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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Theodosios Theodosiou, Stavros Valsamidis, Georgios Hatziliadis and Michael Nikolaidis

A huge amount of data are produced in the agriculture sector. Due to the huge number of these datasets it is necessary to use data analysis techniques in order to…

Abstract

Purpose

A huge amount of data are produced in the agriculture sector. Due to the huge number of these datasets it is necessary to use data analysis techniques in order to comprehend the data and extract useful information. The purpose of this paper is to measure, archetype and mine olea europaea production data.

Design/methodology/approach

This work applies three different data mining techniques to data about Olea europaea var. media oblonga from the island of Thassos, at the northern part of Greece. The data were from 1,063 farmers from three different municipalities of Thassos, namely Kallirachi, Limenaria and Prinos and concerned the year 2010. They were analysed using the classification algorithm OneR, the clustering algorithm k‐means and the association rule mining algorithm, Apriori from the WEKA data mining package. Also, new measures which quantify the performance of the productions of olives and oil are applied. Finally, archetypal analysis is applied in order to distinguish the most typical/stereotype farms for each region and describe their specific characteristics.

Findings

The results indicate that organic cultivation could improve the production of olives and olive oil. Furthermore, the climate differences among the three municipalities seems to be a factor involved in production efficacy.

Originality/value

It is the first time that data from the island of Thassos have been analysed systematically using a variety of data mining methods. Also, the measures proposed in the paper in order to analyse the data are new. Furthermore, archetypal analysis is proposed as a method to extract sterotypes/representative farms from the dataset.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2021

Özge Duygu Okur

This study aims to produce a new type of healthy functional kefir by adding olive (Olea europaea) leaf extract and to determine its potential effect on the quality…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to produce a new type of healthy functional kefir by adding olive (Olea europaea) leaf extract and to determine its potential effect on the quality (physicochemical, sensory, phenolic contents and antioxidant properties) of kefir samples during storage at 4°C for 21 days.

Design/methodology/approach

For this purpose, four kefir samples were produced by using olive leaf extract in different amounts (A: 0% (control), B: 0.1%, C: 0.15% and D: 0.35%). The physicochemical, sensory, phenolic contents and antioxidant properties of kefir samples were investigated during Days 1, 7, 14 and 21 of storage. The study was conducted to optimize the olive leaf extract addition level to obtain better-quality kefir functional food.

Findings

From the results, it was determined that the addition of olive leaf extract affected the entire chemical components of the kefir samples (p < 0.05). It was found that the pH value decreased during storage. By contrast, it was observed that titration acidity values increased. The kefir sample with 0.35% olive leaf extract (D) had the highest total phenolic and antioxidant activity content (1,292.75 mg GAE/L and 10.20 mM TE, respectively) among the samples (p < 0.05). In the sensory analyses, the kefir sample with the highest score – in terms of sensory attributes – was the kefir sample containing 0.15% olive leaf extract (C).

Originality/value

Thus, it was concluded that kefir with added olive leaf extract could serve as a functional kefir of benefit to human health. When we looked at the enrichment studies on kefir as a functional product, no study has been found on the use of olive (Olea europaea) leaf extract, especially with kefir. In this sense, it is thought that the study will contribute to published literature.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2021

Jessica Maalouf, Jennifer C. Tomazou, Stephanie Azar, Christelle Bou-Mitri, Jacqueline Doumit, Amira Youssef, Roland B. Andary, Wadih A. Skaff and Milad G. El Riachy

This study aims to identify the effect of selected agro-industrial factors associated with the olive oil phenolic composition, total phenolic content (TPC), antioxidant…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the effect of selected agro-industrial factors associated with the olive oil phenolic composition, total phenolic content (TPC), antioxidant capacity and oxidative stability index (OSI). The study also aims to assess the relationship between the quality indices and each of the individual phenol, TPC, antioxidant capacity and OSI.

Design/methodology/approach

Olive oil samples (n=108) were collected from Lebanese northern (Akkar and Zgharta-Koura) and southern (Hasbaya and Jezzine) regions, at three harvesting times (early, intermediate, late) and using different types of mills (traditional, sinolea, two- and three-phase decanters). The samples were analyzed using official standard methods.

Findings

The highest TPC, antioxidant capacity and OSI were obtained in early harvested olive oil, using two-phase decanters for TPC and three-phase decanters for antioxidant capacity and OSI. A prediction model, including the free acidity, K232, TPC, C18:2, C18:0, tyrosol and apigenin, was obtained; it allowed to predict very highly significantly the OSI (p < 0.001). Apigenin, tyrosol and C18:2 recorded the highest standardized coefficients (ß^+= 0.35) and thus had the highest influence on OSI. As per antioxidant capacity of olive oil, another very highly statistically significant prediction model was constructed (p < 0.001). It included only two predictors, oleacein and TPC, with the latter having the most influence (ß^+= 0.37).

Originality/value

The overall results highlighted the detrimental effects of agro-industrial factors on olive oil chemical composition, and this contributes significantly to improve olive oil’s quality and characteristics, which are important for the product economical and nutritional values.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Mouna Feki, Hédia Hannachi, Moez Bou Ali, Haytem Hamrouni, Elvira Romano, Boubaker Karray and Mohamed Hammami

The purpose of this paper is to build a class model to confirm the authenticity of olives from Bi'r al Malluli, Tunisian region, in order to obtain the Designation of Origin (DO).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build a class model to confirm the authenticity of olives from Bi'r al Malluli, Tunisian region, in order to obtain the Designation of Origin (DO).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, ten orchards of Chemlali olive oil variety were chosen, in Sfax region, characterized by the same applied cultural techniques. Pomological characters of olives, fatty acids composition and organoleptic analysis of olive oil were conducted.

Findings

Results showed that the pomological characters were specific of the Chemlali variety: the olive weight ranged from 0.9 to 1.10 g in all studied orchards and the water content (WC) ranged from 41.45 to 57.68 per cent. All analysed oils showed good fatty acids balance. Chemlali olive oil contains high amounts of oleic acid and a smaller amount of linoleic acid. The oleic acid content ranged from 57.96 to 63.52 per cent according to the orchards. All oils having oleic acid higher than 55 per cent are categorized as extra virgin olive oil based on International Olive Oil Council (IOOC) Norma. Based on the organoleptic analysis, all the analysed oils were classified as an extra virgin olive oil. The principal component analysis applied separately on olive characters and fatty acids contents do not indicate any group's structure.

Originality/value

An objective approach based on pomologic, sensory and acidic composition analyses would be used to delimitate Protected Designation of Origin (PDOs) in olive oil from the Bi'r al Malluli area and better protect their markets.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

M. Ozturk, A. Celik, C. Yarci, A. Aksoy and E. Feoli

The Turkish Mediterranean region covers an area of 198.165km2, including ten states and a coastline of about 4,389km. The area has served as a womb for several…

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Abstract

The Turkish Mediterranean region covers an area of 198.165km2, including ten states and a coastline of about 4,389km. The area has served as a womb for several civilisations. However, its rich plant diversity has been victimized through anthropomorphic pressures. Southwestern shores of Turkey are the main centre of coastal endemism in the Mediterranean basin. The flora in the region on the whole includes more than 700 endemics, out of which about 600 are East‐Mediterranean elements. Out of the endemic taxa distributed in the region more than 40 are facing a threat of extirpation. The region embodies tertiary endemics as well, like Liquidamber orientalis, Eryngium thorifolium and Flueggea anatolica. High mountain zones abound in neoendemics. Although several protected areas have been created lately, demographic pressure, urbanisation, grazing, fires and erosion, are still posing a great threat to the plant diversity. This paper enlightens the impact of the aforementioned land degradation processes on the plant cover of this phytogeographical region in Turkey.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Emin Yilmaz and Buket Aydeniz

The objective of this study is to evaluate the physico‐chemical and sensorial characteristics of some commercial green table olives. Also, it seeks to elaborate the…

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1163

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to evaluate the physico‐chemical and sensorial characteristics of some commercial green table olives. Also, it seeks to elaborate the sensorial background of consumer preferences of different green table olives.

Design/methodology/approach

Four green table olive samples (Çelebi, Domat, Kaba, and Ayvalık) commonly consumed in Turkey were chosen and collected from a local producer. Dimensional measures, salt content, pH value, oil content, titrable acidity, L value, a* value, b* value and texture of samples were assessed by the AOAC methods. A panel described and measured the appearance (greenness, yellowness, globeness), aroma (fresh olive, vinegary, soapy, musty), flavour (sour, salty, bitter, hay, oily) and texture properties (firmness, flesh/stone adherence, fibrousness, watery). In addition, 50 consumers evaluated hedonic values.

Findings

The salt content, pH value, oil content, titrable acidity, L value, a* value, b* value and texture of samples were found to following values 2.91‐5.46 percent, 2.80‐3.97, 4.67‐18.71 percent, 0.59‐1.40 percent, 49.96‐69.56, 1.35‐17.91, 19.57‐45.47 and 434.1‐895.7 g. Although prepared with the same technique, many properties of the olives were found different. This difference affected consumer preference and buying intentions as well.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides scientific data for researchers to design similar sensory descriptive analyses for different table olive samples.

Originality/value

The paper is helpful both to consumers and traders to determine the proximate and sensory attributes of commercial green olive samples.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1952

C. GRIFFITHS

The animal and vegetable oils, fats, and waxes provide vital raw materials for a large number of industries. Soap, paint, foodstuffs, textiles, leather, and linoleum are…

Abstract

The animal and vegetable oils, fats, and waxes provide vital raw materials for a large number of industries. Soap, paint, foodstuffs, textiles, leather, and linoleum are but a few of the diversity of products which employ one or more of this large class of natural bodies.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Liu Dong, Lin Yuanhua, Ding Yigang and Zeng Dezhi

The paper reports an investigation into the use of aqueous extracts of rice bran as a green inhibitor for corrosion of carbon steel in hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper reports an investigation into the use of aqueous extracts of rice bran as a green inhibitor for corrosion of carbon steel in hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution.

Design/methodology/approach

Extracts from the rice bran were used as the main component of an environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitor for use in HCl pickling processes. Inhibition behavior on carbon steel in HCl was investigated by means of mass‐loss tests, polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

Findings

The results show that the extract exhibited good inhibition performance in 1 M HCl. The inhibition efficiency increased with increase in the concentration of the inhibitor and was only moderately affected by temperature variations in the range 303‐363 K. The inhibitive action was due to adsorption on the A3 steel and the adsorption process was consistent with the Langmuir isotherm. The free energy of adsorption (ΔGads.) was −4.192 kJ/mol. The negative value of ΔGads. indicated spontaneous adsorption of the inhibitor occurred on the surface of A3 steel.

Practical implications

Rice bran extract is an effective inhibitor and can be used to protect carbon steel from corrosion in HCl solution.

Originality/value

The rice bran extracts are an effective green inhibitor and can be widely used in the pickling of metals.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 58 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Aristides Matopoulos

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2021

Sara Spognardi, Domenico Vistocco, Lucio Cappelli and Patrizia Papetti

Investigate the behaviour and the habits of the consumers from central-southern Italy in relation to extra olive oil consumption, focussing on the impact of protected…

Abstract

Purpose

Investigate the behaviour and the habits of the consumers from central-southern Italy in relation to extra olive oil consumption, focussing on the impact of protected designation of origin (PDO) and EU–organic certification on purchase intention and quality perception.

Design/methodology/approach

A specific questionnaire was submitted to 160 consumers; a subsample of ten experts, ten semi-experts and ten habitual consumers of olive oil tested, through a blind test first and a normal one then, three Italian samples: an extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) without certification, an organic EVOO and a PDO EVOO, which were characterised also from a chemical-physical point of view. The answers provided during the tastings were statistically analysed and compared.

Findings

People interviewed prefer local olive oils; they are positively influenced by PDO/organic certification, while price is not a decisive factor on the purchasing choices. According to tasting panel results: experts gave consistent answers preferring organic olive oil, semi-experts are positively influenced by the PDO brand contrary to what they claimed; non-experts would buy EVOO, although they are positively influenced by the PDO brand and negatively by the organic certification.

Practical implications

Only knowledge and experience can aid consumers make consistent and aware choices. Information campaigns could help them to distinguish products, correctly identify food attributes and overcome their scepticism towards quality of organic products.

Originality/value

Few works investigated the impact of quality and sustainability labelling on perception of olive oils, valuing the consistency between answers provided before and after sensory assessments.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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