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Case study
Publication date: 6 April 2015

Stephen E. Maiden, Gerry Yemen, Elliott N. Weiss and Oliver Wight

This case examines the queueing issues caused by the growth in popularity of one of the most visited Hindu temples in the world. On January 2, 2015, Ramesh and Vasantha…

Abstract

This case examines the queueing issues caused by the growth in popularity of one of the most visited Hindu temples in the world. On January 2, 2015, Ramesh and Vasantha Gupta visit Tirumala Venkateswara Temple, just a day after some 210,000 people crowded the 2,000-year-old site. The case describes the many enhancements that the temple administrator, Tirumala Tirupati Devasthanams (TTD), has implemented since its management of the temple complex began in 1932. The soaring popularity of the temple, however, has led to safety and comfort concerns for pilgrims. While challenging students to consider additional improvements that might benefit pilgrim throughput rate and time in the temple system, the case highlights the tension TTD must manage between maximizing efficiency and maintaining religious traditions. Additionally, the case demonstrates the importance of perceived waiting times in the management of queues.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Case study
Publication date: 8 December 2014

Rebecca Goldberg, Tim Kraft, Elliott Weiss and Oliver Wight

Joe Smith, senior director of merchandise management at Beautiful Bags (BB), was about to place a large order for the upcoming winter season. He had to decide how many…

Abstract

Joe Smith, senior director of merchandise management at Beautiful Bags (BB), was about to place a large order for the upcoming winter season. He had to decide how many pieces he should order of each product. But another big question whether BB should source the product from its domestic manufacturing facility, its Chinese suppliers, or some combination of the two given the timing needs, labor costs, minimum order requirements, and BB's expanding product assortment?

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Case study
Publication date: 10 February 2016

Stephen Maiden, Case Writer, Gerry Yemen, Elliott N. Weiss and Oliver Wight

The strategic and tactical problems of managing the operations function in a service environment can be examined through the context of the Walt Disney Company (DIS…

Abstract

The strategic and tactical problems of managing the operations function in a service environment can be examined through the context of the Walt Disney Company (DIS) opening Shanghai Disneyland. The company and its investors were excited about the Shanghai opening for a good reason: demographics. The resort would be located in the Pudong district of Shanghai, easily the wealthiest of all of China’s districts. A massive 330 million people lived with a three-hour driving radius of the resort site, compared with 19.6 million who lived within the same radius at DIS’s most profitable park, Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida. Still, risks remained. Construction complications had delayed the opening almost a year longer than expected and cost overruns and alterations had increased the final price tag of the project. The Chinese economy had also hit a rough patch following the Chinese stock market slump in the summer of 2015. With the world watching, could the classic Disney theme park experience be delivered with the right cultural balance to appeal to its largely Chinese customers? Could DIS get it right?

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Case study
Publication date: 5 December 2011

Gerry Yemen, S. Venkataraman and Yiorgos Allayannis

Suitable for MBA, Executive MBA, GEMBA, and executive education programs, this case uses CEMEX, a global cement producer based in Mexico, to set the stage for unfolding an…

Abstract

Suitable for MBA, Executive MBA, GEMBA, and executive education programs, this case uses CEMEX, a global cement producer based in Mexico, to set the stage for unfolding an analysis of a growth through acquisition strategy. It offers a discussion about the firm’s overall strategy to acquire on a global scale instead of growing organically and provides an opportunity to introduce basic financial, marketing, and operational terms that can be explored in subsequent classes. The material includes a PMI process that further allows discussion on that technique.

The case opens with a conference call and another barrage of questions for CEO Lorenzo Zambrano about his bid to buy the Australia-based Rinker Group in October 2006. Until this point, CEMEX has had a long-standing habit of buying businesses in emerging markets; this acquisition would be a departure from that strategy. If the deal goes through, it would be the single largest acquisition in CEMEX’s history, and it would be among its few forays into a developed market other than the neighboring United States. The company has grown exponentially and successfully. Why would this effort be any different? Was the acquisition a good idea or not? And if it was, how would Zambrano and his leadership team convince Wall Street and others of that?

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Trevor Turner, Stephen Creighton, Sai Nudurupati and Umit Bititci

This article describes how a Web‐enabled‐performance‐measurement system was designed, implemented and used to improve the business performance of a company processing…

3604

Abstract

This article describes how a Web‐enabled‐performance‐measurement system was designed, implemented and used to improve the business performance of a company processing aluminum foil in central Scotland. The benefits of the system are analyzed in the context of the business‐process‐based structure of the performance measurement system and the evolution of a business improvement culture led by an enlightened general manager. The importance of the use of statistical quality control techniques by the management team to monitor impact of critical input variables on process performance is emphasized.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Umit S. Bititci, Kepa Mendibil, Veronica Martinez and Pavel Albores

The purpose of this research paper is to demonstrate how existing performance measurement may be adopted to measure and manage performance in extended enterprises.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research paper is to demonstrate how existing performance measurement may be adopted to measure and manage performance in extended enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the literature in performance measurement and extended enterprises. It explains the collaborative architecture of an extended enterprise and demonstrates this architecture through a case study. A model for measuring and managing performance in extended enterprises is developed using the case study.

Findings

The research found that due to structural differences between traditional and extended enterprises, the systems required to measure and manage the performance of extended enterprises, whilst being based upon existing performance measurement frameworks, would be structurally and operationally different. Based on this, a model for measuring and managing performance in extended enterprises is proposed which includes intrinsic and extrinsic inter‐enterprise coordinating measures.

Research limitations/implications

There are two limitations this research. First, the evidence is based on a single case, thus further cases should be studied to establish the generalisibility of the presented results. Second, the practical limitations of the EE performance measurement model should be established through longitudinal action research.

Practical implications

In practice the model proposed requires collaborating organisations to be more open and share critical performance information with one another. This will require change in practices and attitudes.

Originality/value

The main contribution this paper makes is that it highlights the structural differences between traditional and collaborative enterprises and specifies performance measurement and management requirements of these collaborative organisations.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

U.S. Bititci, S.S. Nudurupati, T.J. Turner and S. Creighton

In order to respond proactively to the new emerging challenges, management requires up‐to‐date and accurate information on performance. Such performance measurement…

3274

Abstract

In order to respond proactively to the new emerging challenges, management requires up‐to‐date and accurate information on performance. Such performance measurement systems are still not common because there is not sufficient research focused on management implications of IT enabled performance measurement systems. This paper presents an empirical case study where a fully integrated IT enabled performance measurement system was implemented and its management implications studied. The paper concludes, based on a single case study, that if properly implemented, such systems would promote a proactive management style and greater confidence in management decisions.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 22 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Maxine Robertson

Considers the way in which firms first become aware of computer‐aided production management technologies, with reference to three case studies. Focuses on the process…

430

Abstract

Considers the way in which firms first become aware of computer‐aided production management technologies, with reference to three case studies. Focuses on the process through which firms ultimately decide to invest in MRPII, in order to understand more fully the way in which MRPII has diffused within the UK. Highlights the way in which the decisions taken at the selection/adoption stage can affect eventual outcome in terms of successful implementation of MRPII. Suggests that if firms are to compete in global markets, they must adopt and adapt technologies and approaches that are suitable for their unique context and environment, rather than attempting to imitate a “best practice” template.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Antonio Batocchio, Antonio Ghezzi and Andrea Rangone

The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss the reasons why business models fail, while also identifying the features necessary to develop a method that enables…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss the reasons why business models fail, while also identifying the features necessary to develop a method that enables the evaluation of the implementation process of the business model, and is able to help in its development.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed method (roadmap for implementation of business models – RIBM) is composed of nine steps, and seven initials conditions (limitations). Such conditions reduce its complexity (e.g. performance management system is defined in the company).

Findings

Some reasons why business models fail (alignment between value proposition and customer segment (value proposition); business model financial viability (costs and revenue); environmental constraints not fully integrated with the design of the business model (environment); business model execution (management), etc.) and made some considerations about the implementation of business models.

Research limitations/implications

This work was developed in a small business (with a small team and the external member). The business complexity level and number of processes involved are much smaller when compared with a mid-size or large company. Another factor that contributed to mitigating the problem is that the enterprise had a well-structured report once the owners had made annual analysis and discussed how to improve and expand the business.

Practical implications

In this application, RIBM showed a potential tool to minimize flaws in implementation processes of business models.

Originality/value

The business model concept is relatively new in the literature. And because of its strategic importance has been the target of all major schools in the area. This work, in particular, deals with the question-related failures that occur in the process of implementing business models.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

J. Andrew Grimson and David F. Pyke

The paper seeks to develop a framework for sales and operations planning (S&OP) that is based on previous literature and company interviews. It is designed to help…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to develop a framework for sales and operations planning (S&OP) that is based on previous literature and company interviews. It is designed to help managers understand how effective their S&OP processes are and how to progress to advanced stages.

Design/methodology/approach

The S&OP literature, is reviewed and the results of a number of company interviews are presented. These lead to a new framework, with descriptions of each stage, and to implementation insights for managers.

Findings

After highlighting key dimensions for establishing a firm's S&OP maturity on a five‐stage framework and, with the use of this framework, exploring in a preliminary way the relationship between firm size or process type (job shop, batch flow, continuous flow, etc.) and its degree of S&OP plan integration, little apparent relationship was found. However, the data suggest that business processes are enablers of S&OP plan integration, but that information technology is not clearly so.

Research limitations/implications

The results are based on a thorough review of the literature and on 15 in‐depth company interviews. Because the sample size is small, the results should be considered to provide only preliminary insights.

Practical implications

Managers can use the framework to assess their S&OP process maturity. To advance to higher S&OP integration, managers should focus on leadership of business processes that can enable effective S&OP plan integration. These processes include organizational structure, meetings and collaboration across functional areas, and performance measurements. Information technology tools may also be enablers, but they do not appear to be the primary drivers.

Originality/value

The framework separates business processes from information processes. It is quite extensive and therefore provides managers with an indication of the maturity of their S&OP processes. Also presented are insights into an intuitive, albeit challenging, process for advancing through the stages of maturity. Finally, a perspective on the future of S&OP integration is suggested that is focused on optimizing profits rather than myopically maximizing revenues or minimizing costs.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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