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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Shantala Samant, Pooja Thakur-Wernz and Donald E. Hatfield

The purpose of this paper is to study the differences in the internationalization process of firms from emerging economies and the impact of their international expansion…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the differences in the internationalization process of firms from emerging economies and the impact of their international expansion related choices on the nature of technological innovations developed by these firms. Specifically, the authors compare two principal perspectives on internationalization – the incremental internationalization process (slow, gradually increasing commitments using greenfield investments to similar host countries) and the springboard perspective (aggressive, rapidly increasing commitments using mergers and acquisitions to advanced host countries).

Design/methodology/approach

Building on key differences between the incremental internationalization and springboard perspectives, the authors argue that differences in the speed and mode of entry, as well as the interaction between the mode of entry and location of internationalization, will lead to differences in the types of technologies (mature versus novel) developed by emerging economy firms. The authors examine the hypotheses using panel data from 1997 to 2013 on emerging economy multinationals (EMNEs) from the Indian bio-pharmaceutical industry.

Findings

The findings suggest that firms internationalizing at higher speeds and using cross-border M&As tend to have innovations in mature technologies. The interesting findings can be explained by the challenges faced by emerging economy firms in experiential learning and the assimilation of external knowledge. In addition, the authors find that internationalization to technologically advanced countries weakens the relationship between cross-border M&As and innovation in mature technologies, suggesting that direct learning from technologically advanced environments may help alleviate the assimilation challenges of cross-border M&As.

Originality/value

The authors advance literature on EMNE internationalization by comparing the impact of their choice of internationalization approaches (incremental internationalization or springboard approach) on their innovation performance. The authors contribute to literature on EMNEs that has focused on the determinants of internationalization by identifying the learning implications of internationalization. The authors contribute to the nascent stream of literature on the level of innovation and catching up by EMNEs by performing a fine-grained analysis of the nature of technology innovation.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

G. Evans and D.N. Cox

The purpose of this paper is to identify antecedents of attitudes towards foods produced by novel technologies, including high pressure processing (HPP) (orange juice);…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify antecedents of attitudes towards foods produced by novel technologies, including high pressure processing (HPP) (orange juice); genetic modification for a “health benefit” (omega‐3 margarine); novel cereals with resistant starch for a “health benefit” where the traits were identified by genetic modification to understand selected gene function prior to utilising traditional breeding techniques to achieve desired novel traits (pasta); and infertility technologies (triploidy and irradiation) for farmed aquaculture (prawns).

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire based on adaptations of three validated food choice questionnaires was administered using an incomplete block design, with each respondent (n=142) assessing two products produced by three differing technologies (triads). Quantitative responses to food choice issues and the importance of those issues (belief evaluation constructs) were analysed using repeated measures analysis of variance, with three independent variables; gender, frequency of consumption (both only significant for margarine) and age (ns).

Findings

Significant differences between the various technologies were found for four of the five products (not orange juice) by technology. Belief evaluation constructs that differed for all technologies investigated were health, natural content, familiarity and political values. Furthermore, price, ecological welfare, and impression management underlie attitudes towards some technologies.

Originality/value

While based on a relatively small Australian convenience sample, these findings suggest that scientists and manufacturers would be well advised to test concept products produced by novel technologies to ensure that they are perceived positively; otherwise uptake and success in the marketplace will be impeded if information on the technology were, as is increasingly likely in an age of freely available information, to be revealed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 12 May 2020

Stanislav Mamonov and Raquel Benbunan-Fich

This study examines the factorial structure of salient user beliefs associated with smart locks. We also examine the predictive value of the identified constructs on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the factorial structure of salient user beliefs associated with smart locks. We also examine the predictive value of the identified constructs on the smart lock adoption intention and we evaluate gender differences in the predictive value of the identified constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

The study assumes pragmatic epistemological stance and it leverages mixed-methods research design. The research progresses through three stages: belief elicitation, exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis within a nomological network. New groups of participants were recruited for each stage of the study.

Findings

We find that while potential adopters express a broad range of perceived benefits and concerns associated with smart locks, only the perceived relative advantage of smart locks vis-à-vis conventional locks in providing safety and security is significantly correlated with adoption intention for both genders. We also find that perceived novel benefits are a significant predictor of the smart lock adoption intention for women, but not for men.

Research limitations/implications

Our results indicate that perceived relative advantage can be the singular critical consideration in the adoption of smart home technologies that replace incumbent solutions. The results also demonstrate that gender-specific models can better capture gender effects that influence technology adoption and use.

Practical implications

Smart home technology vendors would need to convince prospective users that new technology is better than the incumbent solutions on the core affordances of the incumbent technology. Men and women differ in the consideration of novel benefits afforded by novel technologies.

Originality/value

This is among the first studies to examine salient beliefs that affect smart home technology adoption. The findings suggest that the traditional models (TAM, UTAUT) do not capture the key salient beliefs that can influence innovative smart home technology adoption. The study also suggests that gendered models are needed to understand technology adoption in contexts where technology adoption intersects with gender roles.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Glykeria Karagouni

The purpose of this paper is to explore how low-technology corporate ventures use knowledge from multiple and often trans-sectoral fields to intensively create and deploy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how low-technology corporate ventures use knowledge from multiple and often trans-sectoral fields to intensively create and deploy innovative production technologies in order to sustain significant competitive advantages.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper primarily draws evidence from an exploratory case study of a low-tech private enterprise operating in the wood processing industry in Greece.

Findings

Low-technology firms appear to invest mainly in process innovation and therefore production technologies, in order to secure a position within mature markets. Within the notion of knowledge-intensive entrepreneurship (KIE), a creative bricolage of knowledge based on research work and industrial practice results in innovative products and processes covering technologies from a wide range, including high-tech industries. The case indicates that low-tech companies may be something more than just “borrowers” of technology.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations regard the single case study research design and the focus on the wood industry in Greece. Future research may pursue more case studies in different traditional sectors and national contexts.

Practical implications

Entrepreneurs and managers of low-technology firms should focus on technological innovation and more specifically on co-creation of novel production technologies in order to sustain strong competitive advantages and enhance performances.

Originality/value

The analysis challenges the established opinion of common entrepreneurial processes in low-tech sectors. It adds to the ongoing discussion of low-tech, KIE and it contributes to the literature of industrial dynamics since there are only a handful of studies that probe the role of production technologies within a low-tech but knowledge-intensive context.

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Duy Quoc Nguyen

Organizational innovations are closely associated with organizational knowledge, and thus a firm builds its knowledge base to enhance its innovative performance. However…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizational innovations are closely associated with organizational knowledge, and thus a firm builds its knowledge base to enhance its innovative performance. However, insights into this process are still limited, especially in the context of firms in developing countries. Building on the dynamic managerial capabilities literature and open innovation paradigm, this paper attempts to fill this gap by developing and empirically testing a model that investigates how firms in developing countries accumulate knowledge to innovate.

Design/methodology/approach

A model of a firm's knowledge accumulation and innovation is proposed in which it specifies relationships among absorptive capacity, knowledge breadth, research and development (R&D), knowledge depth, exploratory innovation and exploitative innovation, and then it is empirically tested by using the structural equation modeling (SEM) technique based on the surveyed data of Vietnamese firms.

Findings

The results indicate that absorptive capacity positively influences both knowledge breadth and knowledge depth, knowledge breadth positively influences R&D, R&D positively influences exploratory innovation and knowledge depth, and knowledge depth positively influences exploratory and exploitative innovation.

Practical implications

The study proposes an “acquire and develop” open innovation model for firms in developing countries in which firms acquire external technologies and then develop R&D (develop and design) capability to adapt acquired technologies to their local conditions to create new organizational-specific capabilities and exploratory innovation.

Originality/value

This study argues that external knowledge acquisition is beneficial to innovative performance of firms in developing countries via renewing their knowledge base. Furthermore, the study provides the unique evidence that novel external knowledge acquisition and internal R&D are fit to each other in the fit-as-mediation form in which novel external knowledge acquisition is mediated by R&D to positively influence exploratory innovation.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Toula Perrea, Athanasios Krystallis, Charlotte Engelgreen and Polymeros Chrysochou

The paper aims to address the issue of how customer value is created in the context of novel food products and how customer value influences product evaluation.

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1046

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to address the issue of how customer value is created in the context of novel food products and how customer value influences product evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study proposes a model formed by a series of causal relations among value (i.e. functional, social, hedonic, altruistic values) and cost perceptions (i.e. price, effort, evaluation costs, performance and product safety), their trade-offs (i.e. overall customer value) and product evaluation outcomes (i.e. satisfaction, trust).

Findings

Despite doubts about certain search (information), credence (safety) and experience (taste) attributes, perceptions about product quality, likeability and ethical image predominantly formulate customer value, indicating novel products’ potential to be evaluated positively by consumers.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed model advances knowledge in the context of product innovation. Contrary to past research that focuses on consumer attitudes towards a manufacturing technology and individual technology-specific risks and benefits, the customer value approach refers to novel product-related consumer attitudes conceptualized as overall customer value; the latter results from product-related value-cost trade-offs, leading towards specific consumer–product evaluations.

Practical implications

The customer value approach refers to the value from the adoption of a new product that underlies a relevant set of product attributes (e.g. quality, image, sustainability, price, convenience, taste, safety, etc.) Focusing on product attributes that generate gain – loss perceptions impactful on consumer – product evaluations is highly relevant for product managers concerned with new product development.

Originality/value

The originality of this work lies in the successful contextualization and testing of an inclusive model that comprises both emotional and rational components, operational at the product level, to generate substantial insights on the widely unexplored interplay between consumer – perceived customer value and the generation of consumer – product evaluation outcomes.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2010

Suzette Keith

Older adults are increasingly being recognised as an important and growing consumer market, however they appear reticent in adopting new technologies. One contributing…

Abstract

Older adults are increasingly being recognised as an important and growing consumer market, however they appear reticent in adopting new technologies. One contributing factor is that their needs are poorly understood by designers and products are thus poorly specified. Within the context of driving as a socially valuable skilled behaviour we applied a participatory design approach to engage with older people as valued partners in the design process.This article examines different strategies for involving older people as experts in their own domain, developing a better understanding of their needs and aspirations and empowering them within the design process. This research took account of new developments in car design and opportunities for intelligent driver assistance systems to support driver safety. The study found that older car drivers responded well to the opportunity to identify their needs and to evaluate prototypes and novel technologies. Their appraisal of these novel technologies particularly supported an improved understanding of the skilled behaviours of older drivers and of the mismatch between these and the technologies. When incorporated into the early stages of the design process, these evaluation activities offer important opportunities to enhance understanding of latent and implicit needs of older adults. In turn this can inform and refine design requirements.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2013

Jenni Hakola

The purpose of this study is to examine the value formation and value perceptions of brand owners and retailers in the new digital packaging technology context. The focus…

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2402

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the value formation and value perceptions of brand owners and retailers in the new digital packaging technology context. The focus of this study concerns the potential of new packaging technologies to offer new value dimensions compared with those offered by current technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were gathered via group interviews conducted in 11 organizations at the brand owner and retail levels. The interviewees consisted of marketing and packaging professionals. A grand tour method and a customer value determination (CVD) method were used as analysis tools.

Findings

This study suggests a value category in the business-to-business context classifying the value drivers of packaging technologies at the product-, service-, and relationship-related levels. Value consists of sub-elements of both positive benefits and negative sacrifices.

Practical implications

This article provides practical implications for organizations both to increase the benefits received through packaging technologies and decrease unavoidable sacrifices.

Originality/value

This study extends the rather scarce knowledge pertaining to value creation and perception in the novel technology context. The value categorization offers a necessary complement to the existing literature concerning value in the business-to-business field.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Antonino Galati, Pietro Moavero and Maria Crescimanno

The purpose of this paper is to investigate consumers’ willingness to accept irradiated food and the major factors related both to socio-demographic characteristics and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate consumers’ willingness to accept irradiated food and the major factors related both to socio-demographic characteristics and to the perceived risk of consumers about the assumption of foods treated with novel technologies and irradiation, in particular, affecting their behavior. Consumers’ need for information has been investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey, involving 392 consumers living in Italy, was carried out to respond to the aim of the study. A Probit model was performed in order to identify major factors affecting the probability to accept food treated with ionizing radiation.

Findings

Findings show that the acceptability of irradiated foods is mainly affected by the consumers’ perceived risk to health consequent to their consumption. Equally influent are the socio-economic characteristics such as age, monthly income and geographical area in which consumers live.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides some interesting suggestions both for policy makers and managers, primarily related to the need to start an effective promotion campaign aimed to familiarize the consumers about the principles, aims and benefits of irradiation technology.

Originality/value

Very few empirical studies have been carried out in order to evaluate the acceptability of foods products treated with ionizing radiation in Italy, where exist a growing problem related to the food loss and waste, and the need for information among consumers about the irradiated foods.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2019

Jonathan Masior

The effective management and reuse of knowledge in the early product development supports the early identification of high potential technologies, reduces barriers of…

Abstract

Purpose

The effective management and reuse of knowledge in the early product development supports the early identification of high potential technologies, reduces barriers of accessing them and ensures technology leadership. Until now, technology databases were only a means of communicating knowledge on innovations. The purpose of this study is to analyse the design of technology databases with a processual integration into research and development. It is a concept for companies to collaboratively and effectively develop and adapt innovative technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

In the Design4Energy project, an interdisciplinary, inter-divisional project team, including information and communications technology managers, engineers and energy experts, developed an architectural concept and use cases of a system to integrate the technology life cycle into the building creation process. Eventually, the stakeholders evaluated the system in industrial applications.

Findings

This research reveals that the developed system supports the collaboration between professionals in the design stage. Along the development and implementation of the system, the main success factors result in four design principles: effective and efficient design, basic functionalities supporting technology adaption, interoperability and integration into the processes and organization.

Practical implications

The results deal with the interoperability in early phases of product development and guide through the methodological design of technology databases. Transparent design requirements based on real case learnings increase system applicability and data consistency.

Originality/value

The work guides the methodology, process integration and IT architecture of technology databases, which literature does not provide. Thus, it leads to decision reliability in technology management and implies the success factors for living databases.

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