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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2013

Elżbieta Sawa-Czajka

Depending on the adopted principles of their domestic energy policy, individual countries responded in different ways to the information coming in from Japan. The majority…

Abstract

Depending on the adopted principles of their domestic energy policy, individual countries responded in different ways to the information coming in from Japan. The majority of European countries having atomic power stations recommended inspection of the installations, particularly of those of older types. Discussion concerning the safety of nuclear installations also flared up. Opponents of the atomic power industry and environmentalists, asexpected, pointed to a need to lean energy production toward so-called renewable energy sources. This chapter explores public debate on the planned construction of nuclear power station in Poland in the aftermath of the Chernobyl and Japanese nuclear reactor explosions.

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Voices of Globalization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-546-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Pamela M. Barnes

The national governments of the European Union (EU) are finding it increasingly difficult to provide their populations with cheap and reliable sources of electricity…

Abstract

Purpose

The national governments of the European Union (EU) are finding it increasingly difficult to provide their populations with cheap and reliable sources of electricity. There is a highly controversial technology available within the EU which could overcome this problem – nuclear generated electricity. The purpose of this article is to question the extent to which it is possible to reconcile the views of those citizens who object to the use of nuclear electricity with views of those who support the use of nuclear electricity as a competitive, sustainable and secure electricity supply within an open and competitive European energy market.

Design/methodology/approach

This article adopts an inter‐disciplinary approach to the analysis of the issues.

Findings

Political, economic and environmental pressures are combining to constrain the opportunities for national governments to enable citizens’ preferences with regard to the nuclear sector to be maintained. What is argued in the article is that all the tools which are available to the EU to overcome any lack of democratic decision making in the nuclear sector must be utilised to their full potential, including the legal framework provided by the often overlooked EURATOM Treaty.

Originality/value

The research will be of value to academic lawyers and political scientists investigating the problematic relationships which exist between the national and supranational levels of governance in the EU.

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Managerial Law, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2013

Huang Chaofeng

China's defense industry is analyzed by comparing the technical level of the military and civilian products manufactured by China's nuclear, space, aviation, shipbuilding…

Abstract

China's defense industry is analyzed by comparing the technical level of the military and civilian products manufactured by China's nuclear, space, aviation, shipbuilding, ordnance, and electronics industries with their advanced counterparts. Generally, China's defense industry is about 20 years behind the global leaders. Thus, it is inappropriate to declare China's emergence as the world’s second military power. However, if it continues on its current development trajectory, it will attain that status in the near future.

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Cooperation for a Peaceful and Sustainable World Part 2
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-655-2

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Javier Cantero, Natalia Lorena Gonzalez and Daiana Diaz

The design, construction, and operation of a nuclear power plant (NPP) pose technological and R&D challenges for the organisations concerned. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

The design, construction, and operation of a nuclear power plant (NPP) pose technological and R&D challenges for the organisations concerned. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the sources of innovation and the technological developments throughout the construction and commissioning processes for Atucha II NPP.

Design/methodology/approach

Studying a high-risk organisation that is reliable in practice poses several research questions the authors consider in this work. What kind of R&D processes can take place in a mature industry like the nuclear sector in Argentina? How have technological challenges been overcome since the restart of the completion phase of Atucha II NPP? Primary data were mostly gathered through semi-structured interviews. Grounded theory was the methodological approach adopted.

Findings

Multiple sources of technological developments arise, an incremental R&D pattern being the most salient. Atucha II NPP seems to be a case of network innovation in a triple helix innovation scheme led by the Argentinian state. In effect, one of the outcomes of the construction of the Atucha II NPP was the development of the Argentinian nuclear sector together with the development of organisational capabilities. In this sense, the third Argentine NPP follows the socio-technical path of the Argentine nuclear industry.

Originality/value

Too little is known about R&D processes in high reliability organisations (HROs), especially in the nuclear sector of a Latin American country such as Argentina as there seem to be no organisational studies analysing HROs’ impact on innovation, reliability, and economic development.

Propósito

Diseñar, construir y operar una central nucleoeléctrica plantea desafíos tecnológicos y de innovación a las organizaciones involucradas. Este artículo analiza las fuentes de innovación y los desarrollos tecnológicos del proceso de construcción y puesta en marcha de la central nucleoeléctrica Atucha II.

Diseño/Metodología/Enfoque

Abordar el estudio de una organización concebida desde la teoría como altamente riesgosa pero confiable en la práctica plantea múltiples interrogantes. ¿Qué tipo de procesos de I+D se pueden dar en una industria madura como la nuclear civil, en Argentina? ¿Cómo se afrontaron los desafíos tecnológicos a partir de la reactivación de un proyecto abandonado durante más de una década? La entrevista semi-estructurada a interlocutores clave fue el instrumento de intervención predominantemente utilizado. Se adoptó el enfoque metodológico de la teoría fundada.

Hallazgos

Del análisis del caso surgen diversas fuentes de desarrollos tecnológicos prevaleciendo un patrón de I+D incremental. Se trata de un caso de innovación en red en el marco de un modelo de triple hélice liderado por el Estado. En efecto, una de las resultantes de la construcción de Atucha II es el desarrollo del entramado del sector nuclear argentino junto con el desarrollo de capacidades organizacionales. En ese sentido, la tercera central nuclear de potencia argentina retoma la trayectoria socio-técnica del sector nuclear argentino.

Originalidad/Valor

Resultan escasos los conocimientos sobre los procesos de I+D en organizaciones de alta confiabilidad (HROs), especialmente del sector nuclear de un país latinoamericano como Argentina así como se carece de estudios organizacionales que analicen el impacto de las HROs en la innovación, la confiabilidad y el desarrollo económico.

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Annika Beelitz and Doris M. Merkl-Davies

The purpose of this paper is to examine a case of companies cooperating with the State to prevent a public controversy over nuclear power following the Fukushima disaster…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine a case of companies cooperating with the State to prevent a public controversy over nuclear power following the Fukushima disaster and achieve mutually beneficial policy outcomes. It analyses the private and public communication of pro-nuclear corporate, political and regulatory actors.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the political economy theory, the study examines how actors mobilised power by accessing an existing social network to agree a joint public communication strategy in order to ensure public support for the continuation of nuclear power generation in the UK. It traces discursive frames from their inception in private communication to their reproduction in public communication and their dissemination via the media.

Findings

The study provides evidence of pro-nuclear actors cooperating behind the scenes to achieve consistent public pro-nuclear messaging. It finds evidence of four discursive frames: avoiding knee-jerk reactions, lessons learned, safety and nuclear renaissance. In combination, they guide audiences’ evaluation of the consequences of the Fukushima disaster for the UK in favour of continuing the commercial use of nuclear energy.

Originality/value

The private e-mail exchange between pro-nuclear actors presents a unique opportunity to examine the mobilisation of less visible forms of power in the form of agenda setting (manipulation) and discursive framing (domination) in order to influence policy outcomes and shape public opinion on nuclear energy. This is problematic because it constitutes a lack of transparency and accountability on part of the State with respect to policy outcomes and restricts the civic space by curtailing the articulation of alternative interests and voices.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Liisa Sallinen, Inkeri Ruuska and Tuomas Ahola

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding on stakeholder influence in large projects, using nuclear power plant projects and a governmental stakeholder that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding on stakeholder influence in large projects, using nuclear power plant projects and a governmental stakeholder that influences them as the empirical example. The authors focus on examining the means used by the stakeholder to influence the projects.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts the descriptive single case study approach, using data from 18 semi‐structured interviews. The authors interviewed experts at a governmental stakeholder organization, but in order to gain insight from outside the governmental stakeholder, they also interviewed two other organizations: an energy company, and the highest administrative ministry in the nuclear industry.

Findings

The governmental stakeholder bases its influence on regulations and laws. This paper points out the distinct means that are used by the governmental stakeholder to influence nuclear projects: means that restrain, and also means that enable and advance projects. Both types of means are used at the same time. Enabling means include, among others, allowing projects and firms to contribute to the very same regulations that control the projects.

Originality/value

Much of the earlier research emphasizes government influence as negative to projects, but this paper shows an example of a stakeholder whose influence also includes aspects that are beneficial for projects. The governmental stakeholder can also be understood as a stakeholder that combines two stakes: its own legal stake, and society's moral stake. In carrying society's stake in projects, the governmental stakeholder acts as an intermediary.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Robert Bogue

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the uses of robots in the nuclear power industry, with an emphasis on newer developments and applications.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the uses of robots in the nuclear power industry, with an emphasis on newer developments and applications.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an introduction to the nuclear industry, this paper considers robotic applications in two areas: test and inspection and decommissioning. A range of products, applications and case histories are discussed.

Findings

It is shown that robots are used widely for test and inspection and decommissioning tasks. The majority are highly specialised and are frequently produced by specialist nuclear engineering companies. The main robotic test and inspection techniques are visual inspection, ultrasonics and eddy current and the use of robots reflects both the need to minimise operator exposure to radiation and the frequent difficulties in accessing critical components such as pressure vessel welds and steam generator tubes. Key decommissioning uses include handling and size reduction of contaminated materials, cutting and demolition.

Originality/value

This paper provides details of inspection and decommissioning robots in the nuclear power industry.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Extending nuclear plants' lifespans is a relatively low-cost way of sustaining this form of power generation, but renewable energy with zero fuel costs is challenging such…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB261253

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2017

The 2016 announcement of plans for a large new UK nuclear plant at Hinkley Point, just 250 miles from Ireland’s coast, was met with concern by many Irish people…

Abstract

The 2016 announcement of plans for a large new UK nuclear plant at Hinkley Point, just 250 miles from Ireland’s coast, was met with concern by many Irish people. Paradoxically, nuclear power was rejected in Ireland in 1979 with the development of the coal burning plant at Moneypoint in County Clare, and outlawed as an energy option in 1999, yet the country still utilises electricity from the UK’s power grid, which includes energy derived from nuclear power. Ireland’s interconnected energy grid includes Northern Ireland and the Republic. This chapter will examine the issues surrounding Ireland’s energy policy. In particular, it will focus on the debates that have occurred in Ireland in relation to the use of nuclear energy.

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The Sustainable Nation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-379-3

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Mary A. Ferdig and James D. Ludema

Complexity theorists propose that organizations are made up of complex responsive processes in which people create and recreate organizational forms through dynamic…

Abstract

Complexity theorists propose that organizations are made up of complex responsive processes in which people create and recreate organizational forms through dynamic micro-level interactions. Social constructionists add that conversations are the means by which these interactions occur. Our analysis illustrates how the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) engaged a wide range of stakeholders in a successful dialogue process to recreate a new system for monitoring nuclear reactors. The success was due, in large part, to the conversational qualities tacitly and explicitly agreed to by those involved in the process which included a spirit of freedom, inclusion, inquiry, spontaneity, and possibility. Using a grounded theory building process, we show how these qualities produced transformative change by increasing levels of interconnectivity, shared identity, and collective capacity among participants. These findings provide the beginnings of a model for understanding continuous and transformative change and demonstrate the value of engaging the “whole system” in sustained dialogue, even in complex, highly regulated environments.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-167-5

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