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Article

Huseyin Ates

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of elementary school teachers’ psychological factors on their behavioral intentions for healthy nutrition in their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of elementary school teachers’ psychological factors on their behavioral intentions for healthy nutrition in their daily life within an extended version of the theory of planned behavior (TPB).

Design/methodology/approach

The design of the study is correlation study.

Findings

Constructs in the proposal model formed accounted for of variance of intentions and behaviors successfully. Considering the entire proposed model, while personal norm is the most influential factor on intention, self-identity is the most consistent effects on teachers’ behavior. However, among the constructs of TPB, perceived behavioral control is the strongest influence on both intention and behavior.

Originality/value

In the literature, factors affecting healthy behaviors by using TPB focused on mainly children (8–10 year old) and adolescents (11–16 year old) all over the world. However, in some countries, several studies were conducted on adults (e.g. Astrøsm and Rise, 2001; Brouwer and Mosack, 2015), to the best of our knowledge, while there is no study conducted on adults including teachers in Turkey. In addition, recently, two meta-analysis studies were published: Riebl et al. (2015) and Mcdermott et al. (2015). These studies suggested that future studies related to healthy nutrition in the scope of TPB should be continued to investigate.

Details

Health Education, vol. 119 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Mahshid Pirouznia

Eating behaviors of children and adolescents are important in establishing adults’ preferences and behaviors. Nutrition knowledge is one of the factors that could…

Abstract

Eating behaviors of children and adolescents are important in establishing adults’ preferences and behaviors. Nutrition knowledge is one of the factors that could influence an adolescent’s eating behavior. Therefore the relationship between nutrition knowledge and eating behaviors of adolescents was examined in this research project. The participants were students from a middle school in Ohio. The students were asked to answer a questionnaire CANKAP (Comprehensive Assessment of Nutrition Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices), which measured nutrition knowledge and eating behavior. The results indicated that the relationship between nutrition knowledge and eating behavior was insignificant for sixth grade students, but significant for seventh and eighth grade students. The students were not able to identify the food sources of nutrients or nutrient functions, and they did not use a daily food guide to choose foods, although they were aware of the importance of milk and vegetable consumption. The findings in this study will add to the limited research data currently defining the relationship between nutrition knowledge and the eating behaviors of middle school students.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article

Stojan Kostanjevec, Janez Jerman and Verena Koch

Children's eating habits are influenced by numerous social and individual factors. The present study aimed to evaluate the connection between nutrition knowledge of…

Abstract

Purpose

Children's eating habits are influenced by numerous social and individual factors. The present study aimed to evaluate the connection between nutrition knowledge of children and their eating habits as well as their attitudes towards healthy eating habits.

Design/methodology/approach

The research study included 630 11-year-old children from 27 randomly selected Slovenian schools. During the research, children attended the sixth grade of the nine-year elementary school and on average were subject to 38.6 h of mandatory nutritional contents, which are planned in the curriculum of home economics. At the end of the school year, nutrition knowledge was checked with a knowledge test consisting of 27 questions. Considering the achieved results, children were classified into three knowledge categories: low, fairly good, and good nutrition knowledge. Children's eating habits were assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire, while the five-degree Likert scale was used to assess their attitudes to healthy eating habits. Differences in children's eating habits and attitudes in reference to the category of knowledge were determined through analysis of variance.

Findings

The results demonstrated that children with better nutrition knowledge have healthier eating habits and a more positive attitude towards them than children with poor nutrition knowledge.

Originality/value

The study results demonstrate the link between children's nutrition knowledge and attitudes on the one hand and eating habits on the other which justifies the importance of providing formal and informal nutrition education to children.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article

Mojisola D. Kupolati, Una E. MacIntyre and Gerda J. Gericke

The aim of this review is to critically assess published articles on school-based nutrition education (NE) intervention to identify factors hindering or contributing to…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this review is to critically assess published articles on school-based nutrition education (NE) intervention to identify factors hindering or contributing to the success of interventions. School-based NE possesses the capacity to influence learners’ nutrition behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

An electronic search of articles was conducted in Medline, PubMed, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases, Google and snowballing. Included in the review were school-based studies with classroom NE with or without nutrition services and studies published between 2000 and 2013. School-based non-intervention studies and interventions that did not include a nutrition teaching component were excluded in the review.

Findings

Thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Features of successful NE interventions included the use of behavioural theories, especially the social cognitive theory and the involvement of trained teachers in the implementation of interventions. Capacity development for teachers, time constraints, school policies and implementation problems of multicomponent interventions were some of the identified challenges encountered in the studies reviewed.

Originality/value

Trained teachers are invaluable assets in interventions to improve nutrition behaviours of learners. Challenges associated with teacher-oriented school-based NE intervention can be overcome by properly designed and implemented interventions based on behavioural theory.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article

Arthur Meidan and Thabet A. Edris

Analysis of British consumers′ actual usage of nutrition labelsraises critical questions regarding public policy decisions to provideconsumers with nutrition information…

Abstract

Analysis of British consumers′ actual usage of nutrition labels raises critical questions regarding public policy decisions to provide consumers with nutrition information. Multiple Discriminant Analysis reveals that consumers vary significantly in their use of nutrition labels in food choice. On the basis of psychographic and sociodemographic characteristics, three district consumer segments (i.e. heavy users, light users and non‐users) were identified. The results indicate that 55 per cent of British consumers are likely to be non‐users of nutrition labels. Non‐users are less educated, have lower family incomes and can be either younger or older than users. They are oriented to price and bargain rather than quality and nutrition. The implications of these findings for public policy are discussed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 92 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Jungjin Hwang

The purpose of this study is: to examine how the nutrient ad disclosures (i.e. absolute and evaluative disclosure) of fast food menu items influence consumers' evaluation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is: to examine how the nutrient ad disclosures (i.e. absolute and evaluative disclosure) of fast food menu items influence consumers' evaluation behaviors of those foods; to investigate how consumers' subjective nutrition knowledge and BMI influence their evaluation behaviors of fast food meals with nutrient ad disclosures.

Design/methodology/approach

Two 2×2 experiment designs were used to investigate the influences of nutrient ad disclosures, subjective nutrition knowledge, and BMI on consumers' evaluation behavior.

Findings

The findings indicate that: the evaluative disclosure led to significantly less favorable consumer evaluations of selected fast food menu items than did the absolute disclosure; consumers who had high subjective nutrition knowledge and who were low BMI (i.e. people who have normal BMI) conducted significantly more critical evaluations of focal fast food meals with nutrient ad disclosures than did their counterparts.

Practical implications

Those findings imply that policy makers should develop a new format of nutrition information on fast food meals based on the evaluative disclosure in order to help consumers choose healthful foods.

Originality/value

Even though the effectiveness of the new menu-labeling regulation of the fast food industry is still controversial, only a few studies have been conducted to find a more effective nutrition information format than the current format. Thus, this study provides valuable implications to policy makers in terms of developing a more effective nutrition information format.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Anthony R. Dissen, Peggy Policastro, Virginia Quick and Carol Byrd‐Bredbenner

Little is known about interrelationships among nutrition knowledge, attitude, dietary intake, and body satisfaction, which are important variables that play a role in…

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about interrelationships among nutrition knowledge, attitude, dietary intake, and body satisfaction, which are important variables that play a role in nutrition education interventions. This paper aims to focus on these interrelationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Students (n=279; 20.12±1.75SD years) enrolled at a large northeastern US university took an online survey. The survey contained a nutrition knowledge scale, attitude scale, food frequency scales, body areas satisfaction subscale, and demographic characteristics questions. To determine relationships, correlation coefficients were computed, along with forward stepwise regression to identify predictors of each study measure.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from a non‐probability sample in one geographical area at one time point.

Findings

In males, significant positive correlations were found between fruit/vegetable servings and attitudes, knowledge, body satisfaction; and between knowledge and attitudes. Stepwise multiple regression analysis found fruit/vegetable servings and percent calories from fat significantly predicted attitudes, while in females attitude was a significant predictor variable for knowledge, fruit/vegetable servings, and percent of calories from fat. Among females, significant positive correlations occurred between attitudes and knowledge, and fruit/vegetable servings and attitudes.

Practical implications

Nutrition and health interventions should incorporate lessons that work to improve one's attitudes toward nutrition. Interventions targeted to males should aim to increase nutrition knowledge, while interventions targeted to females should focus on nutrition knowledge and attitudes.

Originality/value

This paper expands on what is known about young adults and key cognitive factors that influence their nutrition knowledge, attitudes, dietary intake, and body satisfaction. Nutrition educators can utilize the study findings to inform future nutrition interventions.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Pi-Chuan Sun, Hsien-Long Huang and Fang-Yi Chu

The purpose of this paper is to examine how health consciousness and nutrition self-efficacy influence attitudes towards and use of nutrition labels, the moderating effect…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how health consciousness and nutrition self-efficacy influence attitudes towards and use of nutrition labels, the moderating effect of nutrition knowledge between health consciousness and nutrition label attitude, and the impact of the consumer’s ethical evaluation of a business on nutrition label use.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes an integrative model that includes health consciousness, nutrition self-efficacy, nutrition knowledge, nutrition label attitude, ethical evaluation, and nutrition label use. Empirical data were collected from a famous website in Taiwan by a non-ordered questionnaire to decrease the priming effect, and 306 valid questionnaires were collected. The collected data were analysed using SPSS and AMOS software.

Findings

The results show that both health consciousness and nutrition self-efficacy have direct effects on nutrition label attitude, and this attitude will influence label use. There is a moderating effect of nutrition knowledge, in terms of both subjective and objective nutrition label knowledge, between health consciousness and nutrition label attitude. However, the moderating effect in the low nutrition label knowledge group is slightly greater than in the high nutrition label knowledge group. The consumer’s ethical evaluation of businesses affects nutrition label use.

Originality/value

This study is the first to indicate that nutrition label knowledge, both subjective and objective, will moderate the relationship between consumers’ health consciousness and their attitude towards nutrition labels. Furthermore, this study affirms the relationship between the consumer’s ethical evaluation of a firm and nutrition label use.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Ulya Faupel, Vanessa Haselhoff, Miriam Ziesak and Hartmut H. Holzmüller

Altering eating habits are leading to an increase in child obesity rates, especially in lower social class. One possible prevention activity is the implementation of a…

Abstract

Purpose

Altering eating habits are leading to an increase in child obesity rates, especially in lower social class. One possible prevention activity is the implementation of a quality label for children's food. Therefore, this paper seeks to investigate parents' food choice criteria in light of social standing to deduce the possible impact of such a quality label.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 15 qualitative interviews were conducted with parents of different social class. Topics discussed were general diets, grocery shopping behaviour and attitudes towards food quality labels.

Findings

Results indicate that parents have similar choice criteria independent of their social class, e.g. quality, price, brand and children's preferences. Nutrition panels and quality labels are not of highest importance. Nonetheless, a need for information exists and their involvement in child nutrition seems to determine the possible impact of quality labels.

Research limitations/implications

The qualitative methodology can be seen as a limitation of the study. The influence of involvement has to be further analysed.

Originality/value

Some research on the influence of quality labels in general and on family decision-making when shopping for food and with regard to differences in social class does exist. This study contributes to existing research by combining these research streams.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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Article

Neha Rathi, Lynn Riddell and Anthony Worsley

School-based nutrition education programmes have the potential to reinforce healthy dietary behaviours in adolescents. The purpose of this paper is to understand the views…

Abstract

Purpose

School-based nutrition education programmes have the potential to reinforce healthy dietary behaviours in adolescents. The purpose of this paper is to understand the views of secondary school students in Kolkata, India, regarding the food and nutrition curriculum, food skill acquisition at school and home and barriers to learning food skills.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample of 1,026 year nine students was drawn from nine private, English-speaking secondary schools in Kolkata, India to participate in a cross-sectional, self-reported paper-based survey. Data analyses including descriptive statistics and χ2 analyses were performed.

Findings

The majority of the respondents (65.3 per cent) were female. Biology, Home Science and Life skills classes were the main places in which students acquired food and nutrition knowledge. Almost two-thirds of the respondents acknowledged the importance of acquiring food-related knowledge and skills. Approximately half (48.3 per cent) reported that the food and nutrition curriculum involved excessive memorisation while around the same proportion described the curriculum as interesting (47 per cent) and easy to comprehend (50.3 per cent). However, relatively few students said they enjoyed attending food and nutrition classes (38.7 per cent). Only a minority reported receiving food skills training, i.e. cooking skills (23 per cent), meal planning skills and food purchasing skills (12.3 per cent) at school. Despite some parental support received at home, time constraints (50.5 per cent) and lack of interest (26.3 per cent) were cited as prominent barriers to learning food skills.

Practical implications

These data underscore the need for a skills-focussed food and nutrition curriculum to improve Indian adolescents’ food-related skills, nutritional knowledge and dietary behaviours.

Originality/value

This is the first cross-sectional survey to investigate the delivery of nutrition education and food skills in the Indian school context.

Details

Health Education, vol. 117 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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