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Case study
Publication date: 7 February 2018

Uchenna Uzo and Louis Nzegwu

Marketing, Brand management, Social media marketing, Digital marketing.

Abstract

Subject area

Marketing, Brand management, Social media marketing, Digital marketing.

Study level/applicability

The case can be taught in MBA courses and executive education programs.

Case overview

Dufil Prima Limited is the manufacturer of Indomie noodles and a market leader in the noodles market of Nigeria that exports products to Congo, Ivory Coast, Ghana and Benin Republic. However, the company has experienced a drop in the market share from 78 per cent in 2010 to 54 per cent in 2015. This drop is largely due to rising competition, Nigeria’s economic downturn and the inability to grow a consumer base in Northern Nigeria. Kenneth Iruonagbe, a social media executive of the company, is responsible for developing a social media and digital marketing strategy for the company to increase the market share position by 16 per cent in the next three years. Kenneth is convinced that a growth in the Northern Nigeria market share is critical for improving the market position in the entire country and facilitating the market penetration in the other four countries. A number of options are being considered to address the current problem. Because of the sharp differences in the consumption habits, cultural values and lifestyles of consumers of noodles in the northern and southern parts of Nigeria, the options may be difficult to implement. Dufil needs to engage in the delicate task of crafting a social media and digital marketing strategy that will be consistent with the values of the Indomie brand and yet prevent the risk of brand confusion and alienation on the part of consumers. The company has one month to roll out its plan.

Expected learning outcomes

Highlight how cultural branding through social media applies to consumer markets in Africa Explain the fundamentals of brand building and also introduce the concepts of integrated marketing communication, below-the-line, above-the-line, social media and digital marketing. Explain how social media and digital marketing could be used to move consumers from brand awareness to brand loyalty. Explain how to craft social media and digital marketing strategies that are relevant to countries facing an economic downturn. Highlight the lessons from internationalizing a brand across various African countries.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS: 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2020

Benjamin Sunday Uzochukwu, Chinyere Cecilia Okeke, Joyce Ogwezi, Benedict Emunemu, Felicia Onibon, Bassey Ebenso, Tolib Mirzoev and Ghazala Mir

The importance of social exclusion and the disadvantage experienced by many minority ethnic and religious populations are rooted in SDG 10. To address this exclusion…

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of social exclusion and the disadvantage experienced by many minority ethnic and religious populations are rooted in SDG 10. To address this exclusion effectively it is important to understand their key drivers. This paper aimed to establish the key drivers of exclusion and their outcomes in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The methods involved a scoping review of literature and stakeholder workshops that focused on drivers of social exclusion of religious and ethnic minorities in public institutions.

Findings

At the macro level, the drivers include ineffective centralized federal State, competition for resources and power among groups, geographic developmental divide and socio-cultural/religious issues. At the meso-level are institutional rules and competition for resources, stereotypes and misconceptions, barriers to access and service provision. At the micro-level are socio-economic status and health-seeking behaviour. The perceived impact of social exclusion included increasing illiteracy, lack of employment, deteriorating health care services, increased social vices, communal clashes and insurgencies and vulnerability to exploitation and humiliation. These drivers must be taken into consideration in the development of interventions for preventing or reducing social exclusion of ethnic and religious minorities from public services.

Originality/value

This is a case of co-production by all the stakeholders and a novel way for the identification of drivers of social exclusion in public services in Nigeria. It is the first step towards solving the problem of exclusion and has implications for the achievement of SDG 10 in Nigeria.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 41 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Hamisu Salihu

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the question: “Is Boko Haram (BH) a ‘child’ of economic circumstances”? In other words, do economic problems of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the question: “Is Boko Haram (BH) a ‘child’ of economic circumstances”? In other words, do economic problems of poverty, unemployment, illiteracy and population growth lie at the root of BH insurgency in Nigeria? Finding (an) objective answer(s) to this question informs the purpose for this paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The author uses both ordinary least squares (OLS) regressions and descriptive statistics to provide answer(s) to the question(s) asked.

Findings

The OLS regressions result show that terrorism incidence and intensity (TII) and unemployment levels are positively related and statistically significant over the range of the sample. Gross domestic product and population growth of the country on the other hand have been found to be statistically insignificant with TII. The results from the descriptive statistics show a high and above average Northern Nigeria’s economic indexes of poverty, unemployment, population growth and illiteracy rates. Thus, the author deduces that economic factors of poverty, unemployment, illiteracy and unchecked population growth could not be ruled out as possible causes of BH terrorism.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this research may be peculiar, limited and applicable only to the region of research – Northern Nigeria. The author is, therefore, constrained to generalise the findings across countries or other terrorist organisations. Also, while terrorists often quote religious texts to justify their actions, researchers often find it difficult to establish the veracity of such claims because: religious texts are, more often than not, subjects of different, contextual, sectarian and scholarly interpretations and If we take the terrorists’ claim for religious inspiration at their face value, the contradiction of why terrorists represent a minority fringe in particular religions or, why the vast majority of those who share same religion with terrorists do not partake in terrorism, crops up. For these reasons, this research is constrained from exploring terrorists’ religious motivations.

Practical implications

An implication of the findings of this research is that it avails the Nigerian Government with fact that, to fight BH successfully, it needs to also address the issues of poverty, unemployment, illiteracy and uncontrolled population growth. Thus, in essence, the anti-BH campaign should not only be limited to the “sticks” but the “carrots” of poverty alleviation, unemployment reduction, raising literacy rates and awareness about controlling birthrate.

Social implications

Social welfare programs are likely to be devised to tackle the issues raised.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, no research explored the possibility of whether or not economic factors of poverty, unemployment and illiteracy could have been the causes or contributory factors for the emergence of BH terrorist organisation in Nigeria. Research on BH mostly focusses on social and political dimensions leaving the economic aspect either superficially explained or completely unexplored. The originality of this paper derives from this.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 45 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 21 July 2015

The meeting comes in the context of Boko Haram's spate of bombings and attacks in northern Nigeria since Buhari's inauguration on May 29. The violence follows military…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB201109

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2016

Alison Pflepsen, Amber Gove, R. Drake Warrick, Muhammad Bello Yusuf and Bilyaminu Inuwa Bello

In November 2016, the Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA) reached a milestone 10 years since it was first developed as a tool to measure and report on student…

Abstract

In November 2016, the Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA) reached a milestone 10 years since it was first developed as a tool to measure and report on student acquisition of foundational literacy skills, particularly in low and middle income countries. Since then, a number of observations have been raised with respect to the appropriateness of the tool for diverse contexts, the process of instrument adaptation, data collection logistics and their potential to affect the quality of the results, and the utility of the assessment in leading to literacy improvement. These issues are not often discussed in formal reports and published articles. In this commentary, the authors address these observations by reviewing the theoretical underpinnings and purpose of the EGRA, providing guidance on key aspects of EGRA design and implementation, and sharing their experience using EGRA in northern Nigeria for multiple data collections. This chapter is based on the direct involvement of the authors in several EGRA exercises conducted in Nigeria, from instrument conception to administration to results analysis.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2016
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-528-7

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2019

Precious C. Ezeh, Anayo D. Nkamnebe and Uzezi P. Omodafe

As part of the strategy to curb the rising unemployment among Nigerian undergraduates, entrepreneurship subjects were made compulsory in the curriculum of all the higher…

Abstract

Purpose

As part of the strategy to curb the rising unemployment among Nigerian undergraduates, entrepreneurship subjects were made compulsory in the curriculum of all the higher educational institutions (HEIs) in Nigeria. The idea is to trigger strong desire for enterprise creation rather than remaining job seekers among the undergraduates upon graduation. Accordingly, this paper aims to determine predictors to entrepreneurial intentions among university students in Muslim community of Northern Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Theory of planned behaviour was extended to include compatibility and educational support. The model was empirically tested and was analysed using the partial least square structural equation modelling technique on a sample of 312 higher institution students in Zamfara State.

Findings

The finding shows that entrepreneurial intention is taken as a function of educational support, compatibility and perceived behavioural control. The extended model has predictive relevance, and it explained 36 per cent of variance in entrepreneurial intention.

Originality/value

The inclusion of compatibility has a unique effect on this study; no study has tested the effects of compatibility in entrepreneurial intention. In addition, no study has been conducted in a core Muslim state in Northern Nigeria, where most of the economic policies are Islamic-driven and unemployment rate is relatively high. In addition, no study has been conducted in the context of necessity entrepreneurship using TPB.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 43 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1962

IN A SPARSELY‐POPULATED continent like Africa, Nigeria with a population of 40 million (the largest in the continent) offers a big potential for library service…

Abstract

IN A SPARSELY‐POPULATED continent like Africa, Nigeria with a population of 40 million (the largest in the continent) offers a big potential for library service. Spectacular progress has been made in the field of primary and secondary education in recent years and more and more Nigerians are becoming library‐conscious. The thirst for knowledge is so great that each of the governments in the Federation is spending more than 20 per cent of its revenue on education alone. Even the older generation who had no opportunity of attending schools are now striving to read and write their own language in their spare time and the young ones are giving them every encouragement by giving voluntary service as teachers. Every effort is being made to wipe out illiteracy altogether and everywhere throughout the country, the story is one of success.

Details

New Library World, vol. 64 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Abdurrahman Abdullahi, Anwar Hasan Abdullah Othman and Salina Kassim

This paper aims to examine the determinants of intention to adopt Islamic microfinance among prospective customers in Nigeria, to enhance access to formal financial services.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the determinants of intention to adopt Islamic microfinance among prospective customers in Nigeria, to enhance access to formal financial services.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative study used the proportionate stratified random sampling technique to collect data from 450 respondents, using close-ended questionnaires. The data was analyzed using analysis of moment structures-structural equation modeling. The decomposed theory of planned behavior (DTPB) was used as the underlying theory to test 10 hypotheses.

Findings

Results showed the intention toward the adoption of Islamic microfinance is high in Nigeria. In total, 8 of the 10 study hypotheses were supported, out of which attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control were found to have a positive and significant influence on the behavioral intention to adopt Islamic microfinance. Consequently, the study recommends the need for stakeholders in the Nigerian financial system to embark on enlightenment campaigns that will improve the public attitude on the role of Islamic microfinance banks in the promotion of financial inclusion and poverty reduction.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused specifically on three selected states in Northern Nigeria that are predominantly Muslim. The findings and indeed the conclusions of the study, may not be suitable for generalization to other parts of the country.

Practical implications

The study found that three constructs: attitude, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control were found to affect behavioral intention. Thus, the Central Bank of Nigeria and Islamic financial institutions should tailor their enlightenment campaigns toward improving public attitude on the need to adopt Islamic microfinance banks to further enhance financial inclusion, and thus reduce the incidence of poverty. Islamic microfinance banks should complement their commercial products and services with Islamic social finance products such as Sadaqat, Zakat and benevolent loan, as is the practice in jurisdictions where Islamic finance is institutionalized.

Social implications

The social implication of the study is its ability to determine factors that will enhance financial inclusion in Nigeria. This will assist in reducing poverty and income inequality.

Originality/value

The study was also able to extend the DTPB by introducing awareness as an additional latent construct in explaining attitude.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9369

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 24 October 2019

Nigeria's northern insecurity.

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 23 April 2015

Boko Haram has been severely weakened by the regional military offensive underway since February. With some assistance from Nigerian soldiers, troops from Chad, Cameroon…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB199124

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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