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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Ilija Djekic and Nada Smigic

– This paper aims to present results from a research that analyzed the quality of labels available in the Serbian food market and consumers’ attitudes toward food labels.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present results from a research that analyzed the quality of labels available in the Serbian food market and consumers’ attitudes toward food labels.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 899 food labels have been analyzed in relation to the presence of legally required information, their readability to average consumer and presence of nutritional/health claims and/or nutritional information. In parallel, 400 respondents were interviewed in the survey of consumers’ attitudes regarding labels.

Findings

Results revealed that 38.2 per cent of food products hold labels that are not fully readable to average consumers. Regarding basic label information, 11 per cent of foods have missing information in terms of series/lot identification. The majority of the products (87.4 per cent) have only basic nutritional information with 4.6 per cent of products holding nutritional claims. Consumers with active sport activities showed higher awareness of nutritional information. There were no statistically significant differences between smokers and non-smokers regarding their attitudes toward nutritional information. Age and education play a significant role in ranking nutritional facts. The most important nutritional information is fat content, followed by sugar and vitamins.

Research limitations/implications

The nature of the study did not allow conclusions regarding causal relationship between food products and consumers as well as if nutritional information affects consumers’ choices and purchasing patronage.

Originality/value

The findings of this study are worthy, as they report the Serbian consumers’ understanding of labels and nutritional information as well as the status food labels sold in the Serbian market.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Dan Petrovici, Andrew Fearne, Rodolfo M. Nayga and Dimitris Drolias

The primary purpose is to examine the factors that affect the use of nutritional facts, nutrient content claims and health claims on food label use in the United Kingdom.

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Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose is to examine the factors that affect the use of nutritional facts, nutrient content claims and health claims on food label use in the United Kingdom.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports the results of a survey of over 300 face‐to‐face interviews with shoppers of Asda, Morrisons and Sainsbury – three of the major supermarkets in the UK.

Findings

Product class involvement factors, individual characteristics, health‐related factors (nutritional knowledge, health locus of control, perceived need of dietary change), situational, attitudinal and behavioral factors were found to be significant factors affecting the use of nutritional information and nutritional and health claims on food labeling. While the use of nutritional information and health claims increases with the stated importance of “nutrition” and “family preferences”, it is less likely among shoppers for whom “taste” is an important driver of food purchasing behaviour. There is also evidence of mistrust in health claims, as indicated by the negative relationship between the consideration of such claims and the stated importance of “quality” and perceived need to “change dietary quality” – the more discerning shoppers are the least likely to consider health claims.

Originality/value

The study provides evidence that a wider range of product class involvement factors is necessary to predict the use of nutritional information and nutritional and health claims on food labeling. It also offers a conceptualization of health‐related factors to include health locus of control as a predictor of the acquisition of nutrition and health information.

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2010

Sandra C. Jones and Amanda Reid

Given the role that food marketing plays in influencing dietary patterns in children, the aim of this article is to explore the internet‐based marketing tactics employed…

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Abstract

Purpose

Given the role that food marketing plays in influencing dietary patterns in children, the aim of this article is to explore the internet‐based marketing tactics employed by eight leading Australian food companies that produce and distribute foods that are predominantly consumed by children.

Design/methodology/approach

The marketing policies and child‐targeted internet marketing practices of eight major Australian food companies were examined.

Findings

Seven of the eight food companies have web sites or sections of sites that are devoted to children and/or teenagers; with downloadable materials and extensive direct marketing. Of most concern was the collection of detailed personal information from children and/or teenagers, which was evident on the web sites of five of the seven food companies that have such sites.

Research limitations/implications

This study examined only eight Australia food companies, so the findings cannot be generalized to other companies, or companies in other countries. The study was conducted at a specific point in time and, given rapid changes in internet marketing, it is likely that new strategies and messages will have emerged since data collection.

Originality/value

The article provides a unique snapshot of internet marketing practices of a sample of Australian food companies targeting children and adolescents, and raises important issues for discussion regarding the appropriateness and ethics of some of these practices.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Torben Hansen, Ashesh Mukherjee and Thyra Uth Thomsen

This paper aims to investigate the effect of anxiety on information search during food choice and to test a key moderator of the effect of anxiety on search, namely…

2207

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of anxiety on information search during food choice and to test a key moderator of the effect of anxiety on search, namely attitude towards nutritional claims.

Design/methodology/approach

By means of qualitative study the paper investigates the notion that consumers experience anxiety about health outcomes during food choice. Further, by means of structural equation modelling based on two studies with representative samples of Danish consumers, the paper investigates the effects outlined above.

Findings

The authors show that anxiety during food choice increases information search in four product categories – ready dinner meals, salad dressing, biscuits, and cakes. Further, the results show that the positive effect of anxiety on information search is stronger when consumers have a less favourable attitude towards nutritional claims on the product label.

Practical implications

The results suggest that anxiety during food choice is desirable from the consumer welfare point of view since it leads to more informed consumers. The results also indicate that public policy makers should educate consumers to be critical about nutritional claims, since this would increase consumers' propensity to search for health information. In turn, from a managerial point of view this suggests that providers of healthy food should provide extended health information for consumers that are sceptical about nutritional claims since their scepticism towards this type of condensed information will in fact motivate extended information search.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to research in marketing on food choice and consumption: a consumption area that is important but difficult to navigate due to an increasing complexity of nutritional information at the point of sale. This paper demonstrates that situational, choice‐based anxiety and scepticism towards nutritional claims may actually be good things by prompting consumers to undertake search, and hence ultimately make more informed choices.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2020

Benedetta Grandi, Maria Grazia Cardinali and Silvia Bellini

The wide literature about healthy behaviours posits that a high level of self-control is required in order to make healthy choices. This work intends to demonstrate that…

Abstract

Purpose

The wide literature about healthy behaviours posits that a high level of self-control is required in order to make healthy choices. This work intends to demonstrate that retailers, through the management of in-store marketing levers, can influence shopping behaviour, no matter which is the individual tendency to engage in cognitive behaviours. For this specific purpose, we have considered participants' “Need for Cognition” as a proxy of self-control.

Design/methodology/approach

With reference to a specific category (cookies), we created a new display based on benefits (healthy eating) rather than products' attributes. A pre-test was conducted before the main experiment in order to assess the potential ability of the new nutritional display to help customers selecting healthier products, by testing participants' awareness and comprehension of the stimuli proposed. Then, an online between-subjects experiment was conducted by simulating the shoppers' expedition in the cookies' aisle inside a store with the aim to demonstrate that healthy choices can be also made on impulse.

Findings

Our findings showed that when both communication and visual cues are provided, people low in need for cognition (NFC) are more willing to select healthy products from the shelf, compared with people high in NFC.

Originality/value

While there is a wide literature explaining the mechanisms supporting healthy choices, fewer are the contributions about the role of retailers in promoting healthy eating through in-store marketing levers. More important, there is no contribution about how to promote health among people with low level of self-control.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1979

Paul Fieldhouse

The importance of nutrition in the aetiology and treatment of disease has long been recognised. However, in general, medical education and practice has not kept abreast of…

Abstract

The importance of nutrition in the aetiology and treatment of disease has long been recognised. However, in general, medical education and practice has not kept abreast of the tremendous advances in nutritional knowledge. Authorities in many countries have commented on the inadequate recognition, support and attention given to the subject of nutrition in medical schools. The need for nutrition education to students and to practising doctors has been repeatedly emphasised in the USA, where steps have been taken to implement suitable programmes. In the United Kingdom scant attention has been directed toward an evaluation of the current situation and little has been achieved in promoting nutrition education within the medical profession.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 79 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Stephen L. Baglione, Louis A. Tucci and John L. Stanton

The purpose of this study is to determine whether reported nutritional knowledge and the acceptance of benefit claims for a fresh produce item is related to changes in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine whether reported nutritional knowledge and the acceptance of benefit claims for a fresh produce item is related to changes in preference in order to provide food marketers insight and guidance into giving consumers more information to change beliefs and preferences, using health‐benefit claims to position their brands as offering ingredients, e.g. Lycopene which may prevent serious illnesses such as heart disease and cancer.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample was drawn from an internet panel maintained by Markettools, Inc, a respected market research company in the USA. A total of 594 respondents were surveyed. Besides demographic questions, respondents were asked about their knowledge of nine nutrients. Basic nutrient knowledge was estimated through a one‐sample t‐test tested against a value of two on a 1‐4 scale. Respondents evaluated eight benefit statements regarding the health benefits of mushrooms. After reading each statement, respondents indicated their likelihood of purchasing fresh mushrooms and were asked about the believability, favorability, and uniqueness of each statement.

Findings

The results indicate that health‐related food benefit claims are better accepted by female respondents who claim to be nutritionally knowledgeable and who are older. Three hypotheses related to nutritional knowledge and beliefs showed that knowledge and beliefs have an effect but the effect varied by nutrient and nutrient cluster. In particular, knowledge of esoteric nutrients such as Pantothenic Acid was associated with acceptance of health‐related claims.

Practical implications

Food marketers are spending millions of dollars/pounds/euros on informing people of the nutrient content and health benefits of their foods. However, this money can be better spent if one first understands the existing levels of nutritional knowledge and the specific nutrients that motivate change in preference or buying intention.

Originality/value

This paper builds on the existing body of knowledge using additional statistical techniques to cluster nutrients and to provide a demonstration on a fresh produce food group not currently investigated in the literature. It suggests that food marketers need to gather more information on their consumers to target their health and nutrition message to the proper (more receptive) audience.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Irma Tikkanen and Leila Jaakkola

The purpose of this paper is to explore evaluating the nutritional quality of menus by using software in professional kitchens.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore evaluating the nutritional quality of menus by using software in professional kitchens.

Design/methodology/approach

Nutritional quality and the core factors used when evaluating the nutritional quality of menus are discussed. The empirical data were collected in 2008 by theme interviewing nine municipal food service employees. The data were analysed by a thematic analysis.

Findings

The results indicated that both positive and contributing factors emerged as follows: productisation of menu; using a plate model; length of a control period concerning the nutritional quality of the menu; checking the nutrition content when making changes in menus, dishes and food items; dealing with the results of the evaluation in the meetings; including the results in the service agreements; employers' positive attitude displayed towards software suppliers' training; including nutritional quality as a part of service quality; and implementing nutritional quality according to the job descriptions.

Practical implications

A variety of courses should be offered for the students concerning the guidance of food production by using software in professional kitchens; integrating working life into the curriculum; continuous training of the food service personnel; and cooperation with the professional kitchen's software suppliers. Moreover, further implications could involve, for example, developing and diffusing the national model for the nutritional quality follow‐up; and taking the Sinfos‐product information data bank into use.

Originality/value

Active updating of the software and training of the employees are needed in order to ensure the nutritional quality of menus.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Jackie Goode, Alan Beardsworth, Cheryl Haslam, Teresa Keil and Emma Sherratt

Reports new research into stability and change in contemporaryfoodways. Uses survey and in‐depth interviews to uncover familiarfeatures which could be described as…

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Abstract

Reports new research into stability and change in contemporary foodways. Uses survey and in‐depth interviews to uncover familiar features which could be described as traditional, as well as more novel patterns. Highlights the ways in which the two are interwoven. The picture is characterized by a number of serious nutritional concerns, including health, weight control, food safety and food ethics. There is also familiarity with official nutritional guidelines, despite a widespread perception of contradictory and confusing nutritional messages. Finds mistrust of farmers, food companies and the government as far as the provision of safe food for the public is concerned. Such negative findings by no means represent the whole picture, however. Shows that, in the midst of such perceived contradiction and mistrust of external agencies, there is a personal confidence in dietary decision making and pleasure in food and eating.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 June 2022

M. Rizwana, Padmalini Singh, N. Ahalya and T. Mohanasundaram

The goal of the present study is to examine the degree of knowledge amongst Indian women about millet grain and its nutritional advantages. Millet is regarded to be five…

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of the present study is to examine the degree of knowledge amongst Indian women about millet grain and its nutritional advantages. Millet is regarded to be five times more nutritious than rice and wheat. Despite the fact that millet contributes to 10% of India's food grain basket and has an annual production of 18 million tonnes, it is not consumed in the same proportion as mainstream cereals (that is rice and wheat). As a result, the study's primary objective is to determine the level of awareness and consumption pattern of millet amongst Indian women regarding millet grains.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was carried out in the city of Bengaluru in the state of Karnataka, India. For the purpose of study, a sample of 855 female respondents was approached using a non-probability sampling technique known as convenience sampling. The data were gathered through the use of a self-administered structured questionnaire.

Findings

According to the findings of the study, the vast majority of respondents consume millet for preserving overall health. Building self and family immunity is the most important factor with 4.11 mean scores and low standard deviation of 0.985. The results reveal that 80.6% of women in the study are aware of millet but only 62.7% of women are consuming millet. The motivating factors and demotivating factors leading to consumption and non-consumption behaviour, respectively have also been identified. The study also reveals that demographic factors such as age, qualification and income have a direct influence on millet consumption.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of research can be extended to explore the impact of millet consumption on long term health benefits of millet amongst the target respondents. Further, the study can be extended to explore the consumption pattern of millet among different target audience in various parts of India. The media interventions in creating awareness of millet consumption benefits need to be studied for increasing the consumption of millet.

Practical implications

Companies involved in producing Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) products can be encouraged to produce millet based foods like cereals, biscuits, ready to eat foods etc. Workshops can be organized to raise awareness on how the millet can replace traditional grains in the cooking process.

Social implications

Policy measures may include millet being promoted through technology dissemination, creating awareness about advantages of millet and including millet in the Public Distribution System (PDS). It is also important to promote the cultivation, maintenance and processing of the local variety of millet with competent marketing strategies so as to increase their cultivation comparable to the cash crops. Farmers should be educated on the importance of cultivation of minor millet.

Originality/value

The fast-paced lifestyle of urban Indians has a direct impact on their dietary preferences. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that people have a nutritionally balanced diet and engage in regular physical activity to reduce health risks. In India, as a result of women's increased participation in the workforce, women are forced to manage many tasks and obligations, which has detrimental effects on their health. The poor nutritional status of modern-day workers is attributed to a lack of education, lack of awareness and a general disregard for health-related concerns. There is a need to investigate if Indian women are aware of the nutritional benefits of millet grains that are higher in protein.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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