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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Olga Ampuero and Natalia Vila

This paper seeks to discuss the need to understand consumer perceptions in order to correctly design product packing and to achieve the desired position in the minds of consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to discuss the need to understand consumer perceptions in order to correctly design product packing and to achieve the desired position in the minds of consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was divided into two phases. The first, (based on designers' opinions), to determine the key graphic variables in the design of packaging. The second, (based on consumers' opinions), to associate each packaging with a positioning strategy. The seven product‐positioning strategies selected were represented from the consumers' standpoint using multidimensional scaling. Four maps were obtained related to: alternative packaging colours; alternative packaging typography; alternative packaging graphical forms; alternative packaging images

Findings

Each positioning strategy appears associated with particular packaging dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

Consumers have exhibited harmonious perceptions towards products‐packaging strategies, so one can conclude that a general feeling as to what a particular packaging exactly means exists. So the general opinion should guide packaging designers to appropriately meet consumers' expectations.

Originality/value

A range of simulated packaging was prepared for the 46 consumers that took part in the two‐phase experiment: One of the seven positioning strategies was explained. For example: “Product ‘A’ is positioned as reasonably priced. People say the price is OK”; Case to be solved: “From this selection, choose the packaging that seems most suitable for product ‘A’, taking its characteristics into account”. The simulated packaging alternatives were shown and the subject chose the options that seemed most suitable (colour, typography, forms and images). The sequence was repeated for the remaining six positioning typologies.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Begoña Jordá‐Albiñana, Olga Ampuero‐Canellas, Natalia Vila and José Ignacio Rojas‐Sola

The purpose of this paper is to identify the key features of an identity standards manual and assess the differences in the rules used for applying the brand to both low…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the key features of an identity standards manual and assess the differences in the rules used for applying the brand to both low‐ and high‐context cultures, companies selling consumer goods and those selling services, and multinational and local companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is based on the analysis of 341 identity standards manuals and on the analysis of three key features found in the manuals: contents, normative tone, and development.

Findings

The results divide the contents of the manual into two blocks: core and peripheral; and show that there are differences between the manuals of high‐ and low‐context cultures, companies selling consumer goods and those selling services, and multinational and local companies.

Research limitations/implications

Type I errors could have been introduced and the conclusions must be regarded as tentative.

Practical implications

The findings show that applying the brand at an international level requires a strategy of adaptation which takes into account the particular nature of each culture.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the debate on standardization/adaptation of the signs of visual identity (name, logo, and color) in global marketing, by studying the rules used in applying the brand and discussion of the documents which contain them.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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