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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Alexander Lauber, Bengt Sandell, Per Holmbom and Ole Pedersen

Scientists at Linkoping Institute of Technology assess the state of tactile sensing and offer some of their own ideas.

Abstract

Scientists at Linkoping Institute of Technology assess the state of tactile sensing and offer some of their own ideas.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Per Holmbom, Ole Pedersen, Bengt Sandell and Alexander Lauber

By tradition, sensors are used to measure one desired parameter; all other parameters influencing the sensor are considered as interfering inputs, to be eliminated if…

Abstract

By tradition, sensors are used to measure one desired parameter; all other parameters influencing the sensor are considered as interfering inputs, to be eliminated if possible. Hence most of existing sensors are specifically intended for measuring one parameter, e.g. temperature, and the ideal temperature sensor should be as immune to all other parameters as possible. True, we sometimes use primitive sensor fusion, e.g. when calculating heat flow by combining separate measurements of temperature difference and of fluid flow.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Emma Lees and Edward Shepherd

The purpose of this paper is to present a “manifesto” exploring a methodological approach to legal analysis, relying upon a morphological understanding of ideology.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a “manifesto” exploring a methodological approach to legal analysis, relying upon a morphological understanding of ideology.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors explore ideology within law and legal culture. They examine one such ideology – rule of law – and consider how this can shape judicial decision-making. They suggest techniques by which such influences can be identified.

Findings

The authors make four findings. First, following Freeden, ideology can be understood as a ubiquitous form of political thinking which seeks to fix the meanings of essentially contested concepts. Second, ideology in this sense forms an important part, but is distinguishable from the wider notion of legal culture. Considering ideology in law as a sub-system of legal culture can therefore be fruitful in providing a rich understanding of interpretive disagreements among the judiciary. Third, rule of law as an ideal is itself ideological, as it comprises contested concepts such as certainty, equality, stability and legality. It can be considered to constitute an internal ideology of law and it can be analysed how the concepts are de-contested in individual decisions. Finally, understanding this can help in the analysis of judgments in areas with high levels of administrative discretion and political contestation, such as planning and environmental law, as it helps us to understand how any particular judge sees the role of the court in its wider political context.

Originality/value

The originality of the authors’ approach lies in the drawing together of methodological techniques and understandings of ideology in, and in relation to, law.

Details

Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9407

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2015

Ole Madsen, Simon Bøgh, Casper Schou, Rasmus Skovgaard Andersen, Jens Skov Damgaard, Mikkel Rath Pedersen and Volker Krüger

The purpose of this study has been to evaluate the technology of autonomous mobile manipulation in a real world industrial manufacturing environment. The objective has…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study has been to evaluate the technology of autonomous mobile manipulation in a real world industrial manufacturing environment. The objective has been to obtain experience in the integration with existing equipment and determine key challenges in maturing the technology to a level of readiness suitable for industry. Despite much research within the topic of industrial mobile manipulation, the technology has not yet found its way to the industry. To mature the technology to a level of readiness suitable for industry real-world experience is crucial. This paper reports from such a real-world industrial experiment with two mobile manipulators.

Design/methodology/approach

In the experiment, autonomous industrial mobile manipulators are integrated into the actual manufacturing environment of the pump manufacturer Grundfos. The two robots together solve the task of producing rotors; a task constituted by several sub-tasks ranging from logistics to complex assembly. With a total duration of 10 days, the experiment includes workspace adaptation, safety regulations, rapid robot instruction and running production.

Findings

With a setup time of less than one day, it was possible to program both robots to perform the production scenario in collaboration. Despite the success, the experiment clearly demonstrated several topics in need of further research before the technology can be made available to the industry: robustness and cycle time, safety investigations and possibly standardization, and robot and workstation re-configurability.

Originality/value

Despite the attention of research around the world, the topic of industrial mobile manipulation has only seen a limited number of real-world integrations. This work reports from a comprehensive integration into a real-world running production and thus reports on the key challenges identified from this integration.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Marianne Wollf Lundholt, Ole Have Jørgensen and Bodil Stilling Blichfeldt

This study aims to contribute to an increased understanding of intra-organizational city brand resistance by identifying and discussing different types of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to contribute to an increased understanding of intra-organizational city brand resistance by identifying and discussing different types of counter-narratives emerging from the political and administrative arenas.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical material consists of secondary data as well as six in-depth semi-structured interviews with Danish mayors and city managers in three different municipalities in Denmark.

Findings

Intra-organizational counter-narratives differ from inter-organizational counter-narratives but resemble a number of issues known from extra-organizational resistance. Still, significant differences are found within the political arena: lack of ownership, competition for resources and political conflicts. Lack of ownership, internal competition for resources and distrust of motives play an important role within the administrative arena. Mayors are aware of the needs for continued political support for branding projects but projects are nonetheless realized despite resistance if there is a political majority for it.

Research limitations/implications

This study points to the implications of city brand resistance and counter-narratives emerging from the “inside” of the political and administrative arenas in the city, here defined as “intra-organizational counter-narratives”.

Practical implications

It is suggested that politicians and municipality staff should be systematically addressed as individual and unique audiences and considered as important as citizens in the brand process.

Originality/value

So far little attention has been paid to internal stakeholders within the municipal organization and their impact on the city branding process approached from a narrative perspective.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Ole da Silva Smith

Introducing the concept of a design domain to truss topology optimization, this paper presents an algorithm generating geometrically admissible ground structures on…

Abstract

Introducing the concept of a design domain to truss topology optimization, this paper presents an algorithm generating geometrically admissible ground structures on possibly concave (or even disconnected) 3D design domains. That is a set of connections between nodal points actually respecting the geometry of the design domain. Since ground structures may be applied in other contexts the presentation does not assume any specifics of truss topology optimization. However, in the example section an application of ground structures in a truss topology optimization problem may be found.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 May 2012

Linne Marie Lauesen

Quality is often defined as cognitive perceptual attributes or properties, and researchers often disagree about which terms should be appropriate in determining quality…

Abstract

Quality is often defined as cognitive perceptual attributes or properties, and researchers often disagree about which terms should be appropriate in determining quality(Reeves & Bednar, 1994). Business research in marketing attaches value to the properties of quality (Zeithaml, 1988) and measures this in terms of ‘money’ and customer ‘expectations’. The idea of connecting quality to values through a persistent market – that is determining measurable accounts to products and properties – relies on the idea of an invisible hand controlling the market by competition (March, 1994; Smith, 1776/1976), and it assumes there is a reliable way to control quality and value. But discussions and debates arise when discussing the quality or value of abstract phenomena such as service.

Details

Business Strategy and Sustainability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-737-6

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Andrej Christian Lindholst, Morten Balle Hansen and Ole Helby Petersen

– The purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of the evolution of marketization in the public sector as a process of institutional change.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of the evolution of marketization in the public sector as a process of institutional change.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a study of marketization and gradual changes in the involvement of private contractors (as providers of maintenance services) in the municipal road and park sectors in Denmark over the past 30 years. The study draws theoretically on historical institutionalism as an interpretive framework and empirically on findings from earlier research, register data from municipal accounts as well as new survey data.

Findings

Marketization within the road and park sectors has historically taken place through gradual changes, in particular by processes of layering and displacement, which has added up to substantial transformations in both sectors. Transformations relate to the levels of private sector involvement, the purpose of using private contractors, the extent of competition and the design of contractual arrangements. The road sector has been a frontrunner in this marketization process, while the park sector increasingly has been “catching up.”

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the understanding of the historical development and differential pathways of marketization within the public sector. In particular, the study highlights how pathways of gradual change, spurred by the influx of long-term policy pressures, over time can lead to substantial institutional transformations.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Mads Hvilshøj, Simon Bøgh, Oluf Skov Nielsen and Ole Madsen

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field, autonomous industrial mobile manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical…

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1561

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field, autonomous industrial mobile manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical implementations and applications.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an introduction to AIMM, this paper investigates the missing links and gaps between the research and developments efforts and the real‐world application requirements, in order to bring the AIMM technology from laboratories to manufacturing environments. The investigation is based on 12 general application requirements for robotics: sustainability, configuration, adaptation, autonomy, positioning, manipulation and grasping, robot‐robot interaction, human‐robot interaction, process quality, dependability, and physical properties.

Findings

The concise yet comprehensive review provides both researchers (academia) and practitioners (industry) with a quick and gentle overview of AIMM. Furthermore, the paper identifies key open issues and promising research directions to realize real‐world integration and maturation of the AIMM technology.

Originality/value

This paper reviews the interdisciplinary research field, autonomous industrial mobile manipulation (AIMM).

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Ole Henning Sørensen

The purpose of this paper is to document and discuss the effects of a participatory intervention in preschools focussing upon improving the performance of the primary task…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document and discuss the effects of a participatory intervention in preschools focussing upon improving the performance of the primary task on employee health and organizational effectiveness. Further, to investigate the role of implementation intensity on the outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal, participatory intervention study of 62 preschools involving approximately 1,800 employees. The evaluation uses short-term sickness absence to measure employee health, employee-assessed primary-task quality and parent-assessed user satisfaction to measure organizational effectiveness, and implementation intensity was measured as hours per employee and as per the request by the workplace managers, and compensation was offered by the project.

Findings

The multi-level analyses show that preschools with higher implementation intensity have stronger effects on employee health and organizational effectiveness than preschools with lower implementation intensity. The differences indicate that the main intervention component, improving performance of the central work tasks through collaborative, participatory workplace activities, had effects on both health and effectiveness and that workplace and employee engagement in the intervention is crucial to its success.

Practical implications

Inspired by the Tavistock tradition for socio-technical systems design, the study indicates an avenue for conducting collaborative organizational change processes that benefit both employees and organizations. In addition, it proposes “hours used per employee” as a relatively simple measure of implementation intensity in such interventions.

Originality/value

The study contributes to research in the field of occupational psychological health by reporting on a comprehensive participatory intervention study comprising measures of employee health, organizational performance and implementation intensity.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

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