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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Ling Xu, Jingjing Zhang and Qinhua Zheng

After the official definition of Open Educational Resources (OER) at the Forum on Open Courseware for Higher Education in Developing Countries in 2002, the concept was…

Abstract

Purpose

After the official definition of Open Educational Resources (OER) at the Forum on Open Courseware for Higher Education in Developing Countries in 2002, the concept was soon introduced to China and popularised among scholars, practitioners, and educators. After ten years of proliferation, it is important to explore the landscape of Chinese OER research. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts social network analysis (SNA) to analyse the network defining the citations of 133 OER journal articles published in China.

Findings

The findings illustrate that the academic circle of OER in China is small, which leads to restricted innovation. Most publications are produced by researchers working at comprehensive universities and normal universities (teachers colleges).

Research limitations/implications

In these universities, a number of active OER researchers are emerging, but no OER research team can be identified from their citation networks. Currently, most OER research is still descriptive research, and only few case studies are being to gradually be conducted.

Practical implications

As the Chinese OER research is still in the initial stage, more research projects in OER need to be explored to construct higher quality and more influential open content to achieve deep openness.

Originality/value

In the literature, no one has adopted the SNA to analyse the citation network of Chinese OER research.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Eileen A. Horn, Ryan Anderson and Kristine Pierick

This study aims to describe how open educational resources (OERs) were used in a system-wide, competency-based higher education program. It discusses barriers encountered…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to describe how open educational resources (OERs) were used in a system-wide, competency-based higher education program. It discusses barriers encountered, solutions developed and suggestions for future research on OER-focused curricula for self-directed learners. The case demonstrates practical application of the best practices for OER usage and contributes to discussions among the open education community about what constitutes quality OERs and how quality measures can help instructors select the best available OER.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study uses a reflective approach to describe what the organization did to facilitate OER use in University of Wisconsin Flexible Option. The authors reflect on tools and processes used and highlight alignment with best practices from OER literature.

Findings

This case confirms that there are challenges associated with OERs, especially for faculty with limited experience using them. It also offers insights into how to evaluate and curate OERs and confirms that students are generally satisfied when OERs are used as primary learning resources.

Research limitations/implications

Formal research was not conducted. This case provides a starting point for potential future research about the use of OERs by self-directed, competency-based students.

Practical implications

Practical implications of this case study include concrete tools and methods faculty and instructional designers can use to locate, evaluate and curate OERs. This case study highlights the role OERs can play in increasing overall satisfaction with learning resources while decreasing students’ costs.

Originality/value

This case ties unique needs of self-directed, competency-based learners with the use of OERs, addressing two overarching questions about OERs: what constitutes a quality OER? and how is quality measured?

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

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Publication date: 19 August 2020

Patrina Law, Anna Page and Rosie Storrar

The Open University (OU) United Kingdom manages two platforms for hosting Open Educational Resources (OER): OpenLearn, delivering the OU’s OER, reaching over10 million…

Abstract

The Open University (OU) United Kingdom manages two platforms for hosting Open Educational Resources (OER): OpenLearn, delivering the OU’s OER, reaching over10 million learners a year, attracting a mostly UK audience, and OpenLearn Create, reaching 3 million learners a year, where anyone can create and share OER, attracting a mostly international – non-UK – audience. Both platforms release OER using a Creative Commons license and afford accessibility to learning materials specifically catering to the needs of underserved groups, in other words, individuals or groups who may have limited access to education or continuing professional development (CPD) either as recipient or as educator. Using case studies, research data analytics and survey data, this chapter reveals how the approach to delivering OER on OpenLearn Create fosters community engagement and outreach across a broad spectrum of projects in a range of languages and format often to those with restricted access to professional development within organizations. The chapter discusses weaknesses in the platform’s usability for delivering online courses, but strengths and recommendations for its use as an adaptable project-based tool. Research data also reveal that where an institution is prepared to minimally support the provision of such a platform, the contribution to humanizing education for OER projects globally is great.

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Marisa Petrich

This study aims to outline a library-led open educational resource (OER) training program for faculty and an assessment of barriers to OER adoption on campus. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to outline a library-led open educational resource (OER) training program for faculty and an assessment of barriers to OER adoption on campus. This study examines program assessment data (including faculty-reported needs to increase the likelihood of OER adoption) and analyzes a community-focused outreach strategy for a new OER program.

Design/methodology/approach

This program took a user-centered approach to developing campus support services for OER that specifically sought to address local needs and challenges. It intentionally incorporated strategies related to faculty motivation and satisfaction.

Findings

Although this faculty incentive program did not require OER adoption, a high number of voluntary OER adoptions occurred and participants showed interest in sharing information about OER across campus. Information about barriers to adoption informed future services.

Practical implications

This paper presents an adaptable model to launch new OER services and encourage a culture of using affordable course materials.

Originality/value

This project gathered information and identified collaborators to help build a sustainable, community-oriented OER program. The program focused early efforts on collecting and incorporating stakeholder feedback rather than moving directly to strategies focused on adopting or creating OER. It offers a model for other libraries to follow in creating sustainable practices.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2020

Maura Valentino and Geri Hopkins

This study aims to describe a project that aims to give students a choice to complete their general education requirements without purchasing a textbook.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to describe a project that aims to give students a choice to complete their general education requirements without purchasing a textbook.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 26 faculty, teaching in the new general education curriculum, at Central Washington University were given stipends to eliminate expensive textbooks and use free to the student resources such as open educational resources (OER) or library resources. The data was collected on student savings and student and faculty satisfaction with the program.

Findings

Many paths were created through the general education curriculum, so a student may easily finish these requirements without purchasing a textbook. The data from this case study coincide with the literature on the subject. Faculty found it fairly easy to replace their required textbooks with pedagogically sound, free resources. Students were relieved to have some financial relief and found the resources to be good. The student’s biggest complaint was that faculty often use very small portions of expensive required textbooks.

Research limitations/implications

This is a case study and the results are limited as such. This is one university and one general education curriculum. Also, if an academic library wants to replicate this case study, some funding is required.

Practical implications

Students struggle financially and alleviating the costs of textbooks is one-way librarians can ease that burden.

Social implications

Students struggle financially and alleviating the costs of textbooks is one-way librarians can ease that burden.

Originality/value

There have been some case studies written about OER, where 8 or 10 courses are replaced. There are studies written about zero-textbook-cost degrees at community colleges, but this case study explores a textbook-cost-free general education program at a state university.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Merinda McLure and Caroline Sinkinson

This paper aims to examine librarians’ professional motivations and theoretical perspectives to attend to care and student voice, as they pursue open educational resource …

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine librarians’ professional motivations and theoretical perspectives to attend to care and student voice, as they pursue open educational resource (OER) initiatives in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine OER initiatives that serve as models for their work at the University of Colorado Boulder (CU Boulder), describe how they have attended to care and student voice in their work to date and reflect on how they hope to continue to do so in their future OER initiatives.

Findings

The authors find connections between theoretical perspectives for care in education and the values and ethics of both the open education movement and librarianship. They propose that these connections provide a foundation for librarians to align their professional motivations and practices in support of learning. The authors provide examples of OER programming that attend to care and student voice and offer related strategies for practitioners to consider.

Originality/value

Librarians at many post-secondary institutions provide critical advocacy and support the adoption, adaptation and creation of OER in higher education. Theories of care, values and ethics in the open education movement and librarianship provide a foundation for librarians to attend to care and elevate student voice as they undertake OER advocacy and initiatives.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2020

Andrew Joseph Walsh

This paper aims to examine the role of the library at a large, urban community college in the institution’s textbook affordability initiatives.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the role of the library at a large, urban community college in the institution’s textbook affordability initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study details the contributions of the Sinclair Community College library to affordability on campus, including participating in a major open educational resources (OER) grant initiative; providing consulting and support for faculty and staff; and providing leadership for training and outreach relating to other affordability measures.

Findings

The library’s efforts have significantly contributed to Sinclair’s widespread adoption of OER and other alternate textbook models that have saved over $1.5m for students annually.

Originality/value

This paper is a valuable contribution to the affordability discussion because of the degree to which Sinclair has adopted OER; the role of librarians collaborating with key stakeholders; and its focus on the community college population, a diverse and fast-growing sector with particular needs and challenges.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2020

Ariana Santiago and Lauren Ray

The purpose of this paper is to describe programs that support open educational resources (OER) publishing in academic libraries. Insights, opportunities and challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe programs that support open educational resources (OER) publishing in academic libraries. Insights, opportunities and challenges are shared in relation to the broader open education movement.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides two case studies describing the development of OER publishing programs at large, public research universities – the University of Houston and the University of Washington. Each program takes an Author DIY approach to publishing support and is in the early years of supporting OER adoption and creation.

Findings

These case studies demonstrate the need for a greater focus on decision-making and workflows. They illuminate challenges and opportunities for librarians supporting OER initiatives, including adapting existing models of OER publishing, navigating institutional culture, moving OER programs beyond affordability and how to sustain and scale OER programs with shifting institutional support.

Originality/value

OER is an emerging program area within academic libraries, and much of the focus has been on outreach and advocacy around affordable alternatives to commercial textbooks. Little has been written about programmatic initiatives to support OER publishing. This paper adds unique examples to the OER literature and raises new questions around support for OER publishing.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Jennifer Van Allen and Stacy Katz

Open Educational Resources (OER) are learning materials openly licensed so that others may retain, reuse, revise, remix or redistribute (the 5Rs) these materials. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Open Educational Resources (OER) are learning materials openly licensed so that others may retain, reuse, revise, remix or redistribute (the 5Rs) these materials. This paper aims to raise awareness of OER by providing a rationale for using these learning materials and a strategy for educators to get started with OER during the collective crisis and beyond.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a broad research base and anecdotes from personal experience, the authors make the case that OER improves student access to learning materials and improves the learning experience in both PK-12 and higher education contexts.

Findings

The authors define and describe the benefits of OER to provide practical suggestions educators can implement during the pandemic and beyond.

Practical implications

To support educators in finding and using OER, this paper highlights repositories that include a breadth of various learning materials across subject areas and educational contexts. The authors provide specific suggestions for finding, personalizing and contextualizing OER.

Originality/value

This work not only provides an overview of OER with particular considerations for educators during the COVID-19 pandemic but also makes the case that OER should be integrated into classrooms beyond the pandemic.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 14 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2020

Maximus Gorky Sembiring and Gayuh Rahayu

This paper aims to explore the origins of providing quality satisfied open educational resources (QS-OER) related to Making Indonesia 4.0. It was aimed at exploring…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the origins of providing quality satisfied open educational resources (QS-OER) related to Making Indonesia 4.0. It was aimed at exploring plausible determinants perceived by faculty. It was also of interest to reveal how, in what routines associated factors were interrelated.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory design was used. A conceptual framework was first established through a literature review and focus group discussion. Conceptually, QS-OER included presage, pattern, process, product, practicability, prospective and power (7Ps). QS-OER had direct effects on hard, soft, social and life skills (4Ss). The operational framework was then established with 7Ps, QS-OER and 4Ss as independent, moderating and dependent variables, respectively. The population of 631 from Universitas Terbuka faculty was included in the study. Respondents were randomly chosen to accumulate data through a survey. Methodically, importance–performance analysis (IPA) and customer-satisfaction index (CSI) were emulated to measure satisfaction level and importance degree. Eleven hypotheses were assessed under structural equation modeling.

Findings

Seven hypotheses were validated following 211 returned responses from respondents. Product was the most influential factor to QS-OER, followed by power, practicability, pattern and prospective, whereas presage and process were excluded. QS-OER influenced hard and soft skills, but social and life skills were excluded. IPA-CSI chart identified 21 (of 32) attributes as the pillars of QS-OER.

Originality/value

The quantitative framework was statistically dependable despite two of nine cut-off values that are slightly below the goodness-of-fit criteria. The study recognized the variance of qualitative versus quantitative results. Further inquiry is vital to diminish divergence by incorporating more relevant methods, augmenting theoretical exposures and/or enlarging sample size/population.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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