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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1975

Eileen Fairhurst

Occupational Choice Personnel Planning and Occupational Choice The way in which people get into, stay in or leave occupations interests us all. Not least because each and…

Abstract

Occupational Choice Personnel Planning and Occupational Choice The way in which people get into, stay in or leave occupations interests us all. Not least because each and every one of us is part of the work‐world: we have all experienced and gone through the process of entering an occupation. In addition our interest arises from an academic viewpoint. Western industrialized society is characterized by a complex division of labour. Associated with this form of social organization is the principle that types of work are related to the execution of specific tasks. The division of labour depends on the allocation of people into occupations: there must be a match between jobs or tasks and individuals possessing skills appropriate to the execution of such tasks.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2019

Alexandra Budjanovcanin, Ricardo Rodrigues and David Guest

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of career regret. It examines processes that give rise to it including social comparison, social influences on career…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of career regret. It examines processes that give rise to it including social comparison, social influences on career choice and career satisfaction and explores its association with occupational commitment and intention to quit the profession.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested among 559 British cardiac physiologists, using an online survey and structural equation modelling.

Findings

Research propositions were supported; social influences and social comparison are both associated with career regret. Direct and indirect pathways were found between career regret, occupational commitment and intention to quit the profession.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides a starting point for future career regret research using a range of methods.

Practical implications

Careers advisers both at the point of career choice and within organisations should encourage realistic occupation previews. Managers should become aware of career regret and help to mitigate its effects – for example, facilitating job crafting or reframing of experiences.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to investigate career choice regret and its associated psychological mechanisms.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2012

Anastasia Klimova

The purpose of this paper is to analyse determinants of occupational allocation by gender, in Russia, between 1994 and 2001, using the only available nationally…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse determinants of occupational allocation by gender, in Russia, between 1994 and 2001, using the only available nationally representative longitudinal survey (RLMS).

Design/methodology/approach

Multinomial logit was chosen as the estimation technique for this analysis.

Findings

It was found that gender significantly affects occupational distribution after controlling for human capital and other characteristics during all years. Educational attainment was significant for professionals and technicians/associate professionals, while work experience was significant for craft and plant workers. Marital status did not affect females' occupational allocation while married males were less likely to be unskilled and craft workers. It appears that women performed primarily non‐geographically dependent jobs and the significance of regional variation for females' employment diminished over time. A comparison of the actual and predicted females' occupation distribution revealed a large over‐representation of females in unskilled occupations.

Originality/value

The paper makes an original contribution to our understanding of occupational distribution by demonstrating that occupational segregation by gender is a large and economically significant factor in the Russian labour market, even after controlling for individuals' human capital and personal characteristics and for regional variations. The paper illustrates the extent of this segregation by comparing the actual occupational distribution of females to that which would occur if they faced the same structure of occupational determination as males, i.e. in the absence of discrimination and differences in tastes.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 39 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2021

Stefan Mann

Empirical studies on occupational choice have typically concentrated on a specific sector. The purpose of this study is to compare two sectors wherein there are grounds to…

Abstract

Purpose

Empirical studies on occupational choice have typically concentrated on a specific sector. The purpose of this study is to compare two sectors wherein there are grounds to hypothesise that lifestyle reasons play a key role for occupational choice.

Design/methodology/approach

Arguing that the potential for qualitative web scraping is still underused, the hypothesis is tested through qualitative web scraping for occupational choices.

Findings

It is shown that incomes for farmers are both documented in a better way and higher than in arts. The central roles played by farmers in the provision of basic needs and in powerful value chains are possible reasons for this difference. As a common factor between the sectors, two-thirds of both farmers and artists choose their profession for reasons of self-realisation or societal motives.

Originality/value

This study is the first to show both common grounds and differences in occupational choices of two different sectors.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2015

Steffen Hillmert

Gender-specific segregation of occupations has remained a typical characteristic of contemporary labour markets. From an individual perspective, (gender-)specific…

Abstract

Gender-specific segregation of occupations has remained a typical characteristic of contemporary labour markets. From an individual perspective, (gender-)specific positioning in the labour market is the result of longer-term developments over the life course; these may be influenced by specific macro-level conditions. For example, education and training systems may differ in the information they provide for individual educational and occupational decisions and in the biographical consequences of these decisions. This chapter analyses the potential relevance of education and training systems for gender-specific occupational expectations at a comparatively young age. The empirical analyses use data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2000, 2003 and 2006 and from the European Labour Force Survey (ELFS), comparing occupational gender segregation in early individual expectations and in the labour force across 22 European countries. In a multi-level analysis, expectations are related to both individual-level predictors and characteristics of education and training systems. The results show that anticipated choices of gender-specific occupations are loosely related to characteristics of education and training systems. In particular, the degree of vocational enrolment seems to enforce the level of segregation. However, these associations are group-specific and rather small. Education and training systems also tend to have different consequences for the expectations of young women and young men. Gender segregation already exists at early biographical stages, but it is often modified by later adaptation and the selective behaviour of institutions and employers.

Details

Gender Segregation in Vocational Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-347-1

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2020

Letitia Hadden, Aisling O’Riordan and Jeanne Jackson

Equality of rights for individuals who identify as being lesbian or gay (LG) have emerged over recent years, and significant advancements have been made in recognition and…

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Abstract

Purpose

Equality of rights for individuals who identify as being lesbian or gay (LG) have emerged over recent years, and significant advancements have been made in recognition and support of LG rights in Ireland. Given the recent change in legal rights for the LG population, Civil Partnership 2010 and Marriage Equality 2015, this paper aims to explore the lived experience of daily occupations of LG adult’s in Ireland today, by applying an occupational justice lens.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative phenomenological research study, examined the concept of occupational justice as experienced by eight adults, who identified as being LG. Data was collected through face to face, semi-structured interviews.

Findings

Four themes capturing the complexity of each participant’s experience of daily occupations and occupational justice emerged, namely, transitions and personal journeys, celebrating differences, empowerment through occupation and inner conflict. Findings demonstrate how occupational justice is experienced as a complex, contextually embedded and dynamic process specific to each individual.

Originality/value

Future research in this area should aim to explore the experiences of both a younger and older LG population, along with those who identify as bisexual, transgender, queer or intersex to continue to raise awareness of the potential for occupational injustice within this minority population.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 February 2020

Rosanne L. Hartman and Emily G. Barber

While women perform as well as their male counterparts at work, women are drastically underrepresented in the onboarding process to senior leadership. The link between…

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3285

Abstract

Purpose

While women perform as well as their male counterparts at work, women are drastically underrepresented in the onboarding process to senior leadership. The link between occupational self-efficacy and the role it may play in how men and women make decisions about work has not been done. The purpose of this study is to examine potential differences of occupational self-efficacy, career aspirations and work engagement between women and men.

Design/methodology/approach

Online surveys were created and sent out as emails and on social network sites including Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Findings

Findings indicate that occupational self-efficacy has positive effect on career aspirations of women in the workplace. Further, there was no statistically significant difference between occupational self-efficacy and work engagement between men and women. However, men were found to have statistically significantly higher career aspirations than women do.

Research limitations/implications

While men and women do not differ in occupational self-efficacy or work engagement, men do have higher career aspirations than women do. Although women may believe they can accomplish challenging tasks in the workplace, it does not mean this belief is acted upon.

Practical implications

The study highlights the importance of occupational self-efficacy and its relation to career aspirations. Individuals who are high in occupational self-efficacy may set their own path in advancing within their career. However, individuals who are low or moderate in occupational self-efficacy may require further encouragement and development using additional resources as a catalyst for advancement guidance. While no differences were found between men and women in occupational self-efficacy, human resource practitioners should develop those individuals who are low or moderate in occupational self-efficacy with coaching, training and/or mentoring to build leadership capacity, increase self-efficacy and career-planning acumen.

Social implications

Men and women behave differently when seeking career advancement and in their career aspirations. For men, advancement is linked to performance whereas women use a multi-pronged approach focusing on preparing for career success and building role competency. Differences in strategy for advancement mean men will actively engage in behaviors to advance even when they do not have the knowledge or experience to perform in the new role. Conversely, women seek to feel competent in a work role prior to seeking it out. Finding ways to mentor women toward higher self-efficacy for their next career advancement will benefit organizations overall.

Originality/value

Research examining the role of occupational self-efficacy and its relation to career aspirations does not exist in comparing men and women.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

MacLeans A. Geo‐JaJa

Manpower planners in less‐developed countries have traditionally considered their greatest challenges to be:

Abstract

Manpower planners in less‐developed countries have traditionally considered their greatest challenges to be:

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2020

Tushar Agrawal

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interrelation between two important dimensions of gender segregation: education and occupation. It further investigates the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interrelation between two important dimensions of gender segregation: education and occupation. It further investigates the gender wage gap.

Design/methodology/approach

The author uses a three-way additive decomposition of the mutual information index – an index based on the concept of entropy. A non-parametric wage decomposition method that uses matching comparisons is used for measuring the wage gap.

Findings

The results show that the extent of gender segregation in India is higher in urban areas than that in rural areas. Most of the observed segregation in rural labour markets originates from educational outcomes, whereas in urban markets it is due to occupational profile of individuals. The findings of the wage decomposition analysis suggest that education in rural areas also explains a sizeable part of the gender wage differential. Nevertheless, a large share of the wage gap remains unexplained in both rural and urban areas.

Originality/value

While much research has looked at occupational segregation, less attention has been paid to educational segregation. The paper uses a unique approach to understand the joint effect of occupation and education in explaining gender segregation.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Geraint Johnes, Ricardo Freguglia, Gisele Spricigo and Aradhna Aggarwal

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dynamic relationship between policies related to educational provision and both educational participation and occupational

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dynamic relationship between policies related to educational provision and both educational participation and occupational outcomes in Brazil, using PNAD and RAIS-Migra data.

Design/methodology/approach

Outcomes are examined using: static multinomial logit analysis, and structural dynamic discrete choice modelling. The latter approach, coupled with the quality of the RAIS-Migra data source, allows the authors to evaluate the education policy impacts over time.

Findings

The main results show that the education level raises the propensity that the individual will be in formal sector work or still in education, and reduces the probability of the other outcomes. Transition into non-manual formal sector work following education may, however, occur via a spell of manual work.

Originality/value

This is the first study of occupational destination to be conducted in a rapidly developing country using high-quality panel data and appropriate dynamic methods, and as such makes an important contribution in confirming that increased supply of highly skilled workers enhances occupational attainment in this context.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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