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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Sambo Zulu, Ephraim Zulu and Mwansa Chabala

This study examined the factors that influence households’ intention to adopt solar energy solutions in Zambia. This, in view of low adoption rates of solar energy…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined the factors that influence households’ intention to adopt solar energy solutions in Zambia. This, in view of low adoption rates of solar energy solutions even in the wake of a widespread electricity power generation deficit across sub-Sahara Africa (SSA) has plagued the region with daily electricity load shedding lasting several hours at a time. Given the vast potential for solar energy generation in the region, solar energy solutions have become an attractive option to grid-based electricity, and many households have intentions of adopting these solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the lens of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), the study surveyed adult household members in Zambia who contributed towards the household’s income. The participants were selected using the snowballing technique, which yielded a sample of 961 respondents. The results were analysed using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results show that attitude, trust, benefits and subjective norms influence the intention to adopt solar energy solutions. Trust and benefits also influence the intention to adopt solar energy solutions indirectly through attitude. Therefore, measures aimed at increasing the adoption of solar energy solutions should focus on improving the attitude, perceived benefits, trust in the solutions and consider subjective norms.

Originality/value

The findings add to the understanding of the factors that influence the intention to adopt solar energy solutions in Zambia. Therefore, the findings can be used to inform measures aimed at improving solar energy uptake in Zambia. The study also reports on the previously unreported mediating role of attitude towards solar energy solution on the associations between perceived benefits and trust with solar energy solutions adoption intention.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 July 2021

Sambo Lyson Zulu, Mwansa Chabala and Ephraim Zulu

The study examined perceptions and beliefs that influence the intention to adopt solar energy solutions in the Zambian Housing Sector. This is important because empirical…

Abstract

Purpose

The study examined perceptions and beliefs that influence the intention to adopt solar energy solutions in the Zambian Housing Sector. This is important because empirical evidence for measures aimed at improving the adoption of solar energy solutions with SSA in general or a Zambian context, in particular, are largely missing from the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Hierarchical multiple linear regression was used to analyse quantitative data collected through an online questionnaire survey. A total of 947 valid responses were obtained from a convenient sample of household heads.

Findings

The results show that attitude towards solar energy solutions, subjective norms, perceived benefits, perceived trust, knowledge about solar energy solutions, load-shedding and social norms, in that order of magnitude, influence the intention to adopt solar energy solutions. Perceived behavioural control, perceived risk and perceived cost did not influence the intention to adopt solar energy solutions.

Originality/value

The results provide empirical evidence of important factors to drive the adoption of solar energy solutions in Zambia. The results further show that knowledge about available solar energy solutions, rather than general knowledge about renewable energy, influence the adoption intention of solar energy solutions.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2022

Richard Kwasi Bannor, Bismark Amfo, Khadija Sarquah, Helena Oppong-Kyeremeh and Samuel Kwabena Chaa Kyire

This study aims to focus on the nexus between off-grid systems and impacts on islands and remote villages in Ghana by investigating the sources and cost of energy…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on the nexus between off-grid systems and impacts on islands and remote villages in Ghana by investigating the sources and cost of energy, willingness to pay for electricity and impacts of off-grid energy on the local economy, education, health, social activities, the environment and migration.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from 110 households; heterogeneous impact analysis of off-grid technologies, average treatment effect by inverse probability weights (IPW) and inverse probability weighted regression adjustment (IPWRA) models were used to analyse the data.

Findings

The sources of energy are gas, kerosene, wood fuel and dry-cell battery. All households in communities with neither electricity nor off-grid system were willing to pay for electricity. Households without off-grid systems (US$8.1) were willing to pay higher amounts per month for electricity. The off-grid technologies improve the local economy, social activities, security, the environment, education and health as well as reduce out-migration.

Originality/value

Most of the literature on mini-grid/off-grid systems have been from the engineering and the technical perspective, with a few on the socioeconomic impacts of the systems and consumer engagements. Besides, methods including descriptive statistics, energy technology sustainability framework and qualitative analysis were used in these studies. Nevertheless, the authors used a more rigorous method of the doubly robust inverse probability weighted regression adjustment model and a heterogeneous method to model the impact analysis of off-grid systems.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2021

Nusrat Jahan Imu, Anayo Ezeamama and Saheed Matemilola

Decentralized solar systems are increasingly being used as alternative source of off-grid electrification in Bangladesh. They offer solutions to provide (clean…

Abstract

Purpose

Decentralized solar systems are increasingly being used as alternative source of off-grid electrification in Bangladesh. They offer solutions to provide (clean) electricity to the low-income households that are not currently served by the national grid. The standards of solar systems need to be improved to maximize the benefits they offer for off-grid electrification.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research approach was used to explore the power output performance of six solar systems samples. In order to realize a proper load management, daily power production was measured to determine the generation capacity of 50, 60 and 100 Wp monocrystalline and polycrystalline modules when average solar irradiation was 916 W/m2. In the testing system, the irradiation was measured by panel analyzer HT instrument I-V 400. The load arrangement comprised of different kinds of appliances (fan, light, TV). The daily consumption of energy by these loads was calculated using daily operational hours to determine system power performance.

Findings

The authors found that monocrystalline system performs better than polycrystalline by 0.39 kilowatt-hour (kWh) with capacity of 100 watt-peak (Wp) modules. The carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions reduction potential of our sample solar systems were also estimated by assuming a scenario. This was derived by using the electricity emission factor for natural gas (CH4), since CH4 is the main source of energy for power generation in Bangladesh. Savings in CO2 of 0.52 kgCO2/kWh is possible with the adoption of a 100 Wp monocrystalline module.

Practical implications

Government actions that promote the use of monocrystalline module will enhance the benefits of the use of solar systems in providing quality and sustainable electricity. This will contribute to government's efforts towards achieving some of the United Nations (UN) sustainable development goals (SDG) and resilience of the most vulnerable population to the effects and impacts of climate change.

Originality/value

Almost all solar modules found in off-grid areas are polycrystalline whose energy generation capacity is much lower compared to monocrystalline types. But use of low efficient polycrystalline solar module hindered the development of country's solar sector and option to save carbon emission. The use of highly efficient monocrystalline solar module will save also the country's land as the country has land scarcity challenges for establishing large-scale solar power plant. The authors also recommend actions that can be implemented at the national level to improve the attractiveness of monocrystalline solar systems in Bangladesh.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Home solar panels are providing electricity to households in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) that otherwise may not link to grids in the near-to-medium term. Just as households…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB217122

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Book part
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Céline Cholez and Pascale Trompette

Over the past three decades, new off-grid electrification infrastructures – as micro-grids and other solar solutions – have moved from innovative initiatives, conducted by…

Abstract

Over the past three decades, new off-grid electrification infrastructures – as micro-grids and other solar solutions – have moved from innovative initiatives, conducted by NGOs and private stakeholders, to a credible model promoted by international organizations for electrification of rural areas in developing countries. Multiple conditions support their spread: major technological advances in the field of renewable energies (panels, batteries), intensive Chinese industrial production allowing lower prices, institutional reforms in Africa including these solutions in major national electrification programmes, and, finally, an opening to the private sector as a supposed guarantee of the projects’ viability. However, while the development of this market calls for significant investments, a vast set of calculations and a strong “micro-capitalist” doctrine, all involved in their design, experts admit that a large proportion of projects hardly survive or even fail.

This chapter investigates these failures by exploring the ecology of such infrastructures, designed for “the poor.” It discusses “thinking infrastructures” in terms of longevity by focusing on economic failures risks. The authors argue that the ecology of the infrastructure integrates various economic conversions and exchanges chains expected to participate in the infrastructure’s functioning. By following energy access solutions for rural Africa in sub-regions of Senegal and Madagascar, from their political and technical design to their ordinary life, the authors examine the tensions and contradictions embedded within the scripts of balance supposed to guarantee their success.

Details

Thinking Infrastructures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-558-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2020

Mehdi Jahangiri, Ahmad Haghani, Shahram Heidarian, Ali Mostafaeipour, Heidar Ali Raiesi and Akbar Alidadi Shamsabadi

Rural areas are one of the effective regions in economy and self-sufficiency field especially in agricultural and livestock section. Planning in the rural section and the…

Abstract

Purpose

Rural areas are one of the effective regions in economy and self-sufficiency field especially in agricultural and livestock section. Planning in the rural section and the effort in solving the problems of farmers lead to increase their interest in farming and manufacturing in the villages and decrease their migration to the cities and metropolitans. Therefore, the present study aimed at feasibility of electricity to a rural household in Iran using off-grid solar-based hybrid system.

Design/methodology/approach

In renewable energy projects, a successful evaluation requires suitable criteria so that one can properly analyze the operational behavior of all feasible scenarios. In the present paper, HOMER software has been used for this purpose for a village with no access to electricity grid (Bar Aftab-e Jalaleh, Iran). Due to drastic fluctuation of fossil fuel prices and varied solar radiations in various years because of climate change, sensitivity analysis has been performed using HOMER.

Findings

In the optimum status economically, 70% of needed energy is provided by solar cells at the price 0.792 $/kWh. The comparison between the optimum condition economically and the condition that only use fossil fuels revealed that the return on investment will occur after less than 2 years and have remained profitable over 23 years.

Social implications

The authors hope that the results of this study can be used in planning of the authorities to realize the interests of people in this village.

Originality/value

According to the surveys, despite Iran being the first country in terms of providing solar power to the villages, so far no socio-economic-environmental assessment has been done for a solar cell-based micro-grid in an off-grid mode for a remote village that is deprived of electricity from a national electricity grid. In addition, for the first time in Iran, the effect of the fuel price and solar radiation parameters variability on the performance of system have been investigated.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2018

Konstantinos Karanasios and Paul Parker

The purpose of this paper is to understand the issues related to the deployment of renewable electricity technologies (RETs) in remote indigenous communities by examining…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the issues related to the deployment of renewable electricity technologies (RETs) in remote indigenous communities by examining the views of key informants in a remote northern Ontario community through the lens of a wicked problem approach, with the goal to identify policy direction and strategies for the further development of renewable electricity projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses semi-structured interviews with community key informants, informed discussions with community members and energy conference participants and literature reviews of academic, policy and utility documents as complementary data sources for triangulation of results.

Findings

According to informants, the complexity surrounding the deployment of RETs in remote Canadian indigenous communities is the result of different stakeholder perspectives on the issues that RETs are expected to address. Furthermore, institutional complexity of the electricity generation system and uncertainty over both the choice of off-grid renewable technology and the future of electricity generation systems structure and governance add to this complexity.

Research limitations/implications

Given the governments’ legal obligation to consult with indigenous people for projects within their territories, community perspectives provide insights for policy design to support both the deployment of RETs and address indigenous communities sustainability goals.

Originality/value

This paper offers views and opinions of community members from an off-grid Canadian indigenous community. Community members describe how they envision their electricity systems and the desired contribution of community owned renewable electricity generation to increase local control and economic development.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 19 October 2019

Boris Urban and Jabu Maphalala

The learning outcomes are that at the end of the case discussion, the students should be able to evaluate the drivers of social innovation in an African context; discuss…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are that at the end of the case discussion, the students should be able to evaluate the drivers of social innovation in an African context; discuss social entrepreneurship as a process-driven set of activities; assess the organisation–environment–opportunity fit when innovating; analyse and resolve practical issues in developing simple and affordable social innovations; appreciate how social enterprises are mission-based businesses rather than charities; and evaluate how an organisation may achieve social objectives and remain sustainable.

Case overview/synopsis

SolarTurtle is an award-winning South African social enterprise that manufactures and supplies secure, mobile, solar power stations and kiosks to communities where the electricity grid does not reach. The company converts shipping containers into housings for solar panels to protect them from theft and extreme weather conditions. These units are called “PowerTurtles”. Through the franchise model, the company supplies PowerTurtles to off-grid institutions in rural areas. PowerTurtles are also sold to private sector enterprises and are scalable to suit the energy needs of customers. With the successful launch of the AutoTurtle in 2018 (which folds away the solar panels automatically, where the PowerTurtle requires them to be folded away manually), the company started to develop a new lightweight, fibreglass, solar kiosk with roof-mounted solar panels called the MiniTurtle, and a mobile trolley version known as the BabyTurtle. Now, in 2018, Van der Walt hopes to develop the business to the point where it can sustain itself.

Complexity academic level

Post-graduate students of entrepreneurship, public governance and social welfare.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available upon request for educators only. These teaching notes should be shared solely with the instructor and students should not have access to. Please contact your library to gain login or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

1 – 10 of 161