limited.

Research limitations/implications

This research sets the stage for a number of future studies to further assess the management issues, social benefits, and potential missteps regarding mascots at the Olympic Games and other mega-events.

Practical implications

The practitioner of today working for a mega-event like the Olympic Games needs to be aware of the potential benefits and inherent risks of developing and implementing a mascot.

Originality/value

This research is the first to look specifically at Olympic mascots in the electronic age and contrast their use to traditional communications.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Ioannis Minis, Marion Paraschi and Apostolos Tzimourtas

This paper aims to focus on the design of the organization, processes, and systems of Olympic logistics.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the design of the organization, processes, and systems of Olympic logistics.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic methodology has been developed to design the strategy and tactics of logistics operations for the Athens 2004 Olympic Games. This methodology considers Olympic‐specific characteristics, host country characteristics, as well as lessons learned from previous games. It comprises the generation, analysis and evaluation of strategic alternatives, the development of core business processes and the prediction of resource requirements. Furthermore, the proposed method provides guidelines to complement the experiential knowledge that has been used exclusively in the past to plan the logistics operations of the games and similar large‐scale events.

Findings

Successful design principles, such as model venue planning, standardization of materials, the establishment of the Logistics Command Center (LCC), as well as establishment of an independent administration function, can be applied regardless of the specific characteristics of the host country. However, there are principles such as outsourcing, warehousing, or just‐in‐time (JIT) deliveries, that are based on certain specific characteristics (constraints/advantages) of the host country, such as a mature 3PL market, the existence and availability of large warehouses, and the completion of the venues in sufficient time prior to the beginning of the games.

Practical implications

The proposed design process provides generic rules that may be applied to guide the set up of operations for future games. Furthermore, the paper offers some useful insights applicable to the logistics of large events.

Originality/value

It is the first time that a systematic view of Olympic logistics is dealt with, as opposed to experiential knowledge with local applicability that has been used in the past to plan similar operations.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Qiang (Steven) Lu and Yupin Yang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games on the residential real estate markets of the host city during the bidding, pre-Olympic

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games on the residential real estate markets of the host city during the bidding, pre-Olympic and post-Olympic periods.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a difference-in-differences model to analyze the transaction prices for all properties in New South Wales, Australia for the period from 1980 to 2007.

Findings

The paper finds that the impact on real estate markets varies across different suburbs in the host city and over time. The real estate markets of host suburbs experience substantially higher growth during the bidding and pre-Olympic periods but not during the post-Olympic period. However, the property prices in non-host suburbs in the host city increase at a higher rate during the pre- and post-Olympic periods but not during the bidding period.

Originality/value

This study offers insights into the long-term impact of the Olympic Games on host suburbs and non-host suburbs in the host city during different periods by analyzing a large longitudinal data set over a period of 27 years.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000