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SDG14 – Life Below Water: Towards Sustainable Management of Our Oceans
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-651-0

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Alex M. Andrew

The purpose of this paper is to review developments on the internet, especially those of general cybernetic interest.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review developments on the internet, especially those of general cybernetic interest.

Design/methodology/approach

The need to reduce carbon emissions on account of the atmospheric greenhouse effect has recently been queried, but observations of effects on the oceans confirm its continuing importance. A means of viewing new buildings in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the site of origin of much of cybernetics, is indicated, as is also a remarkable development of an advanced prosthetic device. Sources of information about the recent WikiLeaks or “Cablegate” events are reviewed.

Findings

Effects of acidification on ocean biota are serious. New buildings on the MIT campus are not following the example of the bizarre Stata Center. The robotic exoskeleton is a valuable development made under unusual conditions. No attempt is made to judge ethics or long‐term effects of WikiLeaks activity but it is shown to be wide ranging and to be defended eloquently by its main operative.

Practical implications

The need to reduce carbon emissions is confirmed by studies of the oceans, probably among other factors. The exoskeleton development is a valuable addition to prosthetic technology as well as an example of what can be done with limited resources.

Originality/value

It is hoped this is a valuable periodic review.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 40 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Abstract

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SDG14 – Life Below Water: Towards Sustainable Management of Our Oceans
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-651-0

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Book part
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Alana Mann

Abstract

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Food in a Changing Climate
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-725-9

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

Patrick Moriarty and Damon Honnery

The purpose of this paper is to show that the observed strong link between global economic output and primary energy use will continue in future; and attempts to replace…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that the observed strong link between global economic output and primary energy use will continue in future; and attempts to replace fossil fuels with alternative energy sources or implementing CO2 removal or geoengineering approaches cannot provide the level of clean energy that economic growth needs. Global economic growth, therefore, is unlikely to continue for much longer.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses historical and recent global data (2012) for energy output from various sources, economic output and CO2, emissions to make its case.

Findings

Alternative energy output is growing too slowly, and faces too many problems, to significantly change the energy mix in the coming decades. Continued use of fossil fuels requires either massive CO2 removal/sequestration or global solar radiation management (SRM). The first is too expensive and would take decades to be significant, the second carries risks, some already known and possibly also unknown ones.

Practical implications

The paper makes the case that technical fixes such as alternative fuels, energy efficiency improvements, carbon dioxide capture and SRM will not be sufficient to prevent global climate change.

Social implications

Social change, rather than reliance on technical fixes, is needed for ecologically sustainable economies.

Originality/value

Most research argues that global energy intensity and carbon intensity will continue to fall. In contrast, we argue that the strong link observed between global economic output and primary energy use will most likely continue.

Details

foresight, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Book part
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Kathleen M. Sullivan

This chapter traces an emerging place-based governance region and identity centered on the California Current large marine ecosystem, which takes in the states of Oregon…

Abstract

This chapter traces an emerging place-based governance region and identity centered on the California Current large marine ecosystem, which takes in the states of Oregon, Washington, California, First Nations, and the federal government branches and agencies responsible for west coast ocean governance. These efforts have been fostered by Executive Orders aiming to coordinate the work of federal agencies responsible for governing the ocean and have been realized in the human and ocean data networks, and working forums of government representatives from the state, federal, and First Nations governments. My analysis brings science and technology studies, law and society studies, and anthropological ethnographic practice into conversation through an exploration of the bureaucratic socialities that are challenged with grappling with the social and ethical ramifications of unpredictable ocean conditions due to impending climate change and increased human uses.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-058-0

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Henry N. Mooney, Miguel A. Cárdenas Jr and Miguel A. Cárdenas

This study aims to unify phenomena in academic and grey literature into a theory of marine spatial disappropriation based on geopolitical relationships. It is argued that…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to unify phenomena in academic and grey literature into a theory of marine spatial disappropriation based on geopolitical relationships. It is argued that conflict over marine space arises as a result of top-down sovereign control of marine resources, and that the recognition of marine tenure and greater inclusivity in marine development* decision-making would lessen conflict between users, such as artisanal fishermen and ecotourism businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

A preliminary literature review was conducted, followed by a research study at Cabo Pulmo National Park (CPNP) in Baja California Sur, Mexico.

Findings

The results demonstrate that though CPNP's tenure structure is unique and inclusivity is an element of its management, the degree to which it is practiced is not sufficient to eliminate the chance of eventual disappropriation and ensuing conflict.

Practical implications

The results of this assessment can be used to strengthen the argument in favour of developing stronger requirements for deliberative democratic decision-making in marine delineation, as well as bolder social performance standards in marine development industries.

Originality/value

Research on socio-environmental revolutions are not new, but the authors contest that they are not alone a sufficient condition for achieving reduced conflict long-term. Instead, the originality of this research lies in its exploration of the importance of customary and formal tenure over marine resources, and its suggestion that this on the whole reduces conflict between exclusive and competing interests. One popular alternative, as demonstrated in numerous cases around the globe, can often be the marginalization of small-scale ocean users through the forceful appropriation of ocean resources.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

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Book part
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Barrie Pittock and G. Dale Hess

Sustainable atmospheric management today involves a complex set of issues arising from the deliberate or inadvertent use of the atmosphere as a repository for waste…

Abstract

Sustainable atmospheric management today involves a complex set of issues arising from the deliberate or inadvertent use of the atmosphere as a repository for waste products arising from human activities. Urban pollution affects human health, building materials and vegetation. Acidic emissions and excess nutrients produce both acid rain and dry deposition that affect terrestrial, freshwater and ocean chemistry and ecosystems. The production and effects of atmospheric pollution can transcend national boundaries and thus mitigation will require cooperation on regional and global levels, as well as local action. Global pollution includes greenhouse gases and atmospheric particles which are changing the global climate and affecting human health. While technological solutions will play an important part, the large reductions in emissions necessary to achieve sustainability will involve adopting lifestyles that conserve energy and minimise pollution. These concerns were foreshadowed in the writings of Fritz Schumacher.

Details

Extending Schumacher's Concept of Total Accounting and Accountability into the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-301-9

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Elizabeth A. Mackay and Andrew Spencer

This conceptual paper examines the Caribbean tourism sector, its growth, performance, importance and its vulnerability to climate change. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

This conceptual paper examines the Caribbean tourism sector, its growth, performance, importance and its vulnerability to climate change. The purpose of this paper is to serve as an introduction to the on-going conversation around climate change and the socioeconomic impacts likely to be experienced in tourism-dependent Caribbean territories.

Design/methodology/approach

The Caribbean is used as the context of this work. A broad perspective was adopted to paint a picture of the wider implications. The region is represented by a multiplicity of country profiles, both in physical and socio-economic characteristics; this warrants a broad assessment of the issues examined here.

Findings

This work shows that the Caribbean tourism sectors face significant future threats related to both competitiveness and climate change impacts. For a region so heavily dependent on coastal- and marine-related tourism attractions, adaptation and resilience are critical issues facing Caribbean tourism. An effective approach to building resilience to climate change requires extensive regional cooperation.

Research limitations/implications

While there is much published on the matter of climate change implications in the general global context, there is considerably less published work specifically examining the likely effects climate change will have on the special socio-economic features of the Caribbean and on the tourism industry in particular.

Practical implications

The lack of extensive and ongoing research dedicated to climate change implications for Caribbean tourism, while limiting the scope of this work, does highlight a gap and open the door for future work that examines, in greater detail both collectively and on an individual country basis, the climate change implications for tourism industries throughout the region.

Social implications

Climate change vulnerabilities in the region present a significant threat to economic development, employment and food security among others. Coastal flooding, infrastructural damage and the potential displacement of coastal communities present significant impediments to the quality of life of Caribbean nationals. The social implications necessitate further in-depth study to inform the development of adaptation strategies that may secure the tourism industry and the livelihoods and lifestyles of the people.

Originality/value

This work is original in its evaluation of the viewpoints of climate change vulnerability specific to the Caribbean tourism sector.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Alana Mann

Abstract

Details

Food in a Changing Climate
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-725-9

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