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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 February 2022

Oluseyi Julius Adebowale and Justus Ngala Agumba

Labour productivity in construction has fallen behind other industries in most of the world and has declined continuously for decades. Although several scholarly research projects…

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Abstract

Purpose

Labour productivity in construction has fallen behind other industries in most of the world and has declined continuously for decades. Although several scholarly research projects have been conducted to salvage the prevalent low labour productivity in construction, contractors in the construction industry have continued to grapple with the devastating impact of low productivity. The purpose of this study is to determine key areas of focus necessary to promote productivity growth in construction.

Design/methodology/approach

Bibliometric and scientometric assessments were conducted to map the existing construction labour productivity (CLP) studies and establish key focus areas in the research domain. The keywords “Construction Productivity” OR “Construction Labour Productivity” OR “Construction Labor Productivity” OR “Construction Worker Productivity”.

Findings

Emerging trends in the CLP research field are reported. The study also determined the most productive authors and collaboration among authors, most productive journals, most active regions and publications with the highest impact in CLP research.

Research limitations/implications

Documents published in the Scopus database were considered for analysis because of the wider coverage of the database. Journal and conference articles written in English language represent the inclusion criteria, while articles in press, review, book chapters, editorial, erratum, note, short survey and data paper were excluded from analysis. The study is also limited to documents published from 2012 to 2021.

Practical implications

The study brought to the awareness of the industry practitioners and other construction stakeholders, the key knowledge areas that are critical to promoting productivity growth in construction.

Originality/value

Except bibliometric analysis, previous research studies have used different approaches to investigate productivity in construction. The study presented future research directions through the emerging knowledge areas identified in the study.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 72 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2023

Oluseyi Julius Adebowale and Justus Ngala Agumba

Small and medium-sized contractors are critical to micro and macroeconomic performance. These contractors in South Africa have long been confronted with the problem of business…

Abstract

Purpose

Small and medium-sized contractors are critical to micro and macroeconomic performance. These contractors in South Africa have long been confronted with the problem of business failure because of a plethora of factors, including poor productivity. The purpose of this study is to investigate salient issues undermining the productivity of small and medium-sized contractors in South Africa. This study proposes alternative possibilities to engender productivity improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected using semi-structured interviews with 15 contractors in Gauteng Province, South Africa. The research data were analysed using content and causal layered analyses.

Findings

Challenges to contractors’ productivity were associated with inadequately skilled workers, management competence and political factors. Skills development, construction business and political factors were dominant stakeholders’ perceptions. Metaphors for construction labour productivity are presented and reconstructed as alternative directions for productivity improvement.

Practical implications

Contractors lose a substantial amount of South African Rand to poor productivity. Alternative directions provided in this study can be leveraged to increase profitability in construction organizations, enhance the social well-being of South Africans and ultimately improve the contribution of contractors to the South African economy.

Originality/value

The causal layered analysis (CLA) applied in this study is novel to construction labour productivity research. The four connected layers of CLA, which make a greater depth of inquiry possible, were explored to investigate labour productivity in construction organizations.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2023

Oluseyi Julius Adebowale and Justus Ngala Agumba

The United Nations has demonstrated a commitment to preserving the ecosystem through its 2030 sustainable development goals agenda. One crucial objective of these goals is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The United Nations has demonstrated a commitment to preserving the ecosystem through its 2030 sustainable development goals agenda. One crucial objective of these goals is to promote a healthy ecosystem and discourage practices that harm it. Building materials production significantly contributes to the emissions of greenhouse gases. This poses a threat to the ecosystem and prompts a growing demand for sustainable building materials (SBMs). The purpose of this study is to investigate SBMs to determine their utilization in construction operations and the potential impact their application could have on construction productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of the existing literature in the field of SBMs was conducted for the study. The search strings used were “sustainable” AND (“building” OR “construction”) AND “materials” AND “productivity”. A total of 146 articles were obtained from the Scopus database and reviewed.

Findings

Bio-based, cementitious and phase change materials were the main categories of SBMs. Materials in these categories have the potential to substantially contribute to sustainability in the construction sector. However, challenges such as availability, cost, expertise, awareness, social acceptance and resistance to innovation must be addressed to promote the increased utilization of SBMs and enhance construction productivity.

Originality/value

Many studies have explored SBMs, but there is a dearth of studies that address productivity in the context of SBMs, which leaves a gap in understanding. This study addresses this gap by drawing on existing studies to determine the potential implications that using SBMs could have on construction productivity.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2022

Oluseyi Julius Adebowale and Justus Ngala Agumba

Despite the significance of the construction industry to the nation's economic growth, there is empirical evidence that the sector is lagging behind other industries in terms of…

4951

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the significance of the construction industry to the nation's economic growth, there is empirical evidence that the sector is lagging behind other industries in terms of productivity growth. The need for improvements inspired the industry's stakeholders to consider using emerging technologies that support the enhancement. This research aims to report augmented reality applications essential for contractors' productivity improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

This study systematically reviewed academic journals. The selection of journal articles entailed searching Scopus and Web of Science databases. Relevant articles for reviews were identified and screened. Content analysis was used to classify key applications into six categories. The research results were limited to journal articles published between 2010 and 2021.

Findings

Augmented reality can improve construction productivity through its applications in assembly, training and education, monitoring and controlling, interdisciplinary function, health and safety and design information.

Originality/value

The research provides a direction for contractors on key augmented reality applications they can leverage to improve their organisations' productivity.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 27 June 2023

Kabir Ibrahim, Fredrick Simpeh and Oluseyi Julius Adebowale

Technologies have had a positive impact on the construction industry. Technologies such as BIM, automation, augmented and virtual reality, Internet of Things and robotics have…

1104

Abstract

Purpose

Technologies have had a positive impact on the construction industry. Technologies such as BIM, automation, augmented and virtual reality, Internet of Things and robotics have been adopted by construction firms to enhance productivity. However, not much research has been done on the awareness and adoption of wearable technologies for health and safety (H&S) management. This paper investigates the level of awareness and adoption of wearable technologies for H&S management in the Nigerian construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research method was adopted for the study. An electronic questionnaire format was used as an instrument to collect the data. Both descriptive (mean score) and inferential statistics (Kruskal–Wallis test) were used to analyse the data.

Findings

The results indicate that organisations rarely use H&S wearable devices for H&S management although professionals within the construction industry are somewhat aware of the common H&S wearable devices. The findings further indicate that all 11 variables were perceived as “rarely adopted”, whereas 2 variables were perceived as “aware”, 3 variables as “slightly aware” and the remaining 6 variables as “somewhat aware”.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from only construction professionals working in government agencies, consultancy firms and grade D contracting firms in Lagos and Abuja. For a broader perspective, a study that expands the number of states and categories of construction firms is recommended.

Practical implications

The construction industry in Nigeria can use the recommendations to improve H&S management on site. Moreover, the recommendations can contribute to the development of policies to promote the adoption of wearable technologies in construction sites.

Originality/value

Research on wearable technologies, particularly in the Nigerian construction industry, is at the developing stage. With this article, the authors contribute to the body of knowledge in this area of research.

Details

Frontiers in Engineering and Built Environment, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-2499

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2021

Oluseyi Julius Adebowale and Justus Ngala Agumba

The global construction industry is significant to economic development, whereas the sector, particularly its small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) have continued to suffer…

Abstract

Purpose

The global construction industry is significant to economic development, whereas the sector, particularly its small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) have continued to suffer from low labour productivity for decades. This has given rise to the concern of relevant construction stakeholders on the need to address the challenges undermining labour productivity growth in construction. Hence, this study aims to conduct a meta-data analysis of factors that hamper productivity growth of construction SMEs in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of existing studies relative to factors affecting construction labour productivity (CLP) is presented. Thereafter, eight developing countries-based studies that are specific to SMEs were selected for meta-data analysis using relative importance index values from the studies.

Findings

The essential productivity influencing factors were identified and quantitative data of the selected studies were synthesised. The effect summaries derived from the meta-data analysis revealed that the most significant factors that negatively affect CLP amongst SMEs include: workers’ skills, inadequate training, rework, management style and incentive to labour.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to scientifically analysed secondary data relative to SME contractors in developing countries.

Practical implications

The findings of the study can be adopted by construction stakeholders to evolve productivity growth policies for construction SMEs in developing countries.

Originality/value

Synthesis of quantitative data of different studies has lent deeper insight into a more realistic and scientific precision of factors affecting labour productivity of construction SMEs.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2023

Kabir Ibrahim, Fredrick Simpeh and Oluseyi Julius Adebowale

Construction organizations must maintain a productive workforce without sacrificing their health and safety. The global construction sector loses billions of dollars yearly to…

4368

Abstract

Purpose

Construction organizations must maintain a productive workforce without sacrificing their health and safety. The global construction sector loses billions of dollars yearly to poor health and safety practices. This study aims to investigate benefits derivable from using wearable technologies to improve construction health and safety. The study also reports the challenges associated with adopting wearable technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a quantitative design, administering close-ended questions to professionals in the Nigerian construction industry. The research data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics.

Findings

The study found that the critical areas construction organizations can benefit from using WSDs include slips and trips, sensing environmental concerns, collision avoidance, falling from a high level and electrocution. However, key barriers preventing the organizations from adopting wearable technologies are related to cost, technology and human factors.

Practical implications

The time and cost lost to H&S incidents in the Nigerian construction sector can be reduced by implementing the report of this study.

Originality/value

Studies on WSDs have continued to increase in developed countries, but Nigeria is yet to experience a leap in the research area. This study provides insights into the Nigerian reality to provide directions for practice and theory.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Patricia Omega Kukoyi, Fredrick Simpeh, Oluseyi Julius Adebowale and Justus Ngala Agumba

The novel COVID-19 pandemic has increased the risk in construction operations. New systems are, thus, required on construction sites to mitigate the risk and challenges associated…

Abstract

Purpose

The novel COVID-19 pandemic has increased the risk in construction operations. New systems are, thus, required on construction sites to mitigate the risk and challenges associated with the pandemic. This paper aims to determine construction organisations risk control systems and the challenges of implementing safety measures on construction sites.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative research method. A purposive sampling method was used to select study participants, who were administered open-ended questionnaires designed to gather qualitative data. The contents of the data were analysed, presented and reported based on the objectives of the study.

Findings

Some of the construction organisations conducted COVID-19 related risk assessments, whilst a few organisations did not conduct a risk assessment. Inspections to ensure COVID-19 compliance was done by government officials, health organisations and client’s health and safety officers. The construction organisations demonstrated considerable competence in record keeping and some organisations further evolved a follow-up plan for sick workers. The study found that some construction practitioners had misconceptions about the disease, used COVID-19 personal protective equipment incorrectly and lack adequate information about the virus. It is required that construction stakeholders evolve policies and strategies that would promote risk control and foster compliance to COVID-19 safety measures.

Originality/value

COVID-19 is still new, therefore, the body of knowledge is still at the infancy stage. This paper provided insight into the COVID-19 related risk and challenges that may increase the rate of virus infection amongst construction practitioners.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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