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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Antónia Correia, Adriano Pimpão and Geoffrey Crouch

Risk is a major concern among tourists and the objective of this chapter is to investigate how different factors contribute to the overall perceived risk and how novelty

Abstract

Risk is a major concern among tourists and the objective of this chapter is to investigate how different factors contribute to the overall perceived risk and how novelty motivations moderate this risk. The sample population of the study consists of 4,057 international tourists on low-cost travel visiting the Algarve, Portugal in 2005 and 2006. The research findings show that the sensibility towards the occurrence of any type of risk vary with the tourist's age, familiarity with the destination, and travel experience as well as their propensity to seek novelty. Furthermore, it finds that younger tourists are more apt to be novelty seekers and, simultaneously, less sensitive to risk, than older tourists are. Familiarity with the destination derives from previous visits, diminishes the sensibility to the risk, and increases the degree of novelty-seeking. This chapter discusses specific managerial and theoretical implications.

Details

Advances in Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-522-2

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2020

Savaş Evren, Emine Şimşek Evren and A. Celil Çakıcı

The purpose of this study is to determine the optimum stimulation levels (OSLs) of cultural tourists within the context of their novelty seeking tendencies and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the optimum stimulation levels (OSLs) of cultural tourists within the context of their novelty seeking tendencies and to determine whether their OSLs have a moderating effect on the relationship between their satisfaction and revisit intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

To collect data, an online survey was conducted for Turkish cultural tourists (n = 563) in May 2018, and the data were analysed with PROCESS by Hayes.

Findings

The study’s findings demonstrated that Turkish cultural tourists were high-level novelty seekers and that novelty seeking has a moderating effect on the relationship between their satisfaction and short-term revisit intentions.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by revealing the moderator effect of novelty seeking tendency on the relationship between satisfaction and revisit intention within the scope of cultural tourism, which has not been examined before.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Sergey Yagolkovskiy

This paper aims to investigate relationships among correlates of individual innovative activity: creativity, innovativeness, novelty seeking and intelligence.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate relationships among correlates of individual innovative activity: creativity, innovativeness, novelty seeking and intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 202 students of the Higher School of Economics (123 females and 79 males).

Findings

The findings revealed significant relations between intelligence and fluency of participants’ creative performances, as well as novelty seeking and innovativeness.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the correlation design, the sample of students and the self-reported measures for novelty seeking and innovativeness.

Practical implications

The paper proposes a number of implications for researchers and practitioners who deal with innovation. The results of the study can be applied to various procedures and stages of innovation management.

Originality/value

The study contributes to knowledge on psychological correlates of innovation on an individual level, such as creativity, innovativeness, novelty seeking and intelligence, as well as produces an empirically validated model of the relationships among them.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Andrea Pérez and Ignacio Rodríguez del Bosque

The purpose of this paper is to first, propose a causal model to understand the process of corporate social responsibility (CSR) perception formation among customers; and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to first, propose a causal model to understand the process of corporate social responsibility (CSR) perception formation among customers; and second, identify differences among innovative and conservative customers in that process.

Design/methodology/approach

A structural equation model is tested in a sample of 1,124 banking services customers in Spain. Also, a multisampling analysis is implemented in order to determine how novelty seeking moderates the process of CSR perception formation among customers.

Findings

Results confirm that customer CSR perceptions are directly and positively influenced by: the congruence between CSR initiatives and corporate profile; customer attributions of corporate motivations to engage in CSR; and corporate credibility in developing CSR initiatives. Nonetheless, while innovative customers pay greater attention to corporate credibility than conservative customers when evaluating CSR initiatives, conservative customers evaluate the congruence of CSR initiatives and their attribution of altruistic motivations to a larger extent than innovative customers.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that companies should take into account customer novelty seeking when planning their CSR and communication strategies because highlighting different qualities of their CSR initiatives can have diverse effects for the success of corporate investments.

Originality/value

The greatest contribution of the paper is the study of the moderating role of novelty seeking in the process of customer CSR perception formation; previous scholars had long ignored this variable when evaluating customer perceptions.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2021

Xuan Quach and Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee

The aim of this study is to profile types of gifters via a set of psychographic consumption traits (frugality, gratitude, market mavenism and novelty seeking) and identify…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to profile types of gifters via a set of psychographic consumption traits (frugality, gratitude, market mavenism and novelty seeking) and identify differences among the groups regarding their gift-purchasing behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the data from 193 participants, the authors seek to identify and profile unique consumer segments (gifters) generated from the four psychographic consumption traits. Second, once the segments are established, the authors analyze how the segments differ across 16 unique gift-purchasing behaviors.

Findings

The data generated four distinct consumer segments: experiential gifters, considerate gifters, convenience gifters and astute gifters. Across the segments, there were differences in their gift consumption behavior (e.g. time/effort spent, desire for customization, gift presentation, derived joy, purchasing frequency, eco-friendliness, seeking assistance, regifting and more).

Research limitations/implications

US-based sample was collected via an online panel in January; this may restrict the generalizability of the research, given that gift consumption customs may vary across different countries. Thus, future research should include participants from other geographic regions to increase the external validity of the research.

Practical implications

Retail managers can use this knowledge to devise marketing strategies focused on the gift-purchasing behaviors of each group.

Originality/value

Segmenting clusters based on differences in consumption traits provides insights to retailers looking to build a competitive advantage, particularly in a gift purchasing context.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Faten Alshammari and Youn-Kyung Kim

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether visitors’ seeking and escaping motivations influence the cognitive evaluation of a non-traditional festival in Saudi…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether visitors’ seeking and escaping motivations influence the cognitive evaluation of a non-traditional festival in Saudi Arabia, which in turn leads to the sense of joy and subsequent word-of-mouth publicity. In Saudi Arabia, leisure and tourism opportunities are limited and many Saudis have a strong desire for new leisure experiences. Although the government and event organizers have made efforts to provide visitors with unconventional experiences at non-tradition-based festivals, these festivals have not attracted many Saudi Arabian visitors.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative methodology was used based on the on-site data collected from 458 visitors attending the Abha summer festival in Saudi Arabia. A structural equation modeling was used to test the relationships among seeking motivations, escaping motivations, cognitive evaluation, sense of joy and word-of-mouth.

Findings

The result reveals that two seeking motivations (i.e. food and entertainment) and two escaping motivations (i.e. diversion and escape) influence cognitive evaluation, which in turn influences their sense of joy and ultimately word-of-mouth. However, novelty, a seeking motivation, does not influence cognitive evaluation.

Research limitations/implications

The authors limited the study of seeking and escaping motivations to one non-traditional festival in Saudi Arabia. Further studies can use multiple festivals to increase generalizability to non-traditional festivals in Saudi Arabia. Another extension of this study would be to examine these motivations in both traditional and non-traditional festivals in Saudi Arabia to assess to what extent visitors’ seeking and escaping motivations are fulfilled in each type of festival.

Practical implications

Diversion motivation is the most important factor for non-traditional festival organizers to consider in developing strategies to attract more visitors in Saudi Arabia.

Originality/value

This paper is the first that applies Iso-Ahola’s motivation theory and the cognitive appraisal theory of emotion in the non-traditional festival setting in Saudi Arabia.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Michael C. Brennan and Pauric McGowan

To explore, describe and explain what processes are at work in facilitating or inhibiting entrepreneurship amongst academics.

Abstract

Purpose

To explore, describe and explain what processes are at work in facilitating or inhibiting entrepreneurship amongst academics.

Design/methodology/approach

A corporate entrepreneurship perspective is used to construct a framework for understanding academic entrepreneurship at different ontological levels within a university context. A single case study method is adopted involving a purposeful sampling strategy of academic entrepreneurs within one university. A sense‐making approach investigated the practice of entrepreneurship by academics.

Findings

Develops a tentative framework for bounding the phenomenon of academic entrepreneurship and presents a model that attempts to identify key elements of academic entrepreneurship in terms of different modes of knowledge production and value‐creating processes.

Research limitations/implications

The single case setting limits the applicability of the research to other institutions. However, the framework and model that are developed and the overall approach are valuable contributions to an important, emerging research area. The academic entrepreneurship framework provides a series of logically related conceptual bins that form a basis for future research. The model of academic entrepreneurship attempts to explain how academics produce different types of knowledge.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that academic entrepreneurs have a complex set of relationships with their parent disciplines and the university setting within which they operate. The outcomes indicate that orthodox models of entrepreneurship are not always meaningful as regards understanding what academic entrepreneurs actually do in practice.

Originality/value

The paper investigates a little‐understood phenomenon and one that is increasingly important for UK policy makers and university administrators. The academic entrepreneurship framework and model is an original and valuable contribution to the study of this phenomenon.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2017

Johann Füller and Volker Bilgram

This study aims to draw a more nuanced picture of the impact of co-creation experience shedding light on the moderating role of consumers’ personal features. Virtual…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to draw a more nuanced picture of the impact of co-creation experience shedding light on the moderating role of consumers’ personal features. Virtual co-creation is considered a viable strategy to develop consumer-centered products in the digital era. As an additional effect, this research highlighted that co-creation experiences may establish beneficial consumer–brand relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data stemming from 727 consumers who virtually engaged in new product development projects, the authors test the hypotheses, applying structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results of this study show that consumers’ personal features such as novelty seeking and dissatisfaction with existing products moderate the impact of an enjoyable experience on aspects of the consumer–company relationship. Consumers’ dissatisfaction with current product solutions is also found to moderate the relationship between an enjoyable co-creation experience and evoked product interest as well as between product involvement and evoked product interest. The study further substantiates previous findings on the relationship-effects of co-creation and particularly highlight the potential of co-creation experiences for nurturing “imaginary” relationships with the product being co-created significantly prior to market launch.

Originality/value

Participants in virtual co-creation approaches are widely heterogeneous individuals ranging from customers and Facebook fans to brand community members and innovative users. The study contributes to a better understanding of how the diversity of the crowd can be handled in virtual co-creation and advances the theory of value co-creation as a new marketing paradigm.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Yucheng Zhang, Jing Li, Chih-Hsing Liu, Yimo Shen and Guiquan Li

Research on the relationship between novelty and travel intention is lacking. This study attempts to fill this gap by developing a theoretical model to explain how novelty

Abstract

Purpose

Research on the relationship between novelty and travel intention is lacking. This study attempts to fill this gap by developing a theoretical model to explain how novelty influences travel intention through two mediating paths: brand equity and tourist motivation.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, data were collected from 466 foreign visitors to Taiwanese night markets. To test the model, the authors applied structural equation modeling (SEM) to identify the critical attributes that predicted foreign tourists' travel intentions.

Findings

The SEM analysis indicated that novelty in tourism management was related to brand equity and intrinsic motivation, which increased foreign tourists' travel intentions and offered advantages for highly competitive, high-density night markets in Taiwan. In addition, brand equity was an important mediator that connected novelty and tourists' travel intentions. Finally, novelty indirectly affected travel intention and intrinsic motivation through brand equity.

Research limitations/implications

There may exist potential moderators in the relationships among the brand equity and travel intention categories. Future research studies could explore whether any moderators influence the relationship mechanisms examined in this study.

Originality/value

This research expands on previous research studies that have focused on the value of travel intention. Furthermore, the study uses brand equity theory (BET) and the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to examine the mediating effect of intrinsic motivation on the relationship between novelty and travel intention.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2014

Wei Wang

Research on consumer innovativeness has been studied in the field of marketing during the past decade, in that it has become critical to firms and businesses introducing…

Abstract

Research on consumer innovativeness has been studied in the field of marketing during the past decade, in that it has become critical to firms and businesses introducing new products. Yet as the literature concerning innovativeness in the hospitality sector is extremely limited, the purpose of this study is to better conceptualize and understand innovativeness in the hospitality sector (e.g., hotel, restaurant & bar, food & beverage, and occupational training). Using a qualitative method, personal interviews have been collected in this study from local hospitality managers and data are analyzed by constant comparative analysis. Eight themes emerge from the interview data: (1) novelty seeking, (2) eagerness, (3) vigilance, (4) openness, (5) venturesome, (6) hedonism, (7) value seeking, and (8) social distinctiveness. These intrinsic characteristics capture the concept of innovativeness in a broader range within different perspectives. The resultant data could therefore be utilized in future research to evaluate the level of awareness and use of perceived innovativeness in consumer behavior research and business marketing.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-174-9

Keywords

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