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Article

Dev Jani and Heesup Han

This study aimed at investigating factors that contribute to increasing full‐service restaurant customers' behavioral intentions. Unlike previous research, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed at investigating factors that contribute to increasing full‐service restaurant customers' behavioral intentions. Unlike previous research, this study integrated both affective and cognitive contributors to customer satisfaction and relationship quality in explaining customers' behavioral intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained through a questionnaire survey of full‐service restaurant customers in a selected US metropolitan area. The data were subjected to structural equation modeling through the AMOS 5 program.

Findings

Among the nine hypothesized paths, six were supported and three new paths were included to improve the model fit. Affect is noted to be a major contributor to both customer satisfaction and behavioral intentions. Customer satisfaction is a direct antecedent to trust but indirect to commitment. Noteworthy is the direct impact of service encounter performance on customer satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Despite making use of a sample drawn from only a few selected areas and employing some constructs that are liable to expansion, the study has implications for the hospitality industry from both the theoretical and practical points of view.

Originality/value

This study reappraises the contributors to behavioral intentions in restaurant settings, providing valuable insight to managers on attracting and satisfying their customers.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Oliver Yu

The concepts of real options analysis, which transfer options analysis for financial investments to those involving real properties, such as land and plant facilities…

Abstract

Purpose

The concepts of real options analysis, which transfer options analysis for financial investments to those involving real properties, such as land and plant facilities, have already existed for 30 years. However, the actual application of real options analysis to technology portfolio planning has not been as widespread as expected. Among others, a major barrier to such applications appears to be a lack of appreciation and acceptance of real options by technology executives. This case study aims to present a successful application experience of real options analysis to technology portfolio planning and highlights the lessons learned in overcoming such lack of acceptance and other barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a case study approach. The methodology focuses on describing the key issues and solutions for applying real options analysis in the technology portfolio‐planning process of a company.

Findings

The findings in this paper showed that considerable barriers exist in the acceptance of real options analysis for technology portfolio planning. However, the experience in the case study provides successful approaches for overcoming these barriers.

Originality/value

The paper shows that few studies are available on the difficulties of introducing real options analysis in practical applications. This paper provides a valuable case study for such applications.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article

Hong‐Youl Ha, Swinder Janda and Siva K. Muthaly

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the satisfaction consequences in repurchase situations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the satisfaction consequences in repurchase situations.

Design/methodology/approach

Online travel services are chosen because customers in these types of services had direct contact with firms. A conceptual model of CS‐RPI link is developed and used to test proposed hypotheses. A total of 514 respondents are used to test the proposed model.

Findings

The empirical findings indicate that psychological mediators are useful when repurchase situations are considered. The study provides the roles of positive attitude in the formation of CS‐RPI link. Also, three factors: adjusted expectations, trust, and positive attitude, are found to have a significant mediating influence on the link of CS‐RPI.

Research limitations/implications

Future researchers attempting to replicate and extend these findings may wish to collaborate with companies marketing products and services online and track customers' actual behaviors. This would be an excellent way to validate the current model relationships, particularly those involving repurchase intentions and customer satisfaction.

Practical implications

The results can be used by web site designers to tailor their sites' features and marketing analysts to monitor the changes of click‐through rates as a parameter of the CS‐RPI. The discovery of significant interrelationships between satisfaction and trust, such as adjusted expectation, positive attitude and repurchase intention, reinforces the importance of the psychological state when repurchasing behavior is considered. For instance, it was observed that the three mediators result in lower levels of the indirect effect, but this is not limited in the whole process of the CS‐RPI.

Originality/value

The conceptual framework is tested in an understudied e‐service context that is characterized by consumer‐focused competition. This context is noteworthy because no research has investigated determinants between the two parties. Research suggests that companies should understand how to capture determinants on post‐satisfaction, since competing businesses are only a mouse‐click away in e‐commerce settings.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article

Kun Song, Ann Marie Fiore and Jihye Park

The purpose of this paper is to explore the roles of telepresence and fantasy in an online apparel shopping experience. Online apparel consumers undergo a virtual product…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the roles of telepresence and fantasy in an online apparel shopping experience. Online apparel consumers undergo a virtual product experience (telepresence) that simulates the product experience in a brick‐and‐mortar store. Fantasy entails the pleasurable mental imagery involving product use.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 86 female university students completed a survey after browsing a stimulus web site in a laboratory setting. Path analysis was used to identify hypothesized relationships between telepresence, fantasy, shopping enjoyment, willingness to purchase, and willingness to patronize the online retailer.

Findings

Results showed that telepresence influenced consumer fantasy and both telepresence and consumer fantasy led to shopping enjoyment (experiential value). Telepresence, fantasy, and shopping enjoyment directly contributed to willingness to purchase from the online retailer, whereas telepresence, fantasy and shopping enjoyment contributed indirectly to willingness to patronize the online retailer.

Research limitations/implications

The study used a sample of female university students in the USA. This limits its generalizability to all consumers. It also examined one web site feature; other features may produce different effects.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that business practitioners implement features on their web sites to yield telepresence and fantasy, which may enhance purchase and patronage responses towards their site.

Originality/value

This study enhances understanding of two variables requiring further study, telepresence and fantasy, in online apparel shopping experience.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article

Nina K. Prebensen and Sara Rosengren

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative importance of dimensions of experience value in four different hedonic- and utilitarian-dominated services.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative importance of dimensions of experience value in four different hedonic- and utilitarian-dominated services.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed hypotheses are tested by an experimental design. Altogether, four different service experiences, taking place during a tourist weekend trip, were studied using a scenario-based approach. In total, 938 members of a nationally representative online panel in Sweden participated in the research.

Findings

Both hedonic and utilitarian value dimensions are present for the different experiences. However, the structures of the value dimensions differ between hedonic- and utilitarian-dominant services. Surprisingly, functional value and value for money influence satisfaction most for both categories of services.

Research limitations/implications

The design of the experiment allowed the authors to test different experiences within the same travel setting. The paper shows that all services include both hedonic and utilitarian elements, indicating awareness of what attracts tourists during the whole process of experiencing a journey. Findings suggest that further studies on different hedonic- and utilitarian-dominant firms within the different tourism service categories should be performed.

Originality/value

Theoretically, the paper only partly confirms the two structures of consumer service value, hedonic and utilitarian, revealed in earlier studies. The paper also reveals that functional value affects satisfaction more strongly in both hedonic- and utilitarian-dominant services. Several explanations for this are suggested. For the tourism industry to enhance experience value and tourist satisfaction, they should, therefore, focus on delivering functional value during the stay and probably more on emotional value in attracting visitors to travel. Results of the paper reveal that services are a part of a continuum between what is mostly utilitarian at the one end and mostly hedonic at the other end.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Saju Jose, Nilesh Khare and F. Robert Buchanan

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities of the firm affect poor captive consumers’ repurchase intentions, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities of the firm affect poor captive consumers’ repurchase intentions, and whether or not CSR activities may moderate established relationships that drive repurchase intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to 201 poor microfinance borrowers at the bottom of the pyramid in India in a cross-sectional field study format. Multivariate regression is used to examine relationships between CSR and repurchase intention.

Findings

All else being the same, CSR activities aimed at the borrowers’ communities affects repurchase intentions positively even among poor captive borrowers. Further, positive perceptions of CSR to some extent mitigate the negative impact of the dissatisfaction on repurchase intentions. Unmarried borrowers, mostly female, were more moved by CSR impressions compared to their married counterparts.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could identify other aspects of demographic differences in borrowers, and capture more about attitudes toward CSR and motivations for borrowing. Longitudinal study can establish causality that cannot be inferred from this cross-sectional field study. More diverse locations and organizations would offer wider generalizability. It will be interesting to examine if poor and captive customers would care about CSR activities even when such activities are targeted at recipients unrelated to them or their communities.

Originality/value

The dynamics of CSR in poor captive consumer communities are somewhat novel. Microfinance context makes it even more so as the borrower is both a client and a recipient of CSR simultaneously. Results suggest that like well-off consumers, poor and captive customers also care about dissatisfaction and CSR.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article

Charles Hancock and Carley Foster

This paper aims to explore how the Zaltman metaphor elicitation technique (ZMET) can be adopted in services marketing to provide deeper customer experience insights.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how the Zaltman metaphor elicitation technique (ZMET) can be adopted in services marketing to provide deeper customer experience insights.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores how ZMET interviews, which use images selected by the participant to facilitate discussion, can be used by researchers. This paper draws upon a study of 24 student experiences at a UK university.

Findings

Adopting this qualitative method for services marketing can counter depth deficit when compared to other qualitative approaches, because it is participant led. However, the method requires competent interview skills and time for the interview and analysis. We find that ZMET has not been widely adopted in academia because of its commercial licenced use. The paper illustrates how to use the ZMET process step-by-step.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are limited to student experiences. Further research is necessary to understand how researchers could use ZMET in other areas of services marketing.

Practical implications

This paper provides guidance to researchers on how to use ZMET as a methodological tool. ZMET facilitates a deeper understanding of service experiences through using participant chosen images and thus enabling researchers to uncover subconscious hidden perceptions that other methods may not find.

Originality/value

ZMET has been used commercially to gain market insights but has had limited application in service research. Existing studies fail to provide details of how ZMET can be used to access the consumer subconscious. This paper makes a methodological contribution by providing step-by-step guidance on how to apply ZMET to services marketing.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article

David Martin, Martin O'Neill, Susan Hubbard and Adrian Palmer

Service quality and customer satisfaction have traditionally been conceptualised and measured using cognitive indicators. This paper aims to build on the body of…

Abstract

Purpose

Service quality and customer satisfaction have traditionally been conceptualised and measured using cognitive indicators. This paper aims to build on the body of literature that recognises the role of emotions in determining customer satisfaction and future behavioural intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The focus for this study was a football stadium in which respondents' evaluation of “off pitch” service quality was investigated in the context of emotions aroused by “on pitch” activities. A time‐elapsed three‐stage survey was used to evaluate the respondents and any changes over time.

Findings

In a survey of 407 match attendees, emotionally‐based satisfaction was found to be a better predictor of future behavioural intention than cognitive measures of satisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper establishes the need to use both emotional and cognitive measures of satisfaction when evaluating overall customer satisfaction and future behavioural intention. It also highlights the unique nature of customer satisfaction in a sporting events venue.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article

Christopher White and Yi‐Ting Yu

The purpose of this study is to develop and refine the theoretical framework underpinning consumer satisfaction emotions and re‐examine the emotions/behavioral intentions link.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop and refine the theoretical framework underpinning consumer satisfaction emotions and re‐examine the emotions/behavioral intentions link.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research design was adopted for this study. An extensive and critical review of literature related to consumer satisfaction emotions and consumer behavioral intentions led to the identification of two research questions. A self‐completion questionnaire was developed and administered to hospitality management graduates in Switzerland.

Findings

The PCA suggested that satisfaction emotions were best conceptualized as a three‐dimensional construct that included positive, negative and what the present authors have labeled “bi‐directional” emotions. Moreover, a positive statistically significant relationship between “bi‐directional” emotions and consumer complaining behavior was established through correlation analysis.

Research limitations/implications

The respondents were studying at a private institution in Switzerland, and as such, the socio‐economic background of the respondents may not be representative of education consumers generally, and of consumers of services in industries other than education.

Practical implications

The findings reported in this paper indicate that the emotions framework that was developed could provide a valuable resource for managers as segmentation tool, and as an instrument for measuring and monitoring consumer behavioral intentions.

Originality/value

This paper has identified a relationship between specific satisfaction emotions and consumer complaining behavior. As a consequence, a more comprehensive satisfaction emotions scale has been developed that captures a broader range of consumer behavioral intentions. This information should benefit practitioners and researchers alike.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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