Search results

1 – 10 of over 26000
Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Mansoureh Z. Tafreshi, Mehrnoosh Pazargadi and Zhila Abed Saeedi

Quality of health care is the degree of the most optimal degree of health outcomes by delivery of effective, efficient and cost‐benefit professional health services to…

2714

Abstract

Purpose

Quality of health care is the degree of the most optimal degree of health outcomes by delivery of effective, efficient and cost‐benefit professional health services to people and communities. As nurses are the largest groups among health care professionals and are legally liable and morally responsible for their care, thus their perspective on quality of nursing care is important. The purpose of this qualitative study is “to define and describe quality from the perspective of nursing experts and clinical nurses”.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper data were collected in two phases (ten individual interviews and five focus group discussions). A total of 44 clinical nurses and ten nursing experts participated through a purposeful sampling frame. Data analysis was conducted by latent content analysis to achieve a definition of nursing care quality.

Findings

The findings in this paper show that, according to similarities and differences between nursing experts' and clinical nurses' perspectives on quality, the final definition is “delivery of safety care based on nursing standards which eventuates in patient satisfaction”. Findings reveal that in nurses' perspectives on quality definition two important aspects have been mostly considered: “standard of care” and “patient satisfaction”. Moreover, both participant groups have emphasized the benefits of collaborative work in health care (teamwork). Further in this study, organizational and socio‐cultural roles in delivering quality nursing care have been mentioned such as staffing, budget, leadership, and social perspectives about nursing as a highly educated profession.

Originality/value

The paper offers an overview of nurses' perspectives of quality of nursing care in Iran.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Colin Hardy

Hampshire County Council, the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Strategic Health Authority and the seven primary care trusts in the County Council area have formed a partnership…

Abstract

Hampshire County Council, the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Strategic Health Authority and the seven primary care trusts in the County Council area have formed a partnership to create additional nursing care capacity. This paper examines the background, identifies an approach to modelling the need for nursing home places and addresses the partnerships being put in place to create additional capacity in the public sector.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Empirical Nursing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-814-9

Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2007

Jean Giles-Sims and Charles Lockhart

The “baby-boom” generation is poised for retirement. Yet the American states exhibit sharp inequalities in the public support they provide for nursing facility long-term…

Abstract

The “baby-boom” generation is poised for retirement. Yet the American states exhibit sharp inequalities in the public support they provide for nursing facility long-term care for the elderly, a form of health care that few Americans can afford to purchase privately. Further, remarkable disparities exist, both within and among states, in the quality of nursing facility care. We describe cross-state variation in Medicaid support for and the quality of nursing facility care, offer regression models that provisionally explain the sources of these inequalities, comment on the social implications of these disparities and recommend a solution.

Details

Inequalities and Disparities in Health Care and Health: Concerns of Patients, Providers and Insurers
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1474-4

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

Suzanne M. Rice, Andrew Van Slobbe and Danny Rathgeber

There is increasing evidence in the literature that patient outcome is strongly linked to the quality of nursing care. In practice, the process of measuring the quality of…

1893

Abstract

Purpose

There is increasing evidence in the literature that patient outcome is strongly linked to the quality of nursing care. In practice, the process of measuring the quality of nursing care is complex and multifaceted as it is dependent not only on the skills and practices of the individual nurse, but also on the professional and organisational structure that is practised within. The expert panel concept was developed to address clinical standards and practice at The Royal Melbourne Hospital. The Nursing Expert Panel's purpose was to evaluate nursing practice, identify practice deficits, highlight areas of clinical innovation and excellence, and make recommendations where appropriate to improve patient outcome. The aim of this paper is to investigate this.

Design/methodology/approach

A pilot programme to evaluate eight clinical areas was developed and implemented. The key areas of evaluation included clinical care as well as the managerial and professional practices that support patient care. The Expert Panel, consisting of predominantly nursing staff, was recruited from within the organisation. During the evaluation, the panel collected qualitative and quantitative data using a variety of data collection tools. Data were then analysed and recommendations developed.

Findings

Five common themes of practice deficit were identified during the pilot period and the development of strategies for practice improvement is in progress.

Originality/value

Following successful implementation of the pilot phase, the Nursing Expert Panel process is now being implemented across the organisation. With ongoing evaluation and improvement of the Expert Panel Process, this quality initiative will become the foundation of nursing standards and practice evaluation at this organisation.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 24 December 2021

Sabina De Rosis, Chiara Barchielli, Milena Vainieri and Nicola Bellé

User experience is key for measuring and improving the quality of services, especially in high personal and relation-intensive sectors, such as healthcare. However…

Abstract

Purpose

User experience is key for measuring and improving the quality of services, especially in high personal and relation-intensive sectors, such as healthcare. However, evidence on whether and how the organizational model of healthcare service delivery can affect the patient experience is at an early stage. This study investigates the relationship between healthcare service provision models and patient experience by focusing on the nursing care delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

65 nurses' coordinators were involved to map the nursing models adopted in the healthcare organizations of in an Italian region, Tuscany. This dataset was merged with patient experience measures reported by 9,393 individuals discharged by the same organizations and collected through a Patient-Reported Experience Measures Observatory. The authors run a series of logistic regression models to test the relationships among variables.

Findings

Patients appreciate those characteristics of care delivery related to a specific professional nurse. Having someone who is in charge of the patient, both the reference nurse and the supervisor, makes a real difference. Purely organizational features, for instance those referring to the team working, do not significantly predict an excellent experience with healthcare services.

Research limitations/implications

Different features referring to different nursing models make the difference in producing an excellent user experience with the service.

Practical implications

These findings can support managers and practitioners in taking decisions on the service delivery models to adopt. Instead of applying monolithic pure models, mixing features of different models into a hybrid one seems more effective in meeting users' expectations.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies on the relationship between provision models of high-contact and relational-intensive services (the healthcare services) and users' experience. This research contributes to the literature on healthcare service management suggesting to acknowledge the importance of hybridization of features from different, purely theoretical service delivery models, in order to fit with providers' practice and users' expectations.

Highlights

  • This is one of the first studies on the relationship between provision models of nursing care and patient experience.

  • Healthcare services' users appreciate service delivery characteristics identified with “be cared by,” or in other words with having a reference nurse.

  • Nursing models' features that relate to the organizations and that providers tend to judge as professionalizing and evolutive, such as team working, appear not key in relation to patient experience.

  • Pure models of service delivery are theoretically useful, but hybrid models can better meet users' expectations.

This is one of the first studies on the relationship between provision models of nursing care and patient experience.

Healthcare services' users appreciate service delivery characteristics identified with “be cared by,” or in other words with having a reference nurse.

Nursing models' features that relate to the organizations and that providers tend to judge as professionalizing and evolutive, such as team working, appear not key in relation to patient experience.

Pure models of service delivery are theoretically useful, but hybrid models can better meet users' expectations.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Nick Zonneveld, Carina Pittens and Mirella Minkman

The purpose of this paper is to synthesize the existing evidence on leadership that best matches nursing home care, with a focus on behaviors, effects and influencing factors.

3289

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to synthesize the existing evidence on leadership that best matches nursing home care, with a focus on behaviors, effects and influencing factors.

Design/methodology/approach

A narrative review was performed in three steps: the establishment of scope, systematic search in five databases and assessment and analysis of the literature identified.

Findings

A total of 44 articles were included in the review. The results of the study imply that a stronger focus on leadership behaviors related to the specific context rather than leadership styles could be of added value in nursing home care.

Research limitations/implications

Only articles applicable to nursing home care were included. The definition of “nursing home care” may differ between countries. This study only focused on the academic literature. Future research should focus on strategies and methods for the translation of leadership into behavior in practice.

Practical implications

A broader and more conceptual perspective on leadership in nursing homes – in which leadership is seen as an attribute of all employees and enacted in multiple layers of the organization – could support leadership practice.

Originality/value

Leadership is considered an important element in the delivery of good quality nursing home care. This study provides insight into leadership behaviors and influencing contextual factors specifically in nursing homes.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Christine Smith

This paper presents a research study that demonstrates the inadequacy of the traditional biomedical approach to caring for older people and shows the benefits of using a…

Abstract

This paper presents a research study that demonstrates the inadequacy of the traditional biomedical approach to caring for older people and shows the benefits of using a more holistic, bio‐psychosocial approach. An ethnographic inductive approach was taken. Non‐participant observation was performed on complete episodes of nursing practice, followed by semi‐structured interviews to explore and ratify theories in use. Phase one of the data analysis used qualitative inductive analysis to generate main categories and themes. Phase two was a process of factor isolation, which identified factors of practice theories in use. The themes identified were: nursing therapeutics; preventative nursing; communication; nurse‐patient relationships; collaborative nursing; nursing assessment; decision making; and management of patient care. Further analysis identified that important theoretical factors included: encouraging; responding; comforting; explaining; maintaining ability; judgement in action; and collaborating. This knowledge is embedded in the practice theories of practitioners but it is only by exploring and critiquing these that we can hope to understand the complex nature of nursing practice as it relates to the care of older people.

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Linda Garvican and Graham Bickler

In view of the decline in the number of residential and nursing homes over the last few years, East Sussex, Brighton and Hove Health Authority was concerned about optimum…

Abstract

In view of the decline in the number of residential and nursing homes over the last few years, East Sussex, Brighton and Hove Health Authority was concerned about optimum usage of places. This project aimed to ascertain the views of home owners and managers on their working relationship with the health authority, local hospitals and social services.Respondents felt that the incoming residents were generally frailer and more dependent than a few years ago, funding allocations were inadequate, given the standards now expected of care homes, and there were delays of up to a year in reaching agreement. Several indicated that they would no longer take publicly funded clients unless the families could top up the payments. Ten percent of the private residential homes surveyed were for sale or due to close. Between 40 and 50 older people were estimated to be awaiting transfer to EMI or nursing homes in East Sussex. Over 35% of homes complained about inappropriate discharges of their residents from hospital, and a poor standard of nursing care. Communication with hospitals was poor and relationships with the health authority and social services needed strengthening. Routine admissions were appropriate, but hospital discharges may have been premature. Home owners/managers were dissatisfied with their relationship with the NHS. Improvements are needed if partnership working is to be developed.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Carina Furåker and Nilsson Agneta

The aim of this paper is to describe registered nurses' (RNs') ways of working and their views on what competence they require, make use of and wish to develop when caring

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to describe registered nurses' (RNs') ways of working and their views on what competence they require, make use of and wish to develop when caring for older people at residential facilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants comprised 23 RNs, trained after 1993 and working at seven residential facilities. The data collection consists of group interviews during spring 2009. The group interviews were subjected to content analysis.

Findings

Three main categories and six sub‐categories were identified. The findings show that the majority of RNs work in a consultative way although they are responsible for basic care as well as advanced nursing care. They must rely on the staff's competence. They compare the residential facilities to a “mini‐hospital” and they are often frustrated by the staff's incompetence. Attitudes to research findings and to the use of evidence‐based knowledge were limited.

Research limitations/implications

RNs require extensive theoretical, technical and medical knowledge as well as knowledge related to persons with dementia conditions and psychiatric disorders and how to lead, teach and supervise.

Practical implications

Social and professional isolation influences competence development and working situation and the differences in leadership influence the quality of nursing care. RNs do not critically reflect on what knowledge they require and make use of and how to search for scientific knowledge and this will have a negative influence on the attitude to the competence.

Originality/value

There is a need of extensive and varied knowledge in evidence‐based nursing as well as in leadership and teaching to be able to work independently.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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