Search results

1 – 10 of 116
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Oliver Osborn

Magnesium anodes are useful under conditions where accessibility is difficult and electrical facilities unobtainable. At the Dow Chemical Co.'s Freeport, Texas, plant the…

Abstract

Magnesium anodes are useful under conditions where accessibility is difficult and electrical facilities unobtainable. At the Dow Chemical Co.'s Freeport, Texas, plant the principal use for magnesium anodes has been in structures handling large volumes of sea water and brine, both static and in motion. The following article, based on a paper presented at a meeting of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers, describes some of the cathodic protection studies made by Mr. Osborn, who has been responsible for an extensive programme developing the use of magnesium in cathodic protection.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 2 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

María de la luz Fernández‐Alles and Ramón Valle‐Cabrera

The aim of the paper is to review and compare traditional and new institutional postulates in order to address some of the criticism that this theory has received.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to review and compare traditional and new institutional postulates in order to address some of the criticism that this theory has received.

Design/methodology/approach

Throughout this paper, five interesting paradoxes are presented in management contexts of change, the creation of competitive advantages, and organizational behaviour.

Findings

Light is shed on the integration efforts that seek to combine institutional theory with transaction cost theory, the resource‐based view of the firm, and the resource dependence theory.

Originality/value

The paper reviews the Oliver contribution work done around neoinstitutional theory. The paper offers a different view of organizational change, the creation of competitive advantage, and organizational behaviour.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

A.D. Rust

This article will discuss corrosion and associated subjects as encountered at the two plants of The Dow Chemical Co., Freeport, Texas. This firm has an investment in this…

Abstract

This article will discuss corrosion and associated subjects as encountered at the two plants of The Dow Chemical Co., Freeport, Texas. This firm has an investment in this area in excess of $200 million (£71 million) and produces a variety of organic products, plastics, magnesium, bromine, chlorine and caustic soda as well as many related items. The plants are located about six miles apart on the coastal plain of the Gulf of Mexico where climatic, physiographical and industrial conditions are such that corrosion control is imperative to successful operation. This is the second of two articles; the first featured atmospheric corrosion and painting, and appeared in CORROSION TECHNOLOGY last month.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 3 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

CANNED DRINKING WATER. THE protection given by the tin‐coated steel can against nuclear radiation has been recognised since the Bikini atom bomb tests in 1951. After the…

Abstract

CANNED DRINKING WATER. THE protection given by the tin‐coated steel can against nuclear radiation has been recognised since the Bikini atom bomb tests in 1951. After the tests canned food and beer left on ships exposed to the explosions were found to be uncontaminated by the deadly gamma rays. This has led to the development of a new industry in the U.S.—the canning of drinking water. Hospitals and civil defence units are reported to be laying in stores of canned water for possible use in case water supplies become contaminated in an atomic war.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 2 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

A.D. Rust

This article is concerned primarily with corrosion and associated subjects as encountered at the two plants of The Dow Chemical Co., Freeport, Texas. The firm has an…

Abstract

This article is concerned primarily with corrosion and associated subjects as encountered at the two plants of The Dow Chemical Co., Freeport, Texas. The firm has an investment in this area in excess of $200 million (£71 million) and produces a variety of organic products, plastics, magnesium, bromine, chlorine and caustic soda as well as many related items. The plants are located about six miles apart on the coastal plain of the Gulf of Mexico where climatic, physiographical and industrial conditions are such that corrosion control is imperative to successful operation. This is the first of two articles; the second part, pertaining to sea‐water corrosion, will appear in CORROSION TECHNOLOGY next month.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 3 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Stephen P. Fitzgerald

Collaborative forms range from co-located teams engaged in short term local projects, to international joint ventures, to worldwide networks of organizations and citizens…

Abstract

Collaborative forms range from co-located teams engaged in short term local projects, to international joint ventures, to worldwide networks of organizations and citizens linked together to generate global social change. In order to discern patterns that transcend the breadth of forms (including virtual), a new term is introduced that encompasses the entire spectrum: collaborative entity (CE). The diverse and far-ranging CE literature is then integrated into the Collaborative Capacity (CC) Framework. That framework is comprised of ten broad constructs and their interrelationships that, when considered together, capture fundamental aspects of all CEs. The CC Framework provides a bridge-building language to help facilitate inter-disciplinary, multi-dimensional dialogue, research, and perspectives on fostering collaborative capacity.

Details

Complex Collaboration: Building the Capabilities for Working Across Boundaries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-288-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Steven J. Kahl, Gregory J. Liegel and JoAnne Yates

Purpose – The broader aim of this research is twofold. First, we aim to better understand how the business computer was conceptualized and used within U.S. industry…

Abstract

Purpose – The broader aim of this research is twofold. First, we aim to better understand how the business computer was conceptualized and used within U.S. industry. Second, this research investigates the role of social factors such as relational structure, institutional entrepreneurs, and position in the formation of conceptualizations of new technologies.

Design/methodological/approach – This paper is theoretically motivated in the sense that it responds to the lack of attention to the failure of institutional entrepreneurs to change belief systems. Through detailed archival, network, and descriptive statistical analysis, the paper shows how the failed institutional entrepreneur fits conventional explanations for success. The paper then analyzes two matched cases, comparing the insurance industry's rejection of the institutional entrepreneur with manufacturing's acceptance, in order to identify what is missing in current explanations of institutional entrepreneurs.

Findings – Our analysis reveals that the role of the audience structure in interpreting the institutional entrepreneur's message influences the change outcome. In our case, the institutional entrepreneur's view of the computer as a brain that supported decision-oriented applications did not fit with views of the insurance groups who had centralized authority over interpreting the computer. Because manufacturing had less centralized control in its discourse around the computer, there were fewer constraints on assimilation, allowing the entrepreneur's views to resonate with some of the occupational groups.

Research limitations/implications – This paper develops a theoretical approach to institutional entrepreneurship that situates the entrepreneurial efforts of individual actors within a system characterized by the structure of its audience and subject to distinct historical macro-structural processes that present significant obstacles to the realization of their entrepreneurial projects.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Doug Lancashire

The US Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) ENERGY STAR Buildings Program was established in the early 1990s as a means for building owners and managers to improve…

Abstract

The US Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) ENERGY STAR Buildings Program was established in the early 1990s as a means for building owners and managers to improve the energy performance of their facilities, while simultaneously reducing the amount of pollution emitted into the atmosphere from power plants. The programme outlines a five‐stage approach to improving the energy efficiency of existing buildings to help control rising energy costs. The five stages include lighting upgrades, building tune‐up, load reductions, air distribution system upgrades and HVAC plant upgrades. Each stage is designed to build on the success of the previous stages. Today, the EPA recognises buildings that perform in the top 25 per cent in terms of energy efficiency through the ENERGY STAR Label for Buildings. This paper describes the five‐stage ENERGY STAR Buildings strategy as well as how a building achieves the status of being ENERGY STAR labelled. Furthermore, this paper demonstrates the potential of the ENERGY STAR Buildings Program through a case study of four office buildings, owned and operated by the Ohio Building Authority. These buildings have each been upgraded, following the EPA’s five‐stage strategy, and each has received the ENERGY STAR Label for Buildings.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Nikolaos Panagopoulos and Sergios Dimitriadis

Two rather distinct lines of theory/research have emerged in the study of sales manager's effectiveness. The first focuses on the notion of sales force control systems…

Abstract

Purpose

Two rather distinct lines of theory/research have emerged in the study of sales manager's effectiveness. The first focuses on the notion of sales force control systems (SFCS) while the second focuses on transformational leadership (TL) behaviors. To date, however, no theoretical or empirical attempt has been made to integrate these two mostly unconnected streams of research in a sales management context. The present study aims to attempt such integration by conceptualizing TL as a mediator of the relationship between behavior‐based control (BBC) and key salesperson outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses were gathered via a mail survey from a sample of 128 salespeople working in various industries. Structural equation modeling was employed.

Findings

The results provide evidence for the mediating effect of TL on the relationships between BBC and key salesperson outcomes. Moreover, it was found that BBC positively affects TL behaviors, which, in turn, enhance salesperson performance, satisfaction with supervision, and organizational commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The present study focused at SFCS as a possible antecedent of TL behaviors. Future researchers should identify other possible antecedents of TL behaviors.

Practical implications

With the assumption that TL behaviors enhance salespeople's motivation and performance, chief sales executives should employ a BBC system, as it can facilitate the ability of sales managers to engage in TL behaviors.

Originality/value

This paper fills an important void in current leadership research and offers practical guidance to sales managers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 43 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Tim Oliver Brexendorf and Kevin Lane Keller

Most research on branding highlights the role of associations for a single brand. Many firms, however, have multiple brands and/or different versions of one brand. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Most research on branding highlights the role of associations for a single brand. Many firms, however, have multiple brands and/or different versions of one brand. The latter is largely the case for many corporate brands. This paper aims to broaden the understanding of corporate brand associations and their transfer within the firm’s brand and product portfolio. In particular, this paper also examines the concept of corporate brand innovativeness and the influence of brand architecture as supportive and restrictive boundary conditions for its transfer.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper explains the nature, benefits and challenges of corporate brand innovativeness within the context of a firm’s brand architecture. On the basis of a literature review, the authors provide an overview of the domain and derive avenues for future research.

Findings

Research and practice have not fully realised the importance of corporate brand images for supporting a firms’ product portfolio. In particular, (corporate) marketing managers need to consider the potential value of favourable perceptions of corporate brand innovativeness across products and the moderating role of brand architecture.

Research limitations/implications

More empirical research is needed to understand the reciprocal relationship and transfer between corporate and product brand associations and equity.

Practical implications

A corporate marketing perspective allows firms to use corporate brand associations to support products and services for that brand. This paper discusses perceived corporate brand innovativeness as one particularly important corporate brand association.

Originality/value

The authors discuss the use of corporate brand associations under the consideration of brand architectures and boundaries and draw on several research streams in the brand management literature. Much of the branding and innovation literature centres on the product level; research on corporate brand innovativeness has been relatively neglected.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

1 – 10 of 116