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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Bente Flygansvær, Asta Gjetø Samuelsen and Rebecka Våge Støyle

Research shows a recycling behavior gap where end consumers are positive towards recycling but do not act in accordance with their intentions. Such a gap creates…

Abstract

Purpose

Research shows a recycling behavior gap where end consumers are positive towards recycling but do not act in accordance with their intentions. Such a gap creates challenges for reverse logistics systems. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how adaptations in reverse logistics systems towards end consumers-turned-suppliers can improve recycling behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework with three propositions is developed and evaluated empirically using a two-group dependent post-test quasi-experimental design. The empirical setting is recycling of household waste. Three interventions are evaluated as: (1) the social norms nudge, (2) the distance nudge and (3) the availability nudge.

Findings

The results show that nudging improved recycling action behavior for the experimental group. Control group behavior remained constant.

Research limitations/implications

This paper suggests that the end-consumer’s role as suppliers needs to be included more actively into reverse logistics systems for products to enter the preferred loops of recycling in the circular economy.

Originality/value

A new field of climate psychology is used to explain challenges in reverse logistics systems and nudging is demonstrated as a tool with which to deal with them. The study also shows how quasi-experiments can be applied in logistics research.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Shouwang Lu, Gong (Gordon) Chen and Kanliang Wang

This study aims to explore the effect of two digital nudging technologies that is overt digital nudging (ODN) and covert digital nudging (CDN), on consumers’ choices of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the effect of two digital nudging technologies that is overt digital nudging (ODN) and covert digital nudging (CDN), on consumers’ choices of nudged options in the context of online customization systems (OCS).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper designed a 2 (ODN: yes/no) by 2 (CDN: yes/no) full factor between-subject lab experiment in the context of online travel package customization. This paper collected and analyzed the number of nudged options (the intermediate options) of choices among consumers in these four scenarios.

Findings

ODN and CDN have positive effects on consumers’ choices of nudged options in online customization (OC). In addition, mixed nudge (a combination of ODN and CDN) has a more significant effect on consumers’ choices of nudged options in OC than using CDN only.

Research limitations/implications

This study focused only on the choice behavior of consumers in the customization context and did not analyze their attitude change. The present study used vendor recommendation as the proxy variable of ODN and default option as the proxy variable of CDN. A future study could explore other instances of ODN and CDN.

Practical implications

This study explores the effects of digital nudging technologies in the context of OCS. The study provides clear guidance for customization vendors on whether to use digital nudging tools and their combinations, and which tools should be preferred.

Social implications

Vendors can adopt digital nudging technology to persuade consumers to choose nudged options. This nudging effect can make consumers’ choices predictable and less uncertain, thus adding profits for vendors.

Originality/value

First, the study focuses on the impact of digital nudging on consumers’ choices and enriches the understanding of the impact of customization system design on consumers’ choices. Second, this paper put forward a new classification method for digital nudging and proposed, respectively, the effect mechanisms on consumers’ customization choices. Third, this study explores the effect of combining multiple nudging tools in OC context on consumers’ choices, which deepens the understanding of the interactive effects of different types of nudging tools.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

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Article
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Sandra Bammert, Ulrich Matthias König, Maximilian Roeglinger and Tabitha Wruck

Business process improvement is vital for organizations as business environments are becoming ever more volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. Process improvement…

Abstract

Purpose

Business process improvement is vital for organizations as business environments are becoming ever more volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. Process improvement methods help organizations sustain competitiveness. Many existing methods, however, do not fit emerging business environments as they entail initiatives with long implementation times, high investments and limited involvement of process participants. What is needed are agile process improvement approaches. The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential of digital nudging – a concept offering tools that lead individuals to better decisions – to improve business processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Using process deviance as theoretical lens, an online experiment with 473 participants is conducted. Within the experiment, business processes and digital nudges are implemented to examine whether digital nudging can mitigate the weaknesses of existing process improvement methods.

Findings

Digital nudging can influence the decisions of process participants and entail positive process deviance that leads to process improvement opportunities. Further, the research gives a first hint on the effectiveness of different digital nudges and lays the foundation for future research.

Research limitations/implications

Since exploring a completely new field of research and conducting the experiment in a synthetic environment, the paper serves as a first step toward the combination of digital nudging, business process improvements and positive process deviance.

Originality/value

The major achievement reported in this paper is the exploration of a new field of research. Thus, digital nudging shapes up as a promising foundation for agile process improvement, a discovery calling for future research at the intersection of digital nudging and business process management.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Ingrid Laukeland Djupegot

Perceived effectiveness of nudging has been established as one of the most reliable predictors of acceptance of nudging. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how…

Abstract

Purpose

Perceived effectiveness of nudging has been established as one of the most reliable predictors of acceptance of nudging. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how source credibility and argument strength influence the perceived effectiveness of textual information about food-related nudging in order to provide a better understanding of how acceptance of nudging may be facilitated.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 × 2 scenario-based between-subjects factorial experiment with source credibility (high vs low) and argument strength (high vs low) as factors was applied. Data on respondents’ level of involvement in food-related behaviour were also collected.

Findings

Argument strength had a positive main effect on the perceived effectiveness of nudging, and there was a significant positive interaction effect of source credibility × argument strength on the perceived effectiveness of nudging.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper provide policy makers and other decision makers with a better understanding of how information about nudging should be communicated to consumers in order to facilitate acceptance.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to investigate how information about nudging should be communicated to consumers in order for nudging to be perceived as an effective and thus acceptable measure to influence food-related behaviour.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Gary Spraakman, Winnie O’Grady, Davood Askarany and Chris Akroyd

This paper aims to show how our understanding of the effects of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems on management accounting are influenced through “nudging” by…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show how our understanding of the effects of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems on management accounting are influenced through “nudging” by researchers in their preamble before interviews begin.

Design/methodology/approach

There were two groups of comparable respondents. Each group received a different preamble to the same questions. The differences in group responses were analyzed.

Findings

When the impact of ERP implementation on the physical, transactional and information flows within the firm were nudged, the responses focused on how the chart of accounts had to be expanded to account for the additional data introduced by transaction processing. When the IT and ERP system knowledge and skills were nudged, the responses tended to emphasize analyses or the use of new information through the use of drill down functionality. This research provides new insights and contributions to understanding how nudging affects or directs respondent assessments of the impact of ERP systems on management accounting.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited by the relatively small samples and by the fact that these were different research projects.

Practical implications

Nudging has an obvious impact on research that should not be ignored.

Social implications

Unintentional nudging should be considered with all research projects.

Originality/value

This paper makes explicit that nudging occurs in research whether intentional or unintentional.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2015

Sylvia D. Hall-Ellis

Evaluating a situation and circumstance to make a decision is an essential managerial skill. Experienced managers can use nudging to influence decisions that subordinate…

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1521

Abstract

Purpose

Evaluating a situation and circumstance to make a decision is an essential managerial skill. Experienced managers can use nudging to influence decisions that subordinate and embed the practice within the institution as a learning organization. Adopting a nudge theory perspective changes the workplace environment, so that individuals make decisions that are helpful to themselves for job satisfaction and professional growth as well as positive for the organization. Research suggests that nudging has positive results that contribute to increased productivity, higher morale and decreased expenses.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an opinion piece.

Findings

This is an opinion piece.

Research limitations/implications

This is not a research article.

Practical implications

Administrators can use the recommendations in this column.

Social implications

Administrators can use the recommendations in this column.

Originality/value

This is an original viewpoint.

Details

The Bottom Line: Managing library finances, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2019

Iris Van der Meiden, Herman Kok and Gerben Van der Velde

This paper aims to investigate whether and why nudging interventions in an office environment are effective to stimulate stair use of employees.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether and why nudging interventions in an office environment are effective to stimulate stair use of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a pre-test/post-test case study design at the headquarters of a Dutch online retailer. Observations were conducted to test the impact of two nudge interventions, being footprints and posters, on employees’ stair use in two consecutive pre-test/post-test weeks. An online survey questionnaire was used to assess employees’ overall experience with the nudging interventions after the fifth and again neutral week.

Findings

A total of 14,357 observations were recorded during five weeks. This research shows that footprints as nudging intervention significantly increase stair use of employees, and after removal, significantly decrease stair use again. Moreover, footprints were more effective than posters, of which the latter did not impact stair use significantly. Results from the survey questionnaire, completed by 46.2 per cent of the employees, showed that, in terms of degree of perception, footprints (91.4 per cent) were more noticeable than posters (46.3 per cent).

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the non-conclusive research regarding the effectiveness of nudging interventions on stair use in office environments. It clearly shows that perceptibility in combination with a positive attitude towards the nudge leads to a higher degree of initial behavioural change, yet not to a change of mind.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2021

Hiroko Oe and Yasuyuki Yamaoka

This study aims to present a communication model for promoting value co-creation between citizens and policymakers and to draw out proposals on the rationale in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present a communication model for promoting value co-creation between citizens and policymakers and to draw out proposals on the rationale in implementing nudge effect as well as key policy implications. The paper also revisits the close relationship between information senders and receivers (citizens) from the perspective of “citizen behaviour change” and focuses on the nudge effect, which strengthens the communication skills of policymakers (information senders) and accelerates the behaviour change of citizens (i.e. the recipients of information). Based on the study, the authors propose a conceptual framework to explain the spontaneous incentive structure of citizens.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a conceptual discussion based on a literature review. It examines the nudge effect on citizen behaviour based on information and communications models and theories. From critical discussions of literature, it proposes an analytical model that focuses on the nudge effect put forward in behavioural economics and takes into account the importance of measures to increase the sensitivity and empathy of the recipients of information.

Findings

The authors revisited the relationship between information senders and receivers from the perspective of citizen behavioural change and focus on the nudge effect, which strengthens the communication power of policymakers and accelerates the behavioural change of citizens (i.e. the recipients of information). According to the study, the authors propose a conceptual framework to explain citizens' spontaneous incentive structure. The dual perspective of policymakers and citizens should be central to the collaboration between citizens and policymakers to enhance the effectiveness of social policies, where the scope and type of value generated and the perspective of social value are essential.

Research limitations/implications

This paper bridges the interdisciplinary research fields of behavioural economics and social policy. It is hoped that the model proposed in this paper will be an effective discussion framework for relevant researchers and practitioners when considering human resource training and system building related to information dissemination. In addition, it is hoped the model will be an effective tool for deepening discussions on topics that help to facilitate information transfer and communication within organisations.

Practical implications

The realisation of policy intentions within the core elements of the social policy process, such as the definition of key objectives, policy mechanisms and legislation, are central elements of policy formation and are said to be highly similar across countries. The framework proposed in this study is a valid resource that can be applied in other countries and can be expected to act an effective guidepost for policy makers and other stakeholders engaged in social policy.

Originality/value

Up to this point, in examinations of encouraging behavioural change in information recipients, attention has been focussed on the aspect of increasing the sender's ability to transmit information. Interventions, such as increasing the energy of the delivery, increasing the frequency and diversifying the media to make a strong impression on the receiver's consciousness, have been considered and implemented. However, this study suggests that, in addition to such efforts on the part of the sender, it is important to increase the sensitivity and affinity of the receiver to the message as preliminary preparation to receiving it.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 May 2017

Philip DeCicca, Donald Kenkel, Feng Liu and Hua Wang

The U.S. 2009 Tobacco Control Act opened the door for new antismoking policies by giving the Food and Drug Administration broad regulatory authority over the tobacco…

Abstract

The U.S. 2009 Tobacco Control Act opened the door for new antismoking policies by giving the Food and Drug Administration broad regulatory authority over the tobacco industry. We develop a behavioral welfare economics approach to conduct cost-benefit analysis of FDA tobacco regulations. We use a simple two-period model to develop expressions for the impact of tobacco control policies on social welfare. Our model includes: nudge and paternalistic regulations; an excise tax on cigarettes; internalities created by period 1 versus period 2 consumption; and externalities from cigarette consumption. Our analytical expressions show that in the presence of uncorrected internalities and externalities, a nudge or a tax to reduce cigarette consumption improves social welfare. In sharp contrast, a paternalistic regulation might either improve or worsen social welfare. Another important result is that the social welfare gains from new policies do not only depend on the size of the internalities and externalities, but also depend on the extent to which current policies already correct the problems. We link our analytical expressions to the graphical approach used in most previous studies and discuss the information needed to complete cost-benefit analysis of tobacco regulations. We use our model as a framework to reexamine the evidence base for strong conclusions about the size of the internalities, which is the key information needed.

Details

Human Capital and Health Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-466-2

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Helle Neergaard, Sarah Robinson and Sally Jones

This paper introduces “pedagogical nudging” as a method, which can transform student dispositions and their perceived “fit” with the field of entrepreneurship. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper introduces “pedagogical nudging” as a method, which can transform student dispositions and their perceived “fit” with the field of entrepreneurship. The authors investigate what characterises the identity change process experienced by students when exposed to pedagogical nudging.

Design/methodology/approach

Using ethnography, the authors apply an experiential-explorative approach to collecting data. The authors collected 1,015 individual reflection logs from 145 students of which the authors sampled 290 for this paper combined with interviews, observational and documentary data.

Findings

Pedagogical nudging techniques help (1) expose and challenge the student habitus by planting footprints in the mind; (2) straddle the divide between student and nascent entrepreneur by enabling them to recognise and experiment with an entrepreneurial habitus and (3) figuratively learn to climb the entrepreneurial tree by embracing an entrepreneurial habitus. In the first step, the authors use the interventions as cognitive means of influencing (pedagogical nudging). In the second, students participate in an iterative meaning-making process through reflection. In the third, they internalise the “new” entrepreneurial habitus—or discard it.

Research limitations/implications

The authors extend existing knowledge about the effect of particular kinds of pedagogies in entrepreneurship teaching, and how these can support enterprising behaviour. The authors demonstrate how an exploration of the inner self, identity and beliefs develops the capacity for students to re-shape future outcomes and create value.

Practical implications

By using nudging pedagogies, educators can support students to develop new ways of acknowledging and coping with transformative learning.

Originality/value

The research documents how it is possible to 'nudge' our students towards more entrepreneurial behaviours.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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