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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2022

Pras Ramluggun, Olga Kozlowska, Sarah Mansbridge, Margaret Rioga and Mahmood Anjoyeb

The purpose of this paper is to examine how faculty staff on health and social care programmes support students with mental health issues.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how faculty staff on health and social care programmes support students with mental health issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a qualitative survey design to gain in-depth information on faculty staff experiences. Seventy-one faculty staff at two universities in the South East of England out of an eligible population of 115 staff responded to an anonymous online questionnaire which were thematically analysed.

Findings

The findings indicated that faculty staff faced uncertainties in providing support to students with mental health needs. They reported tensions between their academic, professional and pastoral roles. There was a wide recognition that supporting students was physically and emotionally demanding for faculty staff and especially challenging when their roles and expectations were unclear. This was compounded by lack of explicit guidelines and an apparent severed connection between faculty staff and student support services.

Practical implications

A need for clearly defined roles and responsibilities for faculty staff in supporting students with mental health needs including a review of their pastoral role were identified. The study reinforces the need for effective collaborative arrangements and collective decision making and clearer procedures in the planning and implementation of students' personal support plans. A concerted effort into adopting a transpersonal approach which incorporates mental health staff awareness training, restorative spaces for reflection and supportive pathways for faculty staff are recommended.

Originality/value

This paper provides rare empirical evidence of faculty staff views on their role in supporting students with mental health needs on health and social care programmes.

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2020

Olga Kozlowska, Gemma Seda Gombau and Rustam Rea

Integration of health services involves multiple interdependent leaders acting at several levels of their organisation and across organisations. This paper aims to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

Integration of health services involves multiple interdependent leaders acting at several levels of their organisation and across organisations. This paper aims to explore the complexities of leadership in an integrated care project and aims to understand what leadership arrangements are needed to enable service transformation.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study analysed system and organisational leadership in a project aiming to integrate primary and specialist care. To explore the former, the national policy documents and guidelines were reviewed. To explore the latter, the official documents from the transformation team meetings and interview data from 17 health-care professionals and commissioners were analysed using thematic analysis with the coding framework derived from the comprehensive and multilevel framework for change (Ferlie and Shortell, 2001).

Findings

Although integration was supported in the narratives of the system and organisational leaders, there were multiple challenges: insufficient support by the system level leadership for the local leadership, insufficient organisational support for (clinical) leadership within the transformation team and insufficient leadership within the transformation team because of disruptions caused by personnel changes, roles ambiguity, conflicting priorities and insufficient resources.

Practical implications

This study provides insights into the interdependencies of leadership across multiple levels and proposes steps to maximise the success of complex transformational projects.

Originality/value

This study’s practical findings are useful for those involved in the bottom-up integrated projects, especially the transformation teams’ members. The case study highlights the need for a toolkit enabling local leaders to operate effectively within the system and organisational leadership contexts.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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