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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Carol Byrd‐Bredbenner, Angela Wong and Peta Cottee

This study evaluated and compared the abilities of women (n = 50) between the ages of 25 and 45 residing in the UK to locate and manipulate information on nutrition labels…

3434

Abstract

This study evaluated and compared the abilities of women (n = 50) between the ages of 25 and 45 residing in the UK to locate and manipulate information on nutrition labels prepared in accordance with US regulations (i.e. Nutrition Facts labels) and those prepared in accordance with the EU Directive and UK Food Labelling Regulations 1996. It also assessed their ability to assess the accuracy of nutrient content claims. Study findings indicate that the women could locate and manipulate information on both labels equally well. However, they were significantly more able to assess nutrient content claims using the Nutrition Facts label. The research findings suggest EU labelling changes that may facilitate consumer use of labels in making dietary planning decisions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2013

My Bui, Velitchka D. Kaltcheva, Anthony Patino and Richard C. Leventhal

– This research aims to examine the effects of varying front-of-package (FOP) nutrition information type on parents' food product choices for children.

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Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine the effects of varying front-of-package (FOP) nutrition information type on parents' food product choices for children.

Design/methodology/approach

A 3(FOP nutrition information: nutrient specific system vs food group information system vs summary indicator system) × 3(Perceived healthiness of the product: high vs moderate vs low) mixed-design experiment and content analysis were conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Findings suggest that summary indicator systems were effective in positively impacting parents' choices for healthier food options, however not as effective as food group information systems – which includes specific nutrient content claims complementing less familiar health nutrient symbols.

Originality/value

Implications for marketers, consumer welfare advocates and product brand managers are provided.

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Stephen L. Baglione, Louis A. Tucci and John L. Stanton

The purpose of this study is to determine whether reported nutritional knowledge and the acceptance of benefit claims for a fresh produce item is related to changes in…

1830

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine whether reported nutritional knowledge and the acceptance of benefit claims for a fresh produce item is related to changes in preference in order to provide food marketers insight and guidance into giving consumers more information to change beliefs and preferences, using health‐benefit claims to position their brands as offering ingredients, e.g. Lycopene which may prevent serious illnesses such as heart disease and cancer.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample was drawn from an internet panel maintained by Markettools, Inc, a respected market research company in the USA. A total of 594 respondents were surveyed. Besides demographic questions, respondents were asked about their knowledge of nine nutrients. Basic nutrient knowledge was estimated through a one‐sample t‐test tested against a value of two on a 1‐4 scale. Respondents evaluated eight benefit statements regarding the health benefits of mushrooms. After reading each statement, respondents indicated their likelihood of purchasing fresh mushrooms and were asked about the believability, favorability, and uniqueness of each statement.

Findings

The results indicate that health‐related food benefit claims are better accepted by female respondents who claim to be nutritionally knowledgeable and who are older. Three hypotheses related to nutritional knowledge and beliefs showed that knowledge and beliefs have an effect but the effect varied by nutrient and nutrient cluster. In particular, knowledge of esoteric nutrients such as Pantothenic Acid was associated with acceptance of health‐related claims.

Practical implications

Food marketers are spending millions of dollars/pounds/euros on informing people of the nutrient content and health benefits of their foods. However, this money can be better spent if one first understands the existing levels of nutritional knowledge and the specific nutrients that motivate change in preference or buying intention.

Originality/value

This paper builds on the existing body of knowledge using additional statistical techniques to cluster nutrients and to provide a demonstration on a fresh produce food group not currently investigated in the literature. It suggests that food marketers need to gather more information on their consumers to target their health and nutrition message to the proper (more receptive) audience.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

May O. Lwin

The purpose of this paper is to fulfil gaps in knowledge regarding food packaging practices in Southeast Asia by examining the informational content of food labels on a…

1336

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to fulfil gaps in knowledge regarding food packaging practices in Southeast Asia by examining the informational content of food labels on a variety of packaged foods.

Design/methodology/approach

Using local and imported food products found in supermarkets in Singapore, a quantitative content analysis of food label claims in a wide range of packaged food products was conducted. A codebook was developed to capture the attributes of the food labels and claims, content categories, product names, food categories, sources of manufacture and countries of brand origin. The three main regions of analysis of country of manufacture were the USA, European Union (EU) and Southeast Asia.

Findings

Analysis of food products manufactured in five Southeast Asian countries revealed the presence of various claims in food products, and a number of specific claims exceeded the percentages found in products from the USA or EU. The results showed that a significant proportion of products from Southeast Asian countries display nutrient content and nutrient function claims, as well as general marketing claims and non-nutrient claims. However, there were variations in practice amongst the five Southeast Asian countries.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was limited in being collected from one geographic location. Future research needs to expand data collection both geographically and longitudinally.

Practical implications

The findings are valuable for the national health authorities in addressing policies on food package labelling, and homogenization efforts pertaining to regional/international labelling policies. These in turn could influence food marketing practices.

Social implications

The findings are useful in crafting educational programming and guidelines for health and nutrition education.

Originality/value

This research is the first to explore food labelling practices in multiple Southeast Asian countries and compare them cross-sectionally with EU and US practices.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1988

T.R. Kirk and U. Arens

Recent interest in nutrition has provoked the use of this subject in the labelling and marketing of food products. Current legislation and guidelines pertaining to this…

Abstract

Recent interest in nutrition has provoked the use of this subject in the labelling and marketing of food products. Current legislation and guidelines pertaining to this area are examined. The importance of nutritional labelling and claims, in supporting efforts by health education staff in promoting nutrition awareness, is described.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 90 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Waleska Nishida, Ana Carolina Fernandes, Marcela Boro Veiros, David Alejandro González Chica and Rossana Pacheco da Costa Proença

The purpose of this paper is to compare the sodium content displayed on the labels of conventional processed food products (C) and of those with nutrition claims

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the sodium content displayed on the labels of conventional processed food products (C) and of those with nutrition claims suggesting the absence or reduced levels of nutrients (AR).

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional study analyzing the ingredients list, nutrition facts and nutrition claims on food labels. Subjects: all processed food products with added salt or additives containing sodium that were for sale in a large supermarket in Brazil from October to December 2011.

Findings

All 3,449 products were analyzed and categorized into 66 groups according to Brazilian legislation. The median of sodium content in the AR was 42.7 percent higher than in the C (p=0.007). In 33.3 percent of the groups there was difference in sodium content between AR and C (p < 0.05) and in 68.2 percent of these the sodium content was higher in AR. The variation range of sodium in products from the same group reached 2,905.0 mg in C and 1,712.0 mg in AR. Even when the median of sodium was lower in the AR, the minimum sodium values were lower in the C.

Originality/value

Comparisons of sodium content of conventional and AR processed food are scarce in the literature, especially covering all food for sale in a large supermarket. To the best of the knowledge, this is the first census making this comparisons in Latin America.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2009

Gönül Söyler and Sedef Nehir El

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how Turkish consumers’ attitudes toward grammatical styles of the same nutrition message affect persuasiveness; to determine…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how Turkish consumers’ attitudes toward grammatical styles of the same nutrition message affect persuasiveness; to determine the consumers’ ability to comply with the nutrition messages and to know possible health benefits of them; and to examine nutrient claims on food packages with information that will help consumers to make healthy diet choices.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire, comprising eight different grammatical styles of a nutrition message for each kind of food or food products, is applied to randomly to 207 subjects. Another questionnaire is designed including nutritional messages. Subjects (n = 200) are asked about their frequency of compliance and how this behavior is beneficial to health. In total, 5,200 food products are scanned for nutrition labels on packages in four hypermarkets. All the nutrient claims found are recorded as well as the wording.

Findings

There are significant effects of grammatical style on persuasiveness, except for meat products. Subjects report that rhetorical question using “how about” in the third message provokes them most. High proportions of subjects have heard of the written nutrition recommendations before. However subjects’ frequencies of compliance with recommendations are low. The relation between compliance and knowledge scores for message 1, 2, 3 and 4 are significant (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05). Of 5,200 foods scanned, 266 foods are recorded for nutrient claims. Fat claims are the most frequent type of nutrient claims; 71 foods have numerical claims; 179 foods have adjectival claims and 16 have both claims.

Originality/value

There have not been any studies on frequency of application of nutrition labeling, consumer attitudes and knowledge of nutrition messages regarding Turkey.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Christelle Bou-Mitri, Lama Khnaisser, Mira Bou Ghanem, Samar Merhi, Jessy El-Hayek Fares, Jacqueline Doumit and Antoine G. Farhat

This study aims to assess the exposure of Lebanese consumers to nutrition and health claims (NHCs) on pre-packed bread.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the exposure of Lebanese consumers to nutrition and health claims (NHCs) on pre-packed bread.

Design/methodology/approach

Bread samples (n = 354) from all the bakeries (n = 44) located in Mount Lebanon, between 2017 and 2018, were assessed. Breads with nutrition claims were analyzed using standard methods. A cross-sectional study was also conducted among 400 supermarket shoppers.

Findings

Results showed that among the collected samples of bread (n = 354), 59.6 per cent carried at least one claim, 47.2 per cent had non-nutrient claims, 32.5 per cent had nutrition claims and 15.3 per cent presented health claims. Claims related to sugar, salt and fiber content were the most commonly used (28.8 , 16.4 and 14.7 per cent, respectively). NHCs were mostly present on whole wheat bread. Breads with claims were more expensive. Half of the participants (49.8 per cent) relied on NHCs whenever purchasing bread, especially females (OR = 2.35, 95 per cent CI = 1.44-3.84, p = 0.001), those following a specific diet (OR = 4.56, 95 per cent CI = 2.02-10.25, p < 0.001) and those with the lowest household income (OR = 0.795, 95 per cent CI = 0.639-0.989, p = 0.040).

Originality/value

The overall findings showed that Lebanese consumers are highly exposed to NHCs, especially those at higher risk which could lead to serious public health issues if their use is not strictly regulated and controlled. Moreover, NHCs could be used as a tool to increase consumers’ awareness and help them make healthier choices during shopping.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Rafaela Corrêa Pereira, Michel Cardoso de Angelis-Pereira and João de Deus Souza Carneiro

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the packaged food market in Brazil by examining the use of nutrition and health claims and marketing techniques, as well as the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the packaged food market in Brazil by examining the use of nutrition and health claims and marketing techniques, as well as the different levels of industrial food processing in relation to product category, nutrition information and price.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted on the labels of pre-packed foods and non-alcoholic beverages marketed in a home-shopping website in Brazil.

Findings

The authors showed that the use of nutrition and health claims on packaged foods in Brazil is widespread and varied across different food categories. Marketing techniques were also prevalent, and techniques emphasising general health, well-being or naturalness were the most frequent type used. Overall, products carrying nutrition and health claims and/or using marketing techniques had lower content of fat and higher content of fibre. However, the high prevalence of these strategies in ultra-processed foods is alarming. The presence of health claims and use of marketing techniques was not found to be an effective modifier of the three price measures. However, processed and ultra-processed foods were more expensive than unprocessed foods when considering price per energy and price per 100 g or mL.

Originality/value

These results indicate that there are clear opportunities to improve the packaged food environment in supermarkets. It is important to highlight the need to develop public policies to address these issues, including restriction of the promotion and advertising of unhealthy foods and beverages and use of warning labels.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 October 2008

Heather Schofield and Sendhil Mullainathan

The purpose of this paper is to explore consumer thinking about nutrition decisions and how firms can use consumers’ awareness of the links between nutrients and health…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to explore consumer thinking about nutrition decisions and how firms can use consumers’ awareness of the links between nutrients and health generated by public health messages to market products, including ones, which have little nutritional value. We approach this issue by tracking the development of public health messages based on scientific research, dissemination of those messages in the popular press, and use of nutrition claims in food advertisements to assess whether firms are timing the use of nutrition claims to take advantage of heuristic-based decision-making. Our findings suggest that the timing of the development of nutrition information, its dissemination in the press, and use in advertising accords well with a heuristic processing model in which firms take advantage of associations between nutrient information and health in their advertisements. However, the demonstrated relationships may not be causal. Further research will be needed to provide stronger and more comprehensive evidence regarding the proposed message hijacking process. If the message hijacking framework is borne out: (1) simple overall health rating scales could significantly improve consumer decision-making, (2) the impact of misleading advertisements could be mitigated by encouraging a multidimensional view of nutrition, and (3) more intensive regulation of product labeling could limit the impact of hijacked messages.

Overall, this paper considers a novel hypothesis about the impact of public health messages on nutrition and health.

Details

Beyond Health Insurance: Public Policy to Improve Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-181-7

1 – 10 of over 1000