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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Oluwole Alfred Olatunji, Jane Jia Suen Lee, Heap-Yih Chong and Abiola Abosede Akanmu

This study investigates building information modelling (BIM) penetration in quantity surveying (QS) practice by examining the significance attached to the benefits and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates building information modelling (BIM) penetration in quantity surveying (QS) practice by examining the significance attached to the benefits and barriers of BIM adoption, BIM capabilities and future directions of BIM in QS processes. A popular opinion amongst construction researchers is that BIM has the capacity to revolutionize the industry. The study draws-out information in the literature regarding discipline-specific penetration of BIM.

Design/methodology/approach

Snowball sampling method was used to obtain information through a survey questionnaire. A total of 73 participants, largely quantity surveyors in Western Australia, took part in the study. Reductionist methodology was used to identify key variables of QS-BIM competencies that are most significant statistically.

Findings

BIM does not impose additional difficulties to traditional QS processes. Adherence to standard method of measurement and limited market demand do not hinder BIM deployment significantly. Quantity surveyors are able to use BIM to support their professional services once definitive design models are involved. In addition, the study identifies BIM penetration barriers to include constraints caused by centralised database management and interoperability issues, limitations imposed by market drivers, lack of in-house expertise to manage modelling needs and limited capability in software management.

Practical implications

Future opportunities for skill development are in the areas noted in the findings. Whilst many studies have reported resistance and widespread scepticism amongst some construction disciplines regarding BIM adoption, this study finds BIM penetration in QS practice is considerable, a direction that could trigger further novel innovations.

Originality/value

The methodology reported in the study is novel. In addition, findings from the study inspires other discipline-specific studies to articulate their BIM-penetration trends so that t broad areas of construction can develop a balanced strategy around BIM and innovation development.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 21 April 2020

Hamidreza Karami and Oluwole Alfred Olatunji

Delay causations in infrastructure projects are well reported in normative literature. However, very little is known regarding the environment-related causations which can…

Abstract

Purpose

Delay causations in infrastructure projects are well reported in normative literature. However, very little is known regarding the environment-related causations which can assist in developing mitigation strategies. This study aims to examine critical causations of overruns in marine construction projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 73 delay factors, grouped into 16 themes, were identified from literature. Data relating to the significance of each factor were collected through a questionnaire survey administered to 151 respondents. A total number of 126 valid responses were retrieved. Reductionist methodology was used to identify the statistical significance of each delay causation.

Findings

All 73 variables analysed in the study are significant, including communication issues amongst stakeholders, inadequate planning, safety issues, deficient technical instructions and inappropriate management approaches. Others include design and construction issues, issues with project organisational structures, political and cultural factors, environmental uncertainties and complexity in resource management. The study also found estimation errors, owner's attitude, financial issues, delay in approval processes, construction strategies and unavailability of appropriate technologies for the work as influencing factors. These findings are consistent with earlier studies on other forms of projects, but they further confirm that they are very relevant to marine projects.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the diversity of marine projects, overrun factors are likely to manifest in different ways in varying project circumstances. In addition, economics, technologies and local legislation often influence project situations differently.

Practical implications

The implications of these findings will assist in growing the practicality of scheduling and contract administration theories in marine projects. Although delay causations that have been reported in normative literature are relevant to marine construction, however, some of the causations are more severe in marine projects. It is important that planners and project stakeholders are mindful of this such that they can develop their expectations to tolerate variability rather than trade impracticable blames.

Originality/value

Determining delay factors specific to marine construction projects assists stakeholders and project management community in developing dedicated strategies applicable in scheduling to prevent and correct obstructions caused by overruns. Since projects are different in types and sizes, delay observations cannot be generalised.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2018

Oluwole Alfred Olatunji, Adenike Omolabake Orundami and Oluwatomi Ogundare

A section of project management literature attributes overruns to estimators’ deceit and delusion. An example of this is Flyvbjerg’s theorisation of strategic…

Abstract

Purpose

A section of project management literature attributes overruns to estimators’ deceit and delusion. An example of this is Flyvbjerg’s theorisation of strategic misrepresentation and optimism bias. To show that such a notion is not true entirely, the study elicits evidence relating to how costs of projects often fluctuate erratically as prices of construction materials change throughout contract cycle times. The purpose of this paper is to examine the causal relationships between persistent changes in prices of construction materials and project’s outturn costs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors obtained and analysed price data of construction materials published in a Nigerian national daily in the 16 years between 2000 and 2015. Additional data were obtained from a quantity surveying firm to validate the archival data on material prices, and to compare the firm’s robust database of project estimates and the corresponding outturn costs of specific building elements (detailed in the study). The goal of the analysis is to explore spontaneity and causal impact in the relationship between changes in prices of construction materials and project costs. Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling tests were used to obtain the probability distributions of the causal relationships.

Findings

Findings show disproportionate positive correlations between changes in material prices and outturn costs in Nigeria. An important dimension to this, however, is that although fluctuations in material costs often trigger variations to project costs, outturn price only accounts for about one-third of actual cost variability. Recovery of costs, not least profit making, under these conditions is a complex process.

Originality/value

This paper concludes that dynamism in cost attributes is neither a deceit nor a delusion; understanding and tolerating them is not a systemic weakness, rather an essential key to project success and stakeholder satisfaction. Findings from the study also bring measured certainties to the transformation of variable costs into fixed price outcomes, an important consideration that will help contract estimators and project managers to understand the likelihood of fluctuation in material costs and how these might trigger variability in project costs.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Olaniyi Isaac Aje, Oluwole Alfred Olatunji and Olanrewaju Augustine Olalusi

Evidence suggests project owners could use advance payments to prevent cost escalations. The purpose of this paper is to elicit the relationships between causations of…

Abstract

Purpose

Evidence suggests project owners could use advance payments to prevent cost escalations. The purpose of this paper is to elicit the relationships between causations of overruns when advance payments are issued to contractors.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 97 responses from a questionnaire survey were analysed. Additional data on 51 projects, completed between 2000 and 2014 under different advance payments regimes, were also obtained and analysed.

Findings

Project owners issue advance payments to contractors so as to avoid delays. However, statistical correlation between advance payments and overrun causations are not significant. Although cost overruns were higher in large projects than in small projects, schedule overruns were more in small projects than in large projects. Schedule overruns were caused most significantly by contractors’ site management approaches. Design and documentation issues were identified as the most prevalent cause of cost overruns. Regression models are proposed to elicit overruns when advance payments are issued.

Practical implications

Extant debates on project overruns in construction and project management literature are robust. Nonetheless, the study elicits considerable knowledge gaps regarding the roles of advance payments in fostering project performance.

Originality/value

This pioneering work indexes the relationship between advance payment and project overruns in Nigeria. It is also the first attempt to document the probability distribution of overruns in Nigeria, particularly under specific advance payment regimes.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 23 April 2019

Oluwole Alfred Olatunji

Industry uptake of digital modeling is improving. Recent evidence suggests building information modeling (BIM) is the commercial reality of today’s construction education…

Abstract

Purpose

Industry uptake of digital modeling is improving. Recent evidence suggests building information modeling (BIM) is the commercial reality of today’s construction education, and the way of the future that has truly begun. Amongst the significance of this is BIM’s potential to revolutionize the industry. The purpose of this paper is to use the learning experiences of undergraduate students in two construction management subjects involving quantity measurement and cost estimation to explore students’ motivation toward BIM education. In particular, the study investigates decision factors underlying students’ selection of software for information management in a modeling environment.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 674 undergraduate students from the same institution were surveyed, out of which 153 responses were retrieved. The data provide insights into decisions taken by students while metamorphosing traditional processes into BIM-driven outcomes, in the form of commercial estimates of a real life project reported through a bill of quantities. Some 29 decision factors were analyzed. These include prior training, flair for creativity, ease of use, economic reasons, learning outcomes, on-going technical support and support infrastructure. Reductionist methods involving factor analysis and Cronbach’s α reliability estimate procedures were used to investigate the most important decision factors from amongst the decision factors analyzed.

Findings

Results show all the 29 decision factors are statistically significant. Access to on-going support, the mandatory requirement to use a particular tool to complete an assessment task and the requirement to use the tool for job duties are the most significant decision factors. Vendors’ persuasion and the capability of the tool to achieve better outcomes than others are least significant. Statistical correlations between the decision factors were obtained. They all suggest near-absolute correlations.

Practical implications

The practical implications of these findings are vital. They help to unravel factors that promote students’ interest in BIM education, and contribute toward the development of software selection models that are relevant to professionals and incipient businesses.

Originality/value

Future studies on decision analysis can be built on the findings also. In particular, the decision factors help in developing creative cognitive solutions to BIM adoption issues. They also help on the challenge posed by the constraints of knowledge diffusion within and across project teams, and in designing tools that meet the requirements of non-design disciplines who also play vital roles in the BIM project environment.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Omobolanle Ogunseiju, Johnson Olayiwola, Abiola Akanmu and Oluwole Alfred Olatunji

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders constitute a severe problem in the construction industry. Workers' lower backs are often affected by heavy or repetitive lifting and…

Abstract

Purpose

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders constitute a severe problem in the construction industry. Workers' lower backs are often affected by heavy or repetitive lifting and prolonged awkward postures. Exoskeletal interventions are effective for tasks involving manual lifting and repetitive movements. This study aims to examine the potential of a postural-assist exoskeleton (a passive exoskeleton) for manual material handling tasks.

Design/methodology/approach

From an experimental observation of participants, the effects of postural-assist exoskeleton on tasks and workers were measured. Associated benefits of the exoskeleton were assessed through task performance, range of motion and discomfort.

Findings

Findings suggest that the exoskeleton influenced discomfort significantly, however range of motion decreased with lifting tasks. The reduced back flexion and increased hip flexion were also indicatives of the participants' responsiveness to the feedback from the exoskeleton. In addition, task completion time increased by 20%, and participants' back pain did not reduce.

Research limitations/implications

The work tasks were performed in a controlled laboratory environment and only wearable inertia measurement units (IMUs) were used to assess the risk exposures of the body parts.

Practical implications

This study opens a practical pathway to human-exoskeleton integration, artificial regeneration or enablement of impaired workforce and a window toward a new order of productivity scaling. Results from this study provide preliminary insights to designers and innovators on the influence of postural assist exoskeleton on construction work. Project stakeholders can be informed of the suitability of the postural assist exoskeletons for manual material handling tasks.

Originality/value

Little has been reported on the benefits and impact of exoskeletons on tasks' physical demands and construction workers' performance. This study adds value to the existing literature, in particular by providing insights into the effectiveness and consequences of the postural-assist exoskeleton for manual material handling tasks.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2020

Abiola Akanmu, Johnson Olayiwola and Oluwole Alfred Olatunji

Carpenters are constantly vulnerable to musculoskeletal disorders. Their work consists of subtasks that promote nonfatal injuries and pains that affect different body…

Abstract

Purpose

Carpenters are constantly vulnerable to musculoskeletal disorders. Their work consists of subtasks that promote nonfatal injuries and pains that affect different body segments. The purpose of this study is to examine ergonomic exposures of carpentry subtasks involved in floor framing, how they lead to musculoskeletal injuries, and how preventive and protective interventions around them can be effective.

Design/methodology/approach

Using wearable sensors, this study characterizes ergonomic exposures of carpenters by measuring and analyzing body movement data relating to major subtasks in carpentry flooring work. The exposures are assessed using Postural Ergonomic Risk Assessment classification, which is based on tasks involving repetitive subtasks and nonstatic postures.

Findings

The findings of this paper suggest severe risk impositions on the trunk, shoulder and elbow as a result of the measuring and marking and cutting out vent locations, as well as in placing and nailing boards into place.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the type and size of wearable sensor used, only results of risk exposures of four body-parts are presented.

Practical implications

This study draws insights on how to benchmark trade-specific measurement of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Safety efforts can be targeted toward these risk areas and subtasks. Specifically, results from these will assist designers and innovators in designing effective and adaptable protective interventions and safety trainings.

Originality/value

Extant studies have failed to provide adequate evidence regarding the relationships between subtasks and musculoskeletal disorders; they have only mimicked construction tasks through laboratory experimental scenarios. This study adds value to the existing literature, in particular by providing insights into hazards associated with floor carpentry subtasks.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Oluwole Alfred Olatunji, Olaniyi Isaac Aje and Sina Makanjuola

The decision to bid or not to bid for new projects determines contractors’ propensity for business success or failure. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The decision to bid or not to bid for new projects determines contractors’ propensity for business success or failure. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that affect the decision of indigenous construction contractors to bid or not to bid in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis was conducted on data from questionnaires received from 64 engineering management employees of leading construction companies which are members of Nigeria’s Federation of Construction Industry. The study identified 41 significant decision factors often considered by Nigerian indigenous contractors before the bid. Mean item scores were obtained for each of the factors. Principal component analysis was used to point out the most significant decision factors.

Findings

Results revealed significant orthogonal relationships between the factors. Only 11 of the 41 factors are statistically significant to influence contractors’ decision to bid or not to bid. Most of the significant items were amongst the least rated items by the participants. The post hoc decision factors include consultant’s interpretation of project specifications, previous relationship between the intending bidder and client, availability of other projects at the time of bidding, technological complexity of the project under consideration and prequalification requirements. Others include the propensity for resource price fluctuation, business capacity of partners, amount of own work vs subcontracted work, required rate of return on investment and difficulty in obtaining finance.

Originality/value

The practical implication of these findings are as follows: the orthogonal relationship between the decision factors implies non-linear relationship between the factors and actual decision to bid or not to bid, and that bid success is often not predictable by bid behaviour; many of the bid decision factors rated highest by indigenous contractors seldom impact the contractors’ actual bid decisions; local and international players can adopt the significant decision factors elicited in this study for managing their structures for inter-organizational partnerships.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Oluwole Alfred Olatunji and Willy Sher

The purpose of this paper is to elicit the activities in geometric 3D computer-aided design (CAD) estimating. Construction estimators usually target the structural…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to elicit the activities in geometric 3D computer-aided design (CAD) estimating. Construction estimators usually target the structural integrity of data underlying project designs while measuring quantities and developing estimates. However, there are different ways to this. There is considerable evidence to suggest substantial distinction between data structuring in geometric and parametric CAD (building information modelling). Each of these platforms also appeals to estimators in the various practice domains differently. Regardless, the developments in the use of geometric and parametric CAD for design and management purposes have been rapid.

Design/methodology/approach

The study focuses on the various perspectives within the different construction business domains. Interviews, focus group discussions and direct observation methods were used to explore data on estimating activities in 3D CAD from two public organizations, two large contracting firms, two quantity surveying consulting practices, two specialist-project companies and four software development and vending firms. These involved 17 middle-top management estimators who have had extensive experience in the industry. As the activities were elicited, participants were able to ascribe relative importance to each of the activities, and these were logically compared across the different practice domains.

Findings

Thirty-one activities were identified as the components of estimators’ procedures leading to reliable outcomes in estimating 3D CAD designs. Logical correlations were discussed through extant literature towards forming a centroid model which could be used for numerous industry applications, including software development, knowledge transfer between organizations, employees’ hands-on training, curriculum design for academic institutions and as a policy framework for professional institutions on estimating practice. Further areas of research were also highlighted.

Originality/value

This work is an original piece. It is neither published nor under consideration elsewhere.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Oluwole Alfred Olatunji and Abiola Akanmu

Building information modelling (BIM) offers a new direction of project implementation. It promotes integration of multiple lifecycle stages as well as multidisciplinary…

Abstract

Purpose

Building information modelling (BIM) offers a new direction of project implementation. It promotes integration of multiple lifecycle stages as well as multidisciplinary integration; whereas conventional approaches are primed on fragmentation. The purpose of this paper is to add to existing debates on the relationship between the rationality of the legal structures underlying fragmented project delivery and BIM’s ability to successfully foster integration across different lifecycle stages. A step further from extant arguments on whether BIM could be sufficiently serviced by the same legal provisions that had serviced fragmented relationships, the study opens up some new fronts regarding the consequences of shared trusts and reciprocity in an integrated project platform.

Design/methodology/approach

In addition to a deep analysis of traditional literature on BIM and project management, the study draws its strength from two recent court cases on the limitations of disclaimers against breaches. It also targets court decisions on consequential loss and the duty of care to explain project team’s liabilities when BIM could not live to its theorized promises.

Findings

The study shows that disclaimers are a weak protection against liabilities. As BIM offers a dynamic project environment, the study relies on decided cases to show that duty of care to a project (and its owners) is not entirely representable by prototype contract language. More importantly, the study concludes that the applications of BIM to facilities management are better supported on BIM’s new dimension of multidisciplinary integration, rather than a mere coalescing of deliverables across different lifecycle fragments.

Originality/value

This work presents a novel approach to the debate on the potentiality of BIM to drive project success. It adds to the growing discourse on the legal implications of BIM by considering the potential of digital models as a valid and admissible contract instrument.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

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