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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Jinho Kim and K.J. Rogers

This paper aims to propose a framework for building a flexible supply chain business model using an object‐oriented approach.

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3797

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a framework for building a flexible supply chain business model using an object‐oriented approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed modeling framework has used the de facto object‐oriented modeling standard, Unified Modeling Language (UML), for building a supply chain model. To compensate for the potential weakness of the pure object‐oriented model and UML, the framework integrates business rules with its model.

Findings

This paper provides information about several sources, which are the bases of modeling a supply chain. The paper regards a supply chain as five view models with four business domains and each domain consists of functions, resources, processes, interactions and business rules.

Research limitations/implications

A typical manufacturing supply chain is considered as a target system to apply this design methodology. The paper does not handle a real case study as an application example.

Originality/value

This paper newly added the category of “Business Process Reengineering (BPR)‐driven” models to the traditional taxonomy of supply chain models and proposed an object‐oriented business model (OOBM) for a supply chain as one of the BPR‐driven models. It is hoped that this modeling approach is highly usable and adds value to an analyst, practitioner, and designer in the field of supply chain.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

NABIL A. KARTAM

The architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry is epitomized by a wide range of project business lines, different project scopes, unique client…

Abstract

The architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry is epitomized by a wide range of project business lines, different project scopes, unique client requirements, and a rapidly changing automation technology. This current scenario requires a constant transfer of project data among the various professionals representing different specializations, project phases and interests. The implementation of improved computer techniques such as object‐oriented programming and CAD reduces fragmentation and enhances the efficiency of integrating project data through all stages of generation, sharing, maintaining, and updating. This reduced fragmentation will assist in bridging the gaps between and within the project phases, thereby increasing the competitiveness of the AEC industry. This paper presents different issues related to the existing fragmentation in the AEC industry and the challenges and approaches to achieve a meaningful and smooth integration. The paper describes the development of ODCSI—an object‐oriented design/construction system for integrating CAD and construction software applications. The system architecture captures design data in an object‐oriented project model and acts as an intelligent CAD interface. In the hierarchy of object‐oriented classes and subclasses, the design data are inherited; hence all functional, geometrical, structural, construction management, and construction engineering functions are shared across class boundaries. These design data are used as the input to various computer‐based construction software applications, hence providing seamless project integration.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Mahmood Reza Khabbazi, Jan Wikander, Mauro Onori and Antonio Maffei

This paper introduces a schema for the product assembly feature data in an object-oriented and module-based format using Unified Modeling Language (UML). To link…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper introduces a schema for the product assembly feature data in an object-oriented and module-based format using Unified Modeling Language (UML). To link production with product design, it is essential to determine at an early stage which entities of product design and development are involved and used at the automated assembly planning and operations. To this end, it is absolutely reasonable to assign meaningful attributes to the parts’ design entities (assembly features) in a systematic and structured way. As such, this approach empowers processes such as motion planning and sequence planning in assembly design.

Design/methodology/approach

The assembly feature data requirements are studied and definitions are analyzed and redefined. Using object-oriented techniques, the assembly feature data structure and relationships are modeled based on the identified requirements as five UML packages (Part, three-dimensional (3D) models, Mating, Joint and Handling). All geometric and non-geometric design data entities endorsed with assembly design perspective are extracted or assigned from 3D models and realized through the featured entity interface class. The featured entities are then associated (used) with the mating, handling and joints features. The AssemblyFeature interface is realized through mating, handling and joint packages related to the assembly and part classes. Each package contains all relevant classes which further classify the important attributes of the main class.

Findings

This paper sets out to provide an explanatory approach using object-oriented techniques to model the schema of assembly features association and artifacts at the product design level, all of which are essential in several subsequent and parallel steps of the assembly planning process, as well as assembly feature entity assignments in design improvement cycle.

Practical implications

The practical implication based on the identified advantages can be classified in three main features: module-based design, comprehensive classification, integration. These features help the automation and solution development processes based on the proposed models much easier and systematic.

Originality/value

The proposed schema’s comprehensiveness and reliability are verified through comparisons with other works and the advantages are discussed in detail.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Mukunda G. Rajagopala, Shang‐Hsien Hsieh, Elisa D. Sotelino and Donald W. White

Motif User Interface Application (MUIApp) is an object‐oriented graphical user‐interface application framework. It simplifies the task of writing, modifying, and debugging…

Abstract

Motif User Interface Application (MUIApp) is an object‐oriented graphical user‐interface application framework. It simplifies the task of writing, modifying, and debugging window‐based applications by application of object‐oriented programming to the construction and manipulation of graphical user interface (GUI) components using a well‐established window system. The key means adopted in the design include: encapsulation of tedious X‐window programming details, construction of high‐level GUI components using Motif and Xt widgets as the primary building blocks, and definition of collaboration mechanisms between GUI components. Reports that the abstractions and mechanisms provided by MUIApp facilitate the development of graphical user interfaces for applications. Simplicity, extensibility and reusability are the key concerns in the design. MUIApp is written in C++ and runs mainly on top of Motif.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Qingyu Zhang

As manufacturing systems change from island of automation to enterprise‐wise integration, object‐oriented database and database management systems have many superior…

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2284

Abstract

As manufacturing systems change from island of automation to enterprise‐wise integration, object‐oriented database and database management systems have many superior features to meet the new requirements. Based on the comparison with relational databases, this paper discusses the selections and characteristics of the object‐oriented database and database management systems (OODBMS) in manufacturing and summarizes the current studies and applications. It helps managers to choose appropriate OODBMS products based on the degree of complexity of their firm’s entity and data items. It provides a direction for future research.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 101 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

J.E. Akin

There is a widely available object oriented (OO) programming language that is usually overlooked in the OO analysis, OO design, OO programming literature. It was designed

Abstract

There is a widely available object oriented (OO) programming language that is usually overlooked in the OO analysis, OO design, OO programming literature. It was designed with most of the features of languages like C++, Eiffel, and Smalltalk. It has extensive and efficient numerical abilities including concise array and matrix handling, like Matlab®. In addition, it is readily extended to massively parallel machines and is backed by an international ISO and ANSI standard. The language is Fortran 90 (and Fortran 95). When the explosion of books and articles on OOP began appearing in the early 1990s many of them correctly disparaged Fortran 77 (F77) for its lack of object oriented abilities and data structures. However, then and now many authors fail to realize that the then new Fortran 90 (F90) standard established a well‐planned object oriented programming language while maintaining a full backward compatibility with the old F77 standard. F90 offers strong typing, encapsulation, inheritance, multiple inheritance, polymorphism, and other features important to object oriented programming. This paper will illustrate several of these features that are important to engineering computation using OOP.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2020

John Borer

The purpose of this study is to provide a method for designing the software for a process control system that avoids difficulties that lead to safety problems.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide a method for designing the software for a process control system that avoids difficulties that lead to safety problems.

Design/methodology/approach

Design of real-time software for safety critical programmable equipment systems (PES) such as process control or shutdown systems needs to be approached quite differently compared to any other software. It must be designed by those who understand the equipment system not by software engineers who do not. Following the ‘Piper Alpha’ disaster in the North Sea in the late 1980s, it was realised that the software of safety critical PES, such as the shut-down system on an oil rig, was proving very unreliable. Earlier hardwired relay-based shut-down systems were designed by process control engineers who understood the functions the equipment was required to perform; however, by the 1980s, such systems had been replaced by PES designed by system analysts who did not understand the technologies involved. The safety critical real-time software for a programmable equipment system will only be reliable when it is designed by control engineers who understand the functions it has to perform.

Findings

Bottom-up design of software is necessary to avoid safety issues and this can only be achieved using object-oriented methods.

Originality/value

This paper describes an entirely original idea of the author based on experience of managing the design and construction of the process control, emergency shut-down and fire and gas and communication systems for a major oil and gas platform in the North Sea around the time of the Piper Alpha disaster.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 36 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

N. Bajgoric, I.K. Altinel, M. Draman and A.T. Ünal

An application development framework for a software project based on fusion as an object‐oriented application development method is presented. An object‐oriented approach…

Abstract

An application development framework for a software project based on fusion as an object‐oriented application development method is presented. An object‐oriented approach has been adopted for the design and implementation of the prototype interactive visual modelling system for building a visual presentation of a refinery process and creation of linear programming model for optimizing production decision variables. The main reason for this selection is the consideration of object‐oriented programming (OOP) as an obvious vehicle for the development of complex visual interactive modelling systems. The main dimensions of the framework are as follows: OO approach, fusion method, computer‐aided software engineering (CASE) tool, application development tool, GUI development tool, and C++ as an implementation language.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 102 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Thong‐Hwee Koh, Eng‐Wah Lee and Yong‐Tsui Lee

Apparel pattern making creates a set of pattern pieces of fabric which are sewn into the desired garment. The pattern pieces are developed through fashion analysis…

Downloads
826

Abstract

Apparel pattern making creates a set of pattern pieces of fabric which are sewn into the desired garment. The pattern pieces are developed through fashion analysis, pattern design and pattern drafting. Seeks to build an object‐oriented model of the apparel pattern‐making process through these subprocesses. Defines the model in terms of a requirements specification and subsequently uses it in the development of a computerized pattern‐making system. Uses object behaviour analysis, which is derived from object‐oriented technology, as the method for defining the model.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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