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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1953

EDITH B. PH.D SCHNAPPER

It was in 1945 that O. E. Deutsch, the well‐known musical bibliographer, first put forward a plea for a British Union Catalogue of Old Music. Other branches of knowledge…

Abstract

It was in 1945 that O. E. Deutsch, the well‐known musical bibliographer, first put forward a plea for a British Union Catalogue of Old Music. Other branches of knowledge had provided themselves with just such an invaluable instrument of research as a Union Catalogue presents, why not music? There were lively discussions at that time in the music room of the University Library, Cambridge, where D. R. Wakeling, then music librarian, was an ardent supporter of the scheme right from the start. Two things were clear: (1) there was an urgent need for a comprehensive list of music, British and foreign, which would show the location of the works of the old masters in their various editions; and (2) there could not be any doubt that the British libraries possessed a great wealth of musical treasures but that it was for the most part untapped. In fact, the knowledge of the extent and state of the different music collections in Britain was, with a few exceptions, more than sketchy; in many cases it was nil. This lack of information presented one of the biggest problems right from the start; for how should such a vast scheme be tackled when one was almost completely ignorant of its scope? It was proposed to take as a basis the collection of pre‐1800 music in the British Museum, as catalogued in two volumes by W. Barclay Squire and published in 1912, and to work from an interleaved copy of this catalogue which, it was thought, would be sufficient to accommodate all additional entries. Discussions, articles, and meetings followed and in 1946 the actual work of compilation was taken in hand. It was due above all to the generous gift made by the late Gerald Cooper, himself a keen music enthusiast and an original member of the Council up to his death in 1947, that the initial funds necessary for such an ambitious undertaking were provided. These were supplemented in October 1952 by liberal financial support from the Pilgrim Trust which, it is hoped, will enable the work to be carried through to its successful conclusion. A Council was formed in 1946 with the late Canon E. H. Fellowes, the great musical scholar, as its chairman. C. B. Oldman, the Principal Keeper of Printed Books in the British Museum, who has served as honorary Treasurer from the very beginning, took over the chairmanship after Canon Fellowes's death in 1951. Following Th. Besterman and F. C. Francis, A. Hyatt King, Assistant Keeper in charge of the Collections of Printed Music in the British Museum, became honorary Secretary to the Council in 1948. O. E. Deutsch was appointed editor and was succeeded in 1950 by the present writer.

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1946

O.E. DEUTSCH

Part II and last MECHETTI. Vienna FOUNDED in 1795 by Carlo Mechetti as a dealer; since 1807 in partnership with his nephew, Pietro; the publishing firm styled Carlo…

Abstract

Part II and last MECHETTI. Vienna FOUNDED in 1795 by Carlo Mechetti as a dealer; since 1807 in partnership with his nephew, Pietro; the publishing firm styled Carlo Mechetti & Neffe in 1809; after Carlo's death in 1811, Pietro became sole owner; he was succeeded in 1850 by his widow, Therese; c. 1855 the firm was taken over by A. Diabelli & co. (cp. Peter Cappi).

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1946

O.E. DEUTSCH

On the invitation of the Editor I am publishing in the JOURNAL OF DOCUMENTATION a selection of lists of music publishers' numbers, with an indication of the date of issue…

Abstract

On the invitation of the Editor I am publishing in the JOURNAL OF DOCUMENTATION a selection of lists of music publishers' numbers, with an indication of the date of issue of their publications so numbered.

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1958

ELSEWHERE in this number we list libraries which have Esent us copies of their annual reports which we are glad to have. Now and again we are able to elaborate on these…

Abstract

ELSEWHERE in this number we list libraries which have Esent us copies of their annual reports which we are glad to have. Now and again we are able to elaborate on these, but in the present issue that has not been possible. We would say, however, that these reports are deserving of the attention of librarians generally, and of students at the library schools. They are records of work in progress, and they do suggest the development of library policy. The best of them are of textbook value.

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Library Review, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1945

O.E. DEUTSCH

Comparisons between continental and British music libraries on the one hand and British and American on the other give evidence of the richness of Great Britain in the…

Abstract

Comparisons between continental and British music libraries on the one hand and British and American on the other give evidence of the richness of Great Britain in the field of old printed music. Even here there is little realization or adequate means of knowing the extent of this wealth. Not that the older catalogues of the continent, especially in Italy, Austria, Germany, and France, or the newer ones of America, are much better, more consistent, or up to date than the British, although they are probably more numerous. On the whole the music libraries abroad are, however, better known—at least in their own countries. In this connexion we are not so much concerned with national music as with great music of all nations; the extent of the latter only is open to comparison. No difficulty would arise in gaining knowledge of a nation's accumulation of incunabula, collected in the general and the special libraries: there are lists proudly showing the national wealth in this sphere, and the British catalogues of incunabula are, perhaps, the best in the world. But it is nearly impossible to get, from the few existing printed music catalogues, exact knowledge about the distribution of rare music. The enterprise of R. Eitner, about 1900, in publishing single‐handed in ten volumes a world catalogue of old music partially failed because for the most part he undertook the task of collecting his titles by correspondence. He was handicapped also by the fact that the best catalogues were published only after he had completed his work. His references to music in Britain were collected without visiting the libraries and are very incomplete.

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1964

CANADA, until the last generation or two, has been basically a pioneer country but two world wars have changed all this and the economy has moved from an agricultural to a…

Abstract

CANADA, until the last generation or two, has been basically a pioneer country but two world wars have changed all this and the economy has moved from an agricultural to a manufacturing community able to provide a standard of living second to that of the United States. (At the present time only 10.8 per cent of Canadians live on farms according to the 1961 census.) Natural resources, such as timber, wheat and mining, continue to play, however, an important role in the life of the nation. As in most developing and pioneer countries, learning has had to assume a secondary role compared with other enterprises and activities. This is gradually beginning to change as more people continue in school and the percentage of individuals attending university increases. Established organizations, like the National Film Board and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, catering to mass culture, have been strengthened and enlarged and new establishments, like the Canada Council and the Stratford Shakespearean Festival, of narrower function and appeal, have been set up. The Library movement, not the least of learning agencies, is gaining strength every day. In this paper some of the interesting new developments of the last ten years in the latter field will be discussed. Of necessity, much is abbreviated; a lot is ignored. Data selected has been based on the most recent sources; hence the variety in dates.

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New Library World, vol. 65 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1955

CECIL HOPKINSON

Before I arrive at discussing the fundamentals of music bibliography I think we should take a very close look at the word ‘bibliography’ and make sure that we know what it…

Abstract

Before I arrive at discussing the fundamentals of music bibliography I think we should take a very close look at the word ‘bibliography’ and make sure that we know what it really means. In countless books and dictionaries I have looked up the definition, and the general consensus of opinion is that it may have two meanings. Firstly, a list of books relating to a given subject or author and, secondly, the careful and accurate description of certain books, either by an author or on a specific subject, with literal transcriptions of the title‐pages, sufficient information for identification between one edition or issue and another, size, gatherings, pages, measurements, and so forth. This is a fact of which I need not remind a company of librarians, but I want to make a clear distinction between the two forms that a bibliography may have. Personally, I do not care for the first meaning at all and can never stretch my imagination so far as to flatter a mere list of books by calling it a bibliography. It is not a bibliography at all, it is a checklist, a simple list of books for guidance to the reader wanting to refer to other books on the same subject or, alternatively, by the same author. In Mr. Arundell Esdaile's A student's manual of bibliography (Allen & Unwin, 1931) all such are called ‘List of Books’, and this, I maintain, is the correct heading. A bibliography is something far larger, more involved, intricate, and detailed. The new Grove uses the word ‘bibliography’ for a list of books about a composer, and a list of works composed by the composer is designated ‘Catalogue of Works’.

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Abstract

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Reference Reviews, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Ya‐Ru Chen and Allan H. Church

This review article focuses on the factors that affect the selection and implementation of three principles of distributive justice (i.e., equity, equality, and need) to…

1088

Abstract

This review article focuses on the factors that affect the selection and implementation of three principles of distributive justice (i.e., equity, equality, and need) to reward systems in group and organizational settings. After presenting an overview of the assumptions, goals, and possible consequences associated with each of the three perspectives, the article then describes the moderating factors influencing distribution rule preferences across four levels of analysis: (1) the interorganizational, (2) the intraorganizational, (3) the work group, and (4) the individual. Some of the variables discussed include cross‐cultural differences, reward system implementation, task interdependency, work group climate, and individual characteristics. This material is then summarized through the use of a new conceptual model for describing allocation rule preferences. The article concludes with suggestions for future research.

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International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Martin C. Euwema, Evert Van de Vliert and Arnold B. Bakker

In this observation study the theory of conglomerated conflict behavior is tested. The impact of seven conflict behaviors on substantive and relational conflict outcomes…

1142

Abstract

In this observation study the theory of conglomerated conflict behavior is tested. The impact of seven conflict behaviors on substantive and relational conflict outcomes is examined through multiple independent observations of 103 Dutch nurse managers handling a standardized conflict. Results show that process controlling is most important for achieving substantive outcomes, whereas problem solving, confronting, and forcing are most important for relational outcomes. In addition, substantive and relational outcomes are positively related. Implications for managerial practice and training are discussed.

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International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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