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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Tushar Jain

The overall goal of this research is to develop algorithms for feature-based recognition of 2D parts from intensity images. Most present industrial vision systems are…

Abstract

Purpose

The overall goal of this research is to develop algorithms for feature-based recognition of 2D parts from intensity images. Most present industrial vision systems are custom-designed systems, which can only handle a specific application. This is not surprising, since different applications have different geometry, different reflectance properties of the parts.

Design/methodology/approach

Computer vision recognition has attracted the attention of researchers in many application areas and has been used to solve many ranges of problems. Object recognition is a type of pattern recognition. Object recognition is widely used in the manufacturing industry for the purpose of inspection. Machine vision techniques are being applied in areas ranging from medical imaging to remote sensing, industrial inspection to document processing and nanotechnology to multimedia databases. In this work, recognition of objects manufactured in mechanical industry is considered. Mechanically manufactured parts have recognition difficulties due to manufacturing process including machine malfunctioning, tool wear and variations in raw material. This paper considers the problem of recognizing and classifying the objects of such mechanical part. Red, green and blue RGB images of five objects are used as an input. The Fourier descriptor technique is used for recognition of objects. Artificial neural network (ANN) is used for classification of five different objects. These objects are kept in different orientations for invariant rotation, translation and scaling. The feed forward neural network with back-propagation learning algorithm is used to train the network. This paper shows the effect of different network architecture and numbers of hidden nodes on the classification accuracy of objects as well as the effect of learning rate and momentum.

Findings

One important finding is that there is not any considerable change in the network performances after 500 iterations. It has been found that for data smaller network structure, smaller learning rate and momentum are required. The relative sample size also has a considerable effect on the performance of the classifier. Further studies suggest that classification accuracy is achieved with the confusion matrix of the data used. Hence, with these results the proposed system can be used efficiently for more objects. Depending upon the manufacturing product and process used, the dimension verification and surface roughness may be integrated with proposed technique to develop a comprehensive vision system. The proposed technique is also highly suitable for web inspections, which do not require dimension and roughness measurement and where desired accuracy is to be achieved at a given speed. In general, most recognition problems provide identity of object with pose estimation. Therefore, the proposed recognition (pose estimation) approach may be integrated with inspection stage.

Originality/value

This paper considers the problem of recognizing and classifying the objects of such mechanical part. RGB images of five objects are used as an input. The Fourier descriptor technique is used for recognition of objects. ANN is used for classification of five different objects. These objects are kept in different orientations for invariant rotation, translation and scaling. The feed forward neural network with back-propagation learning algorithm is used to train the network. This paper shows the effect of different network architecture and numbers of hidden nodes on the classification accuracy of objects as well as the effect of learning rate and momentum.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Unmanned Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-6427

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Hairong Jiang, Juan P. Wachs and Bradley S. Duerstock

The purpose of this paper is to develop an integrated, computer vision-based system to operate a commercial wheelchair-mounted robotic manipulator (WMRM). In addition, a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an integrated, computer vision-based system to operate a commercial wheelchair-mounted robotic manipulator (WMRM). In addition, a gesture recognition interface system was developed specially for individuals with upper-level spinal cord injuries including object tracking and face recognition to function as an efficient, hands-free WMRM controller.

Design/methodology/approach

Two Kinect® cameras were used synergistically to perform a variety of simple object retrieval tasks. One camera was used to interpret the hand gestures and locate the operator's face for object positioning, and then send those as commands to control the WMRM. The other sensor was used to automatically recognize different daily living objects selected by the subjects. An object recognition module employing the Speeded Up Robust Features algorithm was implemented and recognition results were sent as a commands for “coarse positioning” of the robotic arm near the selected object. Automatic face detection was provided as a shortcut enabling the positing of the objects close by the subject's face.

Findings

The gesture recognition interface incorporated hand detection, tracking and recognition algorithms, and yielded a recognition accuracy of 97.5 percent for an eight-gesture lexicon. Tasks’ completion time were conducted to compare manual (gestures only) and semi-manual (gestures, automatic face detection, and object recognition) WMRM control modes. The use of automatic face and object detection significantly reduced the completion times for retrieving a variety of daily living objects.

Originality/value

Integration of three computer vision modules were used to construct an effective and hand-free interface for individuals with upper-limb mobility impairments to control a WMRM.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-378X

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2018

Lin Feng, Yang Liu, Zan Li, Meng Zhang, Feilong Wang and Shenglan Liu

The purpose of this paper is to promote the efficiency of RGB-depth (RGB-D)-based object recognition in robot vision and find discriminative binary representations for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to promote the efficiency of RGB-depth (RGB-D)-based object recognition in robot vision and find discriminative binary representations for RGB-D based objects.

Design/methodology/approach

To promote the efficiency of RGB-D-based object recognition in robot vision, this paper applies hashing methods to RGB-D-based object recognition by utilizing the approximate nearest neighbors (ANN) to vote for the final result. To improve the object recognition accuracy in robot vision, an “Encoding+Selection” binary representation generation pattern is proposed. “Encoding+Selection” pattern can generate more discriminative binary representations for RGB-D-based objects. Moreover, label information is utilized to enhance the discrimination of each bit, which guarantees that the most discriminative bits can be selected.

Findings

The experiment results validate that the ANN-based voting recognition method is more efficient and effective compared to traditional recognition method in RGB-D-based object recognition for robot vision. Moreover, the effectiveness of the proposed bit selection method is also validated to be effective.

Originality/value

Hashing learning is applied to RGB-D-based object recognition, which significantly promotes the recognition efficiency for robot vision while maintaining high recognition accuracy. Besides, the “Encoding+Selection” pattern is utilized in the process of binary encoding, which effectively enhances the discrimination of binary representations for objects.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Yelda Turkan, Frédéric Bosché, Carl T. Haas and Ralph Haas

Previous research has shown that “Scan-vs-BIM” object recognition systems, which fuse three dimensional (3D) point clouds from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) or digital…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has shown that “Scan-vs-BIM” object recognition systems, which fuse three dimensional (3D) point clouds from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) or digital photogrammetry with 4D project building information models (BIM), provide valuable information for tracking construction works. However, until now, the potential of these systems has been demonstrated for tracking progress of permanent structural works only; no work has been reported yet on tracking secondary or temporary structures. For structural concrete work, temporary structures include formwork, scaffolding and shoring, while secondary components include rebar. Together, they constitute most of the earned value in concrete work. The impact of tracking secondary and temporary objects would thus be added veracity and detail to earned value calculations, and subsequently better project control and performance. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Two techniques for recognizing concrete construction secondary and temporary objects in TLS point clouds are implemented and tested using real-life data collected from a reinforced concrete building construction site. Both techniques represent significant innovative extensions of existing “Scan-vs-BIM” object recognition frameworks.

Findings

The experimental results show that it is feasible to recognise secondary and temporary objects in TLS point clouds with good accuracy using the two novel techniques; but it is envisaged that superior results could be achieved by using additional cues such as colour and 3D edge information.

Originality/value

This article makes valuable contributions to the problem of detecting and tracking secondary and temporary objects in 3D point clouds. The power of Scan-vs-BIM object recognition approaches to address this problem is demonstrated, but their limitations are also highlighted.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Ajmal Saeed Mian, Mohammed Bennamoun and Robyn Owens

In model‐based recognition the 3D models of objects are stored in a model library during an offline phase. During the online recognition phase, a view of the scene is…

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Abstract

Purpose

In model‐based recognition the 3D models of objects are stored in a model library during an offline phase. During the online recognition phase, a view of the scene is matched with the model library to identify the location and pose of certain library objects in the scene. Aims to focus on the process of 3D modeling and model‐based recognition.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses the process of 3D modeling and model‐based recognition along with their potential applications in industry with a particular emphasis on robot grasp analysis. The paper also emphasises the main challenges in these areas and give a brief literature review.

Findings

In order to develop an automatic 3D model‐based object recognition system it is necessary to automate the process of 3D modeling and recognition. The challenge in automating the 3D modeling process is to develop an automatic correspondence technique. The core of recognition is the representation scheme. Recognition is an online process. Therefore, representation and matching must be very fast in order to facilitate real time recognition.

Practical implications

There are numerous applications of 3D modeling in a variety of areas ranging from the entertainment industry to industrial automation. Some of its applications include computer graphics, virtual reality, medical imaging, reverse engineering, and 3D terrain construction.

Originality/value

Provides information on 3D modeling which constitutes an important part of computer vision or robot vision.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Pilar Arques, Francisco A. Pujol, Faraón Llorens, Mar Pujol and Ramón Rizo

One of the main goals of vision systems is to recognize objects in real world to perform appropriate actions. This implies the ability of handling objects and, moreover…

Abstract

Purpose

One of the main goals of vision systems is to recognize objects in real world to perform appropriate actions. This implies the ability of handling objects and, moreover, to know the relations between these objects and their environment in what we call scenes. Most of the time, navigation in unknown environments is difficult due to a lack of easily identifiable landmarks. Hence, in this work, some geometric features to identify objects are considered. Firstly, a Markov random field segmentation approach is implemented. Then, the key factor for the recognition is the calculation of the so‐called distance histograms, which relate the distances between the border points to the mass center for each object in a scene.

Design/methodology/approach

This work, first discusses the features to be analyzed in order to create a reliable database for a proper recognition of the objects in a scene. Then, a robust classification system is designed and finally some experiments are completed to show that the recognition system can be utilized in a real‐world operation.

Findings

The results of the experiments show that including this distance information improves significantly the final classification process.

Originality/value

This paper describes an object recognition scheme, where a set of histograms is included to the features vector. As is shown, the incorporation of this feature improves the robustness of the system and the recognition rate.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Tushar Jain, Meenu Gupta and H.K. Sardana

The field of machine vision, or computer vision, has been growing at fast pace. The growth in this field, unlike most established fields, has been both in breadth and…

Abstract

Purpose

The field of machine vision, or computer vision, has been growing at fast pace. The growth in this field, unlike most established fields, has been both in breadth and depth of concepts and techniques. Machine vision techniques are being applied in areas ranging from medical imaging to remote sensing, industrial inspection to document processing and nanotechnology to multimedia databases. The goal of a machine vision system is to create a model of the real world from images. Computer vision recognition has attracted the attention of researchers in many application areas and has been used to solve many ranges of problems. The purpose of this paper is to consider recognition of objects manufactured in mechanical industry. Mechanically manufactured parts have recognition difficulties due to manufacturing process including machine malfunctioning, tool wear and variations in raw material. This paper considers the problem of recognizing and classifying the objects of such parts. RGB images of five objects are used as an input. The Fourier descriptor technique is used for recognition of objects. Artificial neural network (ANN) is used for classification of five different objects. These objects are kept in different orientations for invariant rotation, translation and scaling. The feed forward neural network with back-propagation learning algorithm is used to train the network. This paper shows the effect of different network architecture and numbers of hidden nodes on the classification accuracy of objects.

Design/methodology/approach

The overall goal of this research is to develop algorithms for feature-based recognition of 2D parts from intensity images. Most present industrial vision systems are custom-designed systems, which can only handle a specific application. This is not surprising, since different applications have different geometry, different reflectance properties of the parts.

Findings

Classification accuracy is affected by the changing network architecture. ANN is computationally demanding and slow. A total of 20 hidden nodes network structure produced the best results at 500 iterations (90 percent accuracy based on overall accuracy and 87.50 percent based on κ coefficient). So, 20 hidden nodes are selected for further analysis. The learning rate is set to 0.1, and momentum term used is 0.2 that give the best results architectures. The confusion matrix also shows the accuracy of the classifier. Hence, with these results the proposed system can be used efficiently for more objects.

Originality/value

After calculating the variation of overall accuracy with different network architectures, the results of different configuration of the sample size of 50 testing images are taken. Table II shows the results of the confusion matrix obtained on these testing samples of objects.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Unmanned Systems, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-6427

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2019

John Oyekan, Axel Fischer, Windo Hutabarat, Christopher Turner and Ashutosh Tiwari

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role that computer vision can play within new industrial paradigms such as Industry 4.0 and in particular to support production…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role that computer vision can play within new industrial paradigms such as Industry 4.0 and in particular to support production line improvements to achieve flexible manufacturing. As Industry 4.0 requires “big data”, it is accepted that computer vision could be one of the tools for its capture and efficient analysis. RGB-D data gathered from real-time machine vision systems such as Kinect ® can be processed using computer vision techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

This research exploits RGB-D cameras such as Kinect® to investigate the feasibility of using computer vision techniques to track the progress of a manual assembly task on a production line. Several techniques to track the progress of a manual assembly task are presented. The use of CAD model files to track the manufacturing tasks is also outlined.

Findings

This research has found that RGB-D cameras can be suitable for object recognition within an industrial environment if a number of constraints are considered or different devices/techniques combined. Furthermore, through the use of a HMM inspired state-based workflow, the algorithm presented in this paper is computationally tractable.

Originality/value

Processing of data from robust and cheap real-time machine vision systems could bring increased understanding of production line features. In addition, new techniques that enable the progress tracking of manual assembly sequences may be defined through the further analysis of such visual data. The approaches explored within this paper make a contribution to the utilisation of visual information “big data” sets for more efficient and automated production.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Ajmal Saeed Mian, Mohammed Bennamoun and Robyn Owens

In this paper, we review the process of “3D modeling” and “model‐based recognition” along with their potential industrial applications. We put a particular emphasis on the…

Abstract

In this paper, we review the process of “3D modeling” and “model‐based recognition” along with their potential industrial applications. We put a particular emphasis on the case scenario of robot grasp analysis for which 3D model‐based object recognition seems to be a more palpable choice compared with the conventional tactile sensors solutions. We also put a particular emphasis on the main challenges in the areas of 3D modeling and model‐based recognition and give a brief literature review of the latest research that was carried out to respond to these challenges.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2017

Delowar Hossain, Genci Capi, Mitsuru Jindai and Shin-ichiro Kaneko

Development of autonomous robot manipulator for human-robot assembly tasks is a key component to reach high effectiveness. In such tasks, the robot real-time object

Abstract

Purpose

Development of autonomous robot manipulator for human-robot assembly tasks is a key component to reach high effectiveness. In such tasks, the robot real-time object recognition is crucial. In addition, the need for simple and safe teaching techniques need to be considered, because: small size robot manipulators’ presence in everyday life environments is increasing requiring non-expert operators to teach the robot; and in small size applications, the operator has to teach several different motions in a short time.

Design/methodology/approach

For object recognition, the authors propose a deep belief neural network (DBNN)-based approach. The captured camera image is used as the input of the DBNN. The DBNN extracts the object features in the intermediate layers. In addition, the authors developed three teaching systems which utilize iPhone; haptic; and Kinect devices.

Findings

The object recognition by DBNN is robust for real-time applications. The robot picks up the object required by the user and places it in the target location. Three developed teaching systems are easy to use by non-experienced subjects, and they show different performance in terms of time to complete the task and accuracy.

Practical implications

The proposed method can ease the use of robot manipulators helping non-experienced users completing different assembly tasks.

Originality/value

This work applies DBNN for object recognition and three intuitive systems for teaching robot manipulators.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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